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Drones & UAVs News and Discussions


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#21
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FAA trials show willingness to let drones fly out of sight of operators

The US Federal Aviation Administration has taken one step back from earlier opposition to letting drones fly when pilots can't see them.
Drones, also called unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or unmanned aircraft systems (UASs), are a hot item in technology circles. Entrepreneurs and big businesses want to use drones for chores like taking real estate photos and shooting movies.
But some other uses, like checking miles of oil pipeline or delivering packages, require drones to fly beyond operators' sight. That wouldn't be allowed under the draft drone regulations the FAA proposed in February.
On Wednesday, though, the FAA announced industry partnerships that signal the agency could be willing to let drone operators stretch their wings more. The projects will evaluate drones operated beyond the pilot's line of sight, with drone maker PrecisionHawk testing the aircraft for crop monitoring and BNSF Railroad exploring what's necessary to control drones used to inspect railroads.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

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The 9 Strangest Flying Robots from the World’s Biggest Drone Show


In the past year, drones have crashed onto the White House lawn, hauled radioactive cesium to the roof of the Japanese prime minister’s Tokyo office, and swooped above battlefields in Iraq and Ukraine. The future of drone design is an area with huge importance for companies and for the military. At the recent Unmanned Systems 2015 show in Atlanta, Georgia, that future was on display.
Hosted by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, the show brought together drone makers, military types, and business leaders from around the globe. (Google founder Larry Page was spotted briefly on the showroom floor.) All were looking for the next thing in UAV design. Here’s a look at some of the most interesting, innovative and outlandish drones Defense One ran across.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#23
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US Special Forces Are Experimenting With Bug Drones
 


As intelligence, reconnaissance, and surveillance needs grow, devices are shrinking. 

If you hear this tiny flying bug drone buzzing around your head, an Army Special Forces team might not be far behind. The 18-gram PD-100 Black Hornet from Norway’s Prox Dynamics can bear regular and thermal cameras about a kilometer and stay aloft more than 25 minutes.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#24
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Drones hunt illegal logging in Amazon rain forests

by Steve Dent | @stevetdent | June 7th 2015 at 6:05 am

Drones have seen a lot of bad press and idiotic hype that has slowed their acceptance by regulators and the public. But let's not forget that they perform valuable services like search and rescue and inspection that can't be done any other way. A great example of that is work being done by the Amazon Basin Conservation Association in Peru, as detailed by NPR. Using a custom UAV, the group is scanning large sections of the rain forest in search of illegal logging and mining that has reduced thousands of acres to bare soil.

Read more: http://www.engadget....kusaolp00000595


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#25
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Networks of cargo drone stations would transform the logistics of Africa, carrying medium-sized loads of essential goods to isolated communities without need for roads.

Unmanned aerial vehicles have populated both the imagination and nightmares of people around the world in recent years. In April, the United States Navy announced an experimental program called LOCUST (Low-Cost UAV Swarming Technology), which officials promise will “autonomously overwhelm an adversary” and thus “provide Sailors and Marines a decisive tactical advantage.” With a name and a mission like that – and given the spotty ethical track record of drone warfare – it is little wonder that many are queasy about the continued proliferation of flying robots.
But the industrial use of the lower sky is here to stay. More than three million humans are in the air daily. Every large human settlement on our planet is connected to another by air transport. DJI, a Chinese UAV manufacturer, is seeking a $10 billion valuation. Cargo drones will grow into an even larger industry in the coming years, simply because, unencumbered by the weight of humans and their life-support systems, they will fly more cheaply but be just as fast and safe.


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#26
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The underground world of drone racing in Australia

There is an underground scene of drone racers in Australia, who are meeting up in rundown warehouses in the fringe suburbs of cities.

On June 6, a race was held in the old Bradmill Warehouse on the outskirts of Melbourne. The competitors– FinalGlideAus, Strepto, Daz, Covert and SD– have purpose-built quadcopters and wear specialised goggles allowing them to compete in the race from “first person view” (FPV).

Many of the drones, are “blinged” up with LED accessories and lights, making for a race of geeked-out, adrenaline-pumping goodness. And this scene is playing out across Australia.
The drones zoom around the urban courses– such as go-cart tracks, warehouses and farms– at speeds of up to 60km/h, with up to 30 people attending race meets. They typically start at 10 a.m, and include five hours of practice to get used to the track and then an hour race.

As the multi-rotor racing scene begins to gain traction, the company QAROP has introduced the first legal drone racing league within Australia, organising meet-ups and race days for enthusiasts across the country.

The drones are ready to race.

 
 


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Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#27
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Amazon To Congress: Drone Delivery Aircraft Ready Within A Year

Senior officials from Amazon and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) testified before Congress yesterday on the feasibility of using drones for commercial purposes—and it turns out Amazon could be making drone deliveries within the year. Not only that, but the e-commerce company wants to deliver products within 30 minutes using the small, unmanned aircraft.
Michael Whitaker, the FAA’s deputy administrator, said the agency expects to formalize regulations for commercial drones within 12 months. This is a huge change; commercial drone regulations for purposes such as delivery and filming major sports events were not expected until 2016 or 2017 at the earliest. "The rule will be in place within a year," he told the House of Representatives’ Oversight and Government Reform Committee.


3047567-poster-p-1-amazon-to-congress-dr


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
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#28
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Wedding videographer using drone during a shoot:

 

http://i.imgur.com/Uf5fc7W.gifv

 

 


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#29
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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#30
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The Sky's Not Your Lawn: Man Wins Lawsuit After Neighbor Shotgunned His Drone

Comments section tough guys and fictional sitcom characters like Ron Swanson have popularized the idea that it's completely acceptable to shoot a drone out of the sky. As one man in California recently learned, it's not: A judge just awarded a drone pilot $850 in a lawsuit related to the shotgunning of his custom-built drone.
Way back in November, I was contacted by a man who said his drone had just been shot while flying over his parents' farm. Before talking on the record to the press, he wanted to get the case settled either with his neighbor or with the legal system. In late May, his case was finally finished—the first lawsuit relating to the destruction of a drone to become public.

"It didn't occur to me to set a precedent," Eric Joe, the pilot, told me. "I didn't want to go down this route, I wanted to get it resolved civilly, but that didn't work out."


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#31
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How drones could replace workers on American farms

Mike Geske wants a drone.
Watching a flying demonstration on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, the Missouri farmer envisions using an unmanned aerial vehicle to monitor the irrigation pipes on his farm – a job he now pays three men to do.
“The savings on labor and fuel would just be phenomenal,” Geske says, watching as a small white drone hovers over a nearby corn field and transmits detailed pictures of the growing stalks to an iPad.
Nearby, farmer Chip Bowling tries his hand at flying one of the drones. Bowling, president of the National Corn Growers Association, says he would like to buy one for his Maryland farm to help him scout out which individual fields need extra spraying.

Another farmer, Bobby Hutchison, says he is hoping the man he hires weekly to walk his fields and observe his crops gets a drone, to make the process more efficient and accurate.

“I see it very similar to how I saw the computer when it first started,” says Hutchison, 64. “It was a no-brainer.”

Farmers are eager for the technology.


Farmers are eager? I sure would be, if I knew I'd be getting some compensation.


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#32
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Drones Likely to Drive American Farmhands to Unemployment Sooner Than We Think

Are drones putting blue collar jobs at risk?
The increasing problem of technology automating humans’ jobs is a topic the Observer has covered time and time again. From autonomous driving systems taking over for truck and taxi drivers to the increasing number of fully functional automatic bank tellers, it’s a problem raising concern among many.
The latest blue-collar workers fearing digital replacement are farmhands. The enormous financial savings farmers could see by using drones are making the technological switch more and more attractive, and it’s only a matter of time before it hits all farms nationwide.
It turns out that agriculture is shaping up to be one of the biggest markets for drones. The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International says agriculture could account for 80 percent of all commercial drone use, according to U.S. News.
Drones’ uses on farms are practically limitless. For one, they’re game changers for transmitting detailed data about crops back to the farmers. 3D images of plants, thermal readings and other information can be collected and relayed back to the farmers with drones in only minutes or hours—a process that usually takes days and is incredibly limited regarding what data can be collected. Drones can also easily direct farmers to problem areas and even help them to decrease the amount of water and chemicals needed in certain areas.
In a recent PBS Newshour segment, the network talked to farmers and found they’re ready to embrace the technology.

gettyimages-458104118.jpg?w=635&h=423

Farmers are ready to embrace the technology. (Photo: Getty)


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
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#33
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Switzerland begins postal delivery by drone

Switzerland’s postal service said on Tuesday it had begun testing parcel deliveries by unmanned drones, although widespread use of the flying postmen is not likely to kick in for another five years.
Postal service executives showed off the drones for the first time on Tuesday and said initial tests of the machines’ post-delivery abilities would run until the end of July.
The snow-white drones consist of four branches with propellers on the end extending from a hollow ring the size of a toilet seat. A yellow box, bearing the postal service logo, is lodged in the middle.
“The drone has an extremely light construction and is capable of transporting loads of up to one kilo over more than 10 kilometres with a single battery charge,” Swiss Post said in a statement.

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Swiss Post stressed the drones would be thoroughly tested before being put to wide-scale use. Photograph: Jean-Christophe Bott/EPA


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#34
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#35
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Sensors and drones: hi-tech sentinels for crops

Sensors and drones can be among the farmers' best friends, helping them to use less fertilizers and water, and to control the general condition of their crops. Nowadays Piedmont, in north western Italy, is an open air laboratory where companies and research centres are testing these tools to improve the health and productivity of different cultivations. Such as it happens in the small town of Agliano d'Asti, where the University of Turin, the research centre CSP and four wine cooperatives are testing a decision support system (DSS) based on wireless sensor networks, which helps agronomists to verify in real time if plants are enjoying good health.

id40556.jpg

Infrared imagine of an experimental field of wheat in Cigliano, near Vercelli. (Image: University of Turin, Faculty of Agriculture)


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#36
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This is old (4 years old in fact) but still cool

 


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
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#38
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Rural pop-up hospital gets America's first drone delivery


The first FAA-ok'd parcel delivery by drone took place in rural Virginia on Friday at Wise County, Virginia's annual Remote Area Hospital. The RAH pops up every summer in Wise, which is deep in Appalachia, as a makeshift field hospital that treats hundreds of uninsured area residents for free. This year, the event's organizers, Remote Area Medical, sought to explore the roles of emerging technology in humanitarian crises and, to that end, had Australian startup Flirtey drop off 10 pounds of supplies.


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#40
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Drone shooting: US home-owner faces charges

 

A man in the US has shot down a drone hovering over his back garden.

William Meredith, from Hillview, Kentucky, was subsequently arrested by police.

[...]

Mr Meredith explained that the drone was hovering above his neighbourhood. When it moved over his property, he shot it down.

Three shots from his Benelli short-barrel shotgun took the craft out of the sky.

"I went to my safe, retrieved my shotgun, went back out," he said. "I felt that I was well within my rights as an American citizen to defend my property."

 

Read more: http://www.bbc.co.uk...nology-33735048


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