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Drones & UAVs News and Discussions


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#1
wjfox

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Leaked FAA Document Provides Glimpse Into Drone Regulations

2/14/2015

The FAA appears poised to release regulations that will impose a minimal burden on businesses, paving the way for integration of drones into the national airspace.  Information about the forthcoming regulations is contained in an inadvertently published document that appears to be an FAA economic analysis of the long awaited regulations for small drones.  In no uncertain terms, the purported FAA economic analysis assumes that drones provide great social and economic benefits, will save lives, and can be integrated into the national airspace with minimal risk while providing benefits that far outweigh their costs.

http://www.forbes.co...ng-regulations/


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#2
Time_Traveller

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US drone rules impact Amazon plans

 

16 February 2015

 

The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) draft rules for the use of drones in US airspace do not permit Amazon to launch its Amazon Air delivery service.

The draft rules state that pilots must remain within eyesight of their unmanned craft, although it said it would consider factoring in a second line of sight in some cases.
Pilots must also be FAA-certified to operate drones.
Amazon said it remained "committed" to its plans for delivery via drone.
"We are committed to realising our vision... and are prepared to deploy where we have the regulatory support we need," said Paul Misener, Amazon's vice-president of global public policy.
The firm had said last year that in terms of the technology required for Amazon Air, it was ready to launch as soon as regulations were in place.
The draft rules will be open to public consultation and are unlikely to come into force for a couple of years.
The Small UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) Coalition, of which Amazon is a member, said it "applauded" the proposed rules, launched yesterday by the FAA, but mentioned several caveats, including relaxing the rule about line of sight.
"First Person View technology is available now, and is critical to unleashing the power of automation in this space," the group said in a statement.
"Until small UAVs are able to go beyond the line of sight, we are not maximising the technology as other companies already do."

 

 
 

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#3
Yuli Ban

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WHAT DOES THE DRONE INDUSTRY THINK OF THE FAA’S NEW RULES?
 


The Federal Aviation Administration did something rather remarkable on Sunday: they proposed a new set of drone rules. For years, drone hobbyists and businesses have been left in limbo, flying in unregulated skies and wondering whether they were unintentionally breaking the law. In 2012, Congress mandated that the FAA offer new rules for small unmanned aircraft by 2015, and breaking with expectations, the FAA actually delivered.
There are some immediate losers in Sunday’s announcement. An Amazon executive said that Prime Air, Amazon’s planned drone delivery service, couldn’t operate in America under the proposed rules. Third party drone app makers will also find that self-piloting software is, if not quietly discouraged, left unaddressed by the proposed rules requirement that only the drone's operator control the drone. And the Academy of Model Aeronautics is worried that model airplanes will be swept up in the new regulations.

lm_procerus_quad.jpg?itok=q6tB8ZiT


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#4
Yuli Ban

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THE DREAM OF DELIVERY DRONES IS ALIVE (AND ON A TRUCK)
THERE'S HOPE FOR ROBOTIC PARCEL DELIVERY, WITH OR WITHOUT AMAZON
 


Amazon's drone delivery service was never going to work. Not in the United States, at least, and not in the near-future timeframe announced by CEO Jeff Bezos in a credulous 60 Minutes segment in December 2013. When Bezos made the prediction that self-guided drones would start delivering packages to customers' doors as early as 2015, it was clear to everyone building, flying and hoping to fly drones that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had no plans to allow for something like Prime Air to function. Amazon's program requires autonomous flight in densely populated areas—robots flying themselves, over lots of human beings. There's no better recipe for disaster, at this early stage in the development and deployment of commercial drones.
And yet, Amazon's PR stunt went off without a hitch. [Note: Popular Science just ran a Q&A with the VP of Prime Air, who seems like an excellent and conscientious person. My crotchety opinions of Bezos, 60 Minutes, and the way Amazon's drone program was debuted are my own.] Despite denouncements in the media, the company's plan become synonymous with the push for commercial drone rules in the U.S. Now that those initial regulations have arrived, the attention is still on Amazon, and whether it's going to take its delivery drones to another country, presumably one with less stringent safety requirements. The FAA's requirement that unmanned aircraft stay within a human's unbroken line of sight throughout its operation is a deal-breaker for Prime Air, as is the restriction on carrying external payloads. That Amazon's scheme is grounded is not news. It was always going to be.
But there's hope yet for drone delivery. Cincinnati-based Amp Holdings is currently developing a drone, called Horsefly, that deploys from a compartment in the roof of an electric delivery truck. After each delivery, the aircraft would return to the truck for its next package. It's strong enough to carry parcels as heavy as 10 pounds (double what Amazon is shooting for), and durable enough to fly through, wind, rain and snow on its appointed rounds.

amp_horsefly.jpg?itok=XFBf0j8n


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#5
Mike the average

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im probably the only one celebrating, because last year I actually said id eat my hat if they allow drone deliveries. 


'Force always attracts men of low morality' - Einstein
'Great spirits always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds' - Einstein

#6
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Amsterdam To Host World's First Drone Circus With Royal Netherlands Air Force In 2015

While there is, thus far, no exact date of the event, the AIR 2015 will take place in fall of 2015 and the event -- named "Our World of AIR" -- will boast hundreds of drones.

“In this high energy and explosive show, drones will take centre stage to bring a collaboration and fusion of music, video, projections and special effects," said Fjuze, the event’s promoter, in an online statement. "AIR allows you to experience a variety of ballet and battles, races and lasers, circus, illusions and most of all magic from hundreds of drones.”

maxresdefault.jpg

I called it. 'Nother prediction confirmed.
Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#7
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The Mexican immigrant who set up a global drone firm
 
Mexican immigrant Jordi Munoz says that waiting for his green card after he first moved to the United States made him feel as if he was living "in a big jail".


At the time he was 20 years old, and he and his girlfriend had set up home near Los Angeles.
Yet he could not legally work, or even enrol at a college, until he got the identity card that proved his right to live and seek employment in the country.
But instead of just sitting around during his frustrating seven-month wait back in 2007, Mr Munoz, a keen model plane enthusiast and computer programmer, started to build his own drone in his garage.
A drone, technically an unmanned aerial vehicle, is essentially a very high tech and stable version of a remote-controlled plane with a camera attached to take aerial photographs or record videos.
Using what parts he had to hand, Mr Munoz made the drone's autopilot system by taking the motion sensors from a games console remote control.
To attach the microchips to circuit boards he heated them up in a domestic oven.
Fast forward to today, and Mr Munoz, now 28, is the co-founder of the largest US-owned manufacturer of commercial drones.
The business, 3D Robotics, is expected to enjoy sales of $50m (£33m) this year.

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This guy is what they mean when they say "there could be 10 million Einsteins, Teslas, Musks, da Vincis, etc. who live and die without ever realizing their potential simply because they were born into the wrong conditions."


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#8
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Brain-controlled drones - Technology that allows a drone to be piloted from the ground using only a person's brainwaves has been demonstrated.


Technology that allows a drone to be piloted from the ground using only a person's brainwaves has been demonstrated in Portugal.
The company behind the development, Tekever, said the technology could in the short term be used to enable people with restricted movement to control aircraft.
Longer term the firm said piloting of larger jets, such as cargo planes, could be controlled in this way without the need for a crew on board.
However, one aviation expert told the BBC he thought the industry would be unlikely to adopt such technology due to a perception of being potentially unsafe.


Friggin called it, didn't I?


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#9
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Amsterdam To Host World's First Drone Circus With Royal Netherlands Air Force In 2015
 

While there is, thus far, no exact date of the event, the AIR 2015 will take place in fall of 2015 and the event -- named "Our World of AIR" -- will boast hundreds of drones.

“In this high energy and explosive show, drones will take centre stage to bring a collaboration and fusion of music, video, projections and special effects," said Fjuze, the event’s promoter, in an online statement. "AIR allows you to experience a variety of ballet and battles, races and lasers, circus, illusions and most of all magic from hundreds of drones.”

maxresdefault.jpg

I called it. 'Nother prediction confirmed.

 

Here's the promo.

 

I totally wish I could be there, so Imma snatch a DK2 and view a live stream.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#10
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Crocs 'midair shoe store' is staffed by drones


My friends and family don't let me wear Crocs. But still, I'm in the middle of Tokyo to see Crocs send a drone flying to pick up a (hypothetical) customers' shoes. It's all to do with promoting the shoemaker's new range of lightweight Norlin footwear -- they're not the Crocs you're thinking of -- and it involves a custom-built drone delivering the correct style and size to the customer. On top of that, it's all automated, so it's like a giant Crocs-themed vending machine... albeit with drones.

crocs.jpg
 
Of course it's in Japan.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#11
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Drone Ambulance: Fast Urban Quadcopter Flies with 1 EMT, Folds Down to Size of a Car

If you have ever seen ambulances, police cars or fire trucks stuck in rush hour traffic, you may already sense that the future of emergency response in cities is definitely destined to fly the friendly skies. 

A vision of argodesign, this particular solution is compact, fast and contains the bare minimum needed to help save the estimated 1,000 lives lost per year to slow response times – specifically: a single emergency medical technician.

drone-ambulance-futuristic-design-468x35


 

Oh! My.


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#12
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Personal drone registration will become necessary, U.K. Lords say


A U.K House of Lords committee has recommended that, in the long term, people operating drones for leisure may need to register them so their owners can be traced.
The House’s European Union Committee issued a report on Thursday into various aspects of drone regulation. It said there would soon be a need for commercial drone operators to register their flights somewhere, so as to keep airspace safe, but it also noted that hobbyist or leisure-use drones were on the increase, and this may cause issues in the long run.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#13
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Amazon says the FAA is so slow, the delivery drone it approved is already obsolete

 
 

Amazon.com is not pleased with the pace by which the Federal Aviation Administration is addressing the commercial use of drones and it let the public know in a congressional hearing on Tuesday.
In a Washington, D.C. meeting with Senate members of the Subcommittee on Aviation, Operations, Safety and Security, Paul Misener, Amazon’s vice president of global public policy, criticized the FAA for lacking “impetus” to develop timely policies for the operations of unmanned aerial systems (UASs or UAVs).  Amazon, which has been pushing for greater regulatory clarity and experimental permission for its Prime Air drone delivery service, said that the United States has been far less progressive than other countries with its unmanned aircraft regulations that have, in part, stifled innovation.

 

amazondrone1-1940x1000.jpeg


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#14
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First Drone Day draws hundreds to see demos, races

 
 

International Drone Day buzzed and darted into Delaware Sunday, drawing hundreds to Brandywine Creek State Park.
Presented by Skygear Solutions Inc., based on Kirkwood Highway near Stanton, the event was a hit with Drew Stewart of Brennan Estates in Glasgow, who dubbed the drones "awesome."...

Video behind the link.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#15
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DARPA wants an army of drones to overwhelm the enemy

 

US air warfare superiority has always been a constant, but the nation's pricey, complex new fighter jets can't dominate the air if they can't get there. Even the military's science arm, DARPA, said that "US military systems today are often too expensive... (and) are obsolete by the time they become operational." Ouch. But DARPA is at least doing something about the problem. It's developed a project called the System of Systems Integration Technology and Experimentation (SoSITE) with the aim of nothing less than completely overhauling US military air power. To do that, it wants to build open systems that help drones, missiles, "mission truck" planes and fighter jets work together.

 

The idea is so simple, you have to wonder why they didn't do it before. In one scenario (see the video below), a modern fighter is accompanied by an unmanned, C-130-sized "mission truck" in an attack on enemy radar systems. The larger plane would stay outside the attack zone, but carry loads of extra missiles and drones to increase the fighter jet's punch.

 


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#16
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It's been a while since SH put out something newsworthy. Pilots Need Not Apply: Matternet Launches Autonomous Drone Delivery System

But here’s where Matternet ONE is different from most other drones—no pilots are required. The drone flies itself to and from destinations. Also, because it's a delivery system, the drone may need to fly further than limited battery life allows. The solutions to these problems are on the ground and in the cloud.

Matternet ONE makes use of fixed landing stations. These stations perform two critical functions. First, if the destination is beyond a single charge, they extend the drone’s range by swapping out a dead battery for a fresh one. Second, they allow the drone to plan its flight path in advance and map out obstacles in detail.

Because drones can't yet sense and avoid obstacles—trees, power lines, people—guidance from ground stations and fixed flight paths make for safer autonomous flights. Also, the drones remain connected to central guidance software in the cloud, maintaining (or altering) their trajectory throughout a flight.


https://youtu.be/nl9DviYWRs8
Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#17
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By the way, you know what that article said about how drones can't recognize objects? Yeah, about that...

Smart drones that think and learn like us to launch this year

Mini drones with neural hardware that works like a brain could be in the skies within months – and carry out door-to-door deliveries or monitor crops

THAT drone buzzing round your head might be smarter than you think. Small drones with neural hardware resembling brains will soon share airspace with other aircraft, seeing and avoiding potential hazards autonomously. The ability will help drones take on a host of new roles.

Big firms like Amazon, DHL and Google are developing their own drone fleets for rapid delivery of consumer goods, fast food and pharmaceuticals. However, current rules restrict drones to flying within visual range of a human operator because of the risk of collision. Drones need an automatic "sense-and-avoid" capacity before they will be able to make deliveries on their own.

Computers capable of recognising objects in video and responding in real time are too big and too power-hungry for small drones. That means drones have to rely on short-range sensors like radar, which may not give enough warning to avoid a collision.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#18
wjfox

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Drone 'containing radiation' lands on roof of Japanese PM's office

Wednesday 22 April 2015 12.00 BST

Japanese authorities have launched an investigation after a small drone reportedly containing traces of radiation was found on the roof of the prime minister’s office, sparking concerns about drones and their possible use for terrorist attacks.

No injuries or damage was reported from the incident on Wednesday. The prime minister, Shinzo Abe, who is at present in Indonesia, works at the building during the day and commutes from his own private home roughly 15 minutes away.

Police said it was not immediately known who was responsible for the drone.

Read more: http://www.theguardi...inisters-office


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#19
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DRONES MAKE GOOD JOGGING COMPANIONS, RESEARCH FINDS

 

Having trouble getting motivated to jog? What if, to help you along your way, there was a flying robot always a few steps ahead of you, its mechanical hovering body an exercise in technologically advanced mockery? Researchers Floyd Mueller and Matthew Muirhead at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia designed and built a system that lets joggers run with a quadcopter flying along for encouragement

Presented at the Computer-Human Interaction Conference in Seoul, the paper detailed a study where 13 casual joggers followed a drone on a 25 minute course. The drone flew a preset path along waypoints, and provided companionship to the joggers in a way similar to a running buddy or a dog. Much of the work of the researchers was configuring the drone so that it would work best as a companion. The quadcopter was programmed to fly 13 feet ahead of the joggers, though without sensors the quadcopter instead relied on the joggers’ pre-submitted track speed and flew approximately in front of where it was supposed to be.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#20
matthewpapa

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Just built my first drone.

IMG_20150428_203651.jpg?itok=E2cizQQH

 

It was about $250 all said and done. Lots of up front costs, so if I were wanting to build another it would be cheaper the second time around. Assembly is super easy assuming you are comfortable soldering and have a good iron.

 

Check out my parts list here:

http://mattpapageorge.com/?q=node/7

 

I am using a CC3D controller right now, This is simple RF control. But I plan to move to Pixe that has fully autonomous operation.

I have a gopro clone in the mail right now that I plan to mount. Currently I am using a simple VGA IP camera

 

If there is interest I can post instructions


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