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Gliese 710

far future

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#1
OrbitalResonance

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Gliese 710 is in the Center, currently 63 light years away.

In 1.4 million years, Gliese 710 will pass our solar system at a distance of ~1.09 light years and will appear as bright and as red in the night sky as Betelgeuse. Gliese 710 does have a 1 in 10,000 chance of coming within 1,000 AUs of Sol, which could significantly perturb the Oort Cloud, the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt, and even slightly alter the orbit of Neptune. This will increase the number of comets in the night sky, but it’s unlikely, however, that this will lead to an extinction-level impact.

Gliese 710 is a relatively dim, main sequence orange-red or red dwarf star of spectral and luminosity K5-M1 V. The star may have about 0.4 to 0.6 (possibly 42 percent) of Sol's mass, possibly 67 percent of its diameter and only 4.2 percent of its visual luminosity.

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#2
Logically Irrational

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#3
OrbitalResonance

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New Article from Forbes detailing another close encounter with a star. The article includes Gliese 710, but also highlights another star that I did not know about.

 

http://www.forbes.co...nge-dwarf-star/


We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers. - Carl Sagan


#4
OrbitalResonance

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Hello Everyone, its been a while.

 

New data from GAIA suggests that Gliese 710 will pass even closer to the sun than imagined before, a mere 13,000 AU, or .2 lightyears. This will happen in 1.3 million years and will be perhaps one of the most significant events in the solar system's history. The star will look about as bright as Venus in the sky and will hurtle about 10 large comets a year into the inner system for a timespan of up to 3 million years.

 

http://www.aanda.org...aa29835-16.html


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We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers. - Carl Sagan


#5
Erowind

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That's really cool this reminds me of the plot to Robert Forward's novel Dragon's Egg.


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#6
Jakob

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That's really cool this reminds me of the plot to Robert Forward's novel Dragon's Egg.

Oh, you read that? What did you think?


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#7
Matthew

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imgane if it came within 200 AU. Now that would be something.


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#8
Erowind

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That's really cool this reminds me of the plot to Robert Forward's novel Dragon's Egg.

Oh, you read that? What did you think?

 

I enjoyed it a lot, not as much as I enjoy Greg Egan's work but Dragon's Egg was still pretty good. It is hard sci fi so depending on the reader Forward's extensive explanations will either be very boring or very interesting. The aliens in the book are truly alien in a physiological sense, but their culture is very human. There is also a questionable plot device later in the book that had me going, "you can't be serious" aloud. Overall it is not the best hard sci fi I've ever read but if you run across the book it is still worth a read, just don't pick it over something like Schild's Ladder or Dune. 7/10 


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#9
Jakob

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That's really cool this reminds me of the plot to Robert Forward's novel Dragon's Egg.

Oh, you read that? What did you think?

 

I enjoyed it a lot, not as much as I enjoy Greg Egan's work but Dragon's Egg was still pretty good. It is hard sci fi so depending on the reader Forward's extensive explanations will either be very boring or very interesting. The aliens in the book are truly alien in a physiological sense, but their culture is very human. There is also a questionable plot device later in the book that had me going, "you can't be serious" aloud. Overall it is not the best hard sci fi I've ever read but if you run across the book it is still worth a read, just don't pick it over something like Schild's Ladder or Dune. 7/10 

 

I thought it was an interesting idea for an alien civilization, especially the idea that they live a million times faster. The similarity to human culture doesn't really bother me since we did uplift them. The early part of their civilization's history was fascinating, though I can't help but think that they didn't live up to their fullest potential in the sequel Starquake. There were many paths they could've taken, but they seemed to largely stagnate in the end. Though perhaps they simply have less curiosity and expansionism than humans. The characterization is the biggest flaw in my opinion: the humans might as well have been a bunch of robots for all the personality they had. (Starquake did a little better, but not much.) The cheela were also a little better, but something does seem lacking about them. I guess I'd also say 7/10.


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#10
Erowind

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I thought it was an interesting idea for an alien civilization, especially the idea that they live a million times faster. The similarity to human culture doesn't really bother me since we did uplift them. The early part of their civilization's history was fascinating, though I can't help but think that they didn't live up to their fullest potential in the sequel Starquake. There were many paths they could've taken, but they seemed to largely stagnate in the end. Though perhaps they simply have less curiosity and expansionism than humans. The characterization is the biggest flaw in my opinion: the humans might as well have been a bunch of robots for all the personality they had. (Starquake did a little better, but not much.) The cheela were also a little better, but something does seem lacking about them. I guess I'd also say 7/10.

Oh cool you've read it too, I don't have to worry about spoilers then. The part where the Cheela cured Amalita's breast cancer was the plot device I was referring to. It felt a bit forced. and I think a visit to Dragon Slayer would have been enough. The thought of a 70 year old physicist describing slow moving breasts also made me laugh. Who knows maybe I'm immature, but there are a lot better ways to get raunchy stuff into a book. Winston and Julia's relationship in 1984 comes to mind.  


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#11
Jakob

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^Very true, now that you mention it. I remember thinking it was a bit odd at the time, but just plowed on.

 

 

 The thought of a 70 year old physicist describing slow moving breasts also made me laugh.

You win 1 internet.

 

Though I'm sure he, being a physicist, has the exact equations written down somewhere.


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#12
Erowind

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^Very true, now that you mention it. I remember thinking it was a bit odd at the time, but just plowed on.

 

 

 The thought of a 70 year old physicist describing slow moving breasts also made me laugh.

You win 1 internet.

 

Though I'm sure he, being a physicist, has the exact equations written down somewhere.

:D that's brilliant, I wonder what the title of the file is in his archive. :lol:


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