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Drones & UAVs News and Discussions


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#61
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^Steampunk vs. cyberpunk: real life edition.
 
Anywho...
 

Drones learn to search forest trails for Bigfoot lost people

Researchers at the University of Zurich, the Università della Svizzera italiana, and the University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland have developed software enabling drones to autonomously detect and follow forest paths. With the new drones, missing persons can be found and rescued quickly in forests and mountain areas.

 
Every year, thousands of people lose their way in forests and mountain areas. In Switzerland alone, emergency centers respond to around 1,000 calls annually from injured and lost hikers. But drones can effectively complement the work of rescue services teams. Because they are inexpensive and can be rapidly deployed in large numbers, they substantially reduce the response time and the risk of injury to missing persons and rescue teams alike.
A group of researchers from the Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence and the University of Zurich has developed artificial intelligence software to teach a small quadrocopter to autonomously recognize and follow forest trails. A premiere in the fields of artificial intelligence and robotics, this success means drones could soon be used in parallel with rescue teams to accelerate the search for people lost in the wild.

droneslearnt.jpg

Using a new software drones detect forest paths and can follow these autonomously. Credit: UZH; USI; SUPSI
And Bigfoot.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#62
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https://www.ted.com/...s_of_the_future

 

Pretty neat Ted Talk demonstration of various new types of drones.


If you're wrong, how would you know it?


#63
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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#64
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Very cool, but I want to see an autonomous drone racing league. And an autonomous electric car Grand Prix.



#65
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DJI Phantom 4 announced

It can dodge obstacles, track humans and fly itself

When The Verge began covering “drones” three years ago, we got a lot of grief about using that word: drone. These were just remote control toys, they couldn’t fly themselves! When drones got smart enough to navigate using GPS, and to follow people around, the naysayers pointed out they still couldn’t see anything. It could follow you, sure, but not while avoiding trees. At CES the last two years we finally saw drones that could sense and avoid real-world obstacles. But those were just tech demos, R&D projects which so far haven’t been made commercially available.
That all changes today with the introduction of DJI’s new drone, the Phantom 4. It’s the first consumer unit that can see the world around it and adjust accordingly, the next big step towards a truly autonomous aircraft. Try and drive it into a wall, the Phantom 4 will put on the brakes. If you ask it to fly from your position to a spot across a river, and there is a bridge in between, it will make a judgement call: increase speed to clear the obstacle or, if that isn’t possible, stop and hover in place, awaiting your next command.
The Phantom 4 accomplishes this feat with the help of five cameras: two on the front and two on the bottom, plus the main 4K camera that has always been onboard to capture video. The images captured by these cameras are run through computer vision software which constructs a 3D model of the world around it that the drone can intelligently navigate.


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#66
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The First ‘World Drone Prix’ is Being Held in Dubai

If there was ever any doubt that drone racing would become a legitimate sport, it seems that there's no longer need to worry. Dubai is now playing host to the first World Drone Prix.


RACING GLORY
As the world continues to get into the whole drone hype, Dubai has just announced that they are now welcoming over 100 teams set to participate in the world’s first World Drone Prix on March 11.
The gathering shines a light on the global effort to establish drone racing as a serious sport. And with Dubai—home of the Formula 1 races—playing host to the event, it certainly gives the World Drone Prix an unprecedented level of cachet.
The Drone Prix will bring competitors to Dubai on March 7 to 8 for the qualifiers, where the top 32 will move up to the actual race to be held on March 11 and 12.
The prix itself will see drone fliers pitted against each other, in races with speeds of over 100 kilometers per hour (62 mph). The aerial race course boasts a length of 591 meters (1938 feet), and claims to be the world’s first race course purpose-built for drone racing.
The race will consist of avoiding various obstacles and completing the course in the fastest time, in a very video game-like fashion; it even includes shortcuts that can shave a few seconds off the participants’ final time, if they have the skill and courage to attempt them.

dubai-world-drone-prix-ed.jpg

March 11th... that's today!
 
Also, of fucking course it would be held in Dubai.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#67
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Night-Flying Drones Fight Poachers in Africa

Mar 9, 2016 12:00 PM

A night-flying drone is taking on wildlife poaching in African nations.

The innovative Air Shepherd, sponsored by the Lindbergh Foundation, uses unmanned aerial drones to expose illegal hunting and help re-establish stability in the tourism industry, gravely impacted by the deaths of wild animals.

“Poachers, operating under the cover of darkness, have been impossible to find … until now,” according this rather persuasive video from the Lindbergh Foundation.

Flying silently and invisibly, the drones track both wildlife and the movement of hunters, relaying information to ground enforcement teams, who can then intercept poachers before any slaughter takes place.

 

http://news.discover...rica-160309.htm


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#68
caltrek

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Drone Sales in Middle East Countries

 

http://www.thenation...y-drives-demand

 

 

 

While the UAE does not divulge its military budget, the country yesterday signed defence deals worth more than Dh767 million during the second Unmanned System Exhibition (Umex) in Abu Dhabi. Among the winners was state-owned Abu Dhabi Auto­nomous Systems Investments, or Adasi.

Brigadier General Rashid Moh­ammed Al Shamsi, the chairman of the higher organising committee of Umex, said he expected higher sales at this year’s event compared with last year’s show, which was held alongside the International Defence Exhibition (Idex). The UAE’s military and defence spending power is unlikely to be affected by the drop in oil prices, exhibitors said.

For the Abu-Dhabi-based private group Adcom Systems, the business of UAVs is booming, with year-on-year sales growing fourfold, according to its chief executive, Ali Al Dhaheri.

The big demand for drones and associated equipment is driving the company to look for new locations for large-scale production in places such as India, the UK and Egypt.

“In this coming year, it [sales] will be outstanding because of the situation in the Middle East,” said Mr Al Dhaheri. “You see the American trend and the international trend is going for unmanned aircraft.”

The company’s drones are used for military and commercial operations.

The US defence company Lockheed Martin is holding talks with Saudi Arabia and the UAE to sell its range of drones, said Frank Crisafulli, the head of international development ship and aviation systems.

“Demand in the GCC is high because of the geopolitical events happening right here,” said Mr Crisafulli. “The commercial market is going to be the highest-growing market in the Gulf region, but the dollar amounts are in the military.”

Denel, South Africa’s biggest defence equipment manufacturer, is also looking to sell its Seeker 400 UAV – an upgrade of its Seeker 200 – in the region.

“We definitely expect sales in the region,” said Sepanki ­Pheto, the business development manager for North Africa and Middle East at Denel Dynamics, a unit of Denel.

“Reconnaissance is necessary in the region because of all the instability that is happening.”

For the Sharjah-based boat manufacturer Al Marakeb, unmanned surface vehicles (USV) production is expected to rise by 15 per cent a year for the next three years after a joint venture with US-based defence company Raytheon was announced under an offsets programme from the Abu Dhabi-based and state-owned investment company Tawazun.

Under the joint venture, Al Marakeb will build the USVs and Raytheon will provide the sensors and technology.

The company, which is targeting sales in Mena and the Far East, expects 70 per cent of the sales to come from military organisations such as the coastguard and the rest from companies including those in the oil and gas sector.​

“A navy, an oil company or any security asset, they are buying boats anyway,” said Basel Shuhaiber, the managing director of Al Marakeb. “These [USVs] are just more economical because you are reducing your operational costs.”

 

 &NCS_modified=20160307051916&MaxW=640&im

Above, a United 40 drone at Adcom Systems' stand, an Abu Dhabi company based in Musaffah which has been producing unmanned target-training drones since the 1990s. Reem Mohammed / The National


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#69
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I normally do not like to pass on advertisements, but this does illustrate how commercial drones are becoming.

 

http://fullthrottlel...DroneNormal1102

 

 

  • Drones are more affordable than ever. They come in an array of shapes and sizes and many of them are fitted with cameras that allow someone to take some great photograph that would be otherwise unattainable. People can now take excellent photos from unique points of view while they are on vacation or traveling to remote locations. It’s common for a family to go on a trip without any other friends, and the family members want to be in all of the photos they take. A drone provides them with the ability to catch astonishing photos that contain every member of the family. When going into the mountains or to the beach, you may want to consider buying a drone to bring on the trip. Imagine how great it will be to fly the drone out over the water and capture pictures of your family standing on the shore. This would not be possible otherwise unless your family has a boat that one of the members can go into the water with and take the picture.
  • Catching a sunset from high above the dunes is sure to provide some excellent images that can be used for postcards or anything else you wish. The same can also be said of images taken in tree canopies; it will be much easier to capture images of wildlife by using a drone rather than trying to climb trees and risk scaring off the fauna. Many drones are quiet enough to sneak around the beach and capture images of wildlife that would otherwise be scared away by a human approaching them. It’s also common for people to find a great place where they can jump in the water from high spots.

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#70
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Watch a hydrogen-powered drone fly

BBC Click's Jen Copestake has been given exclusive access to the test flights of a drone powered by a hydrogen fuel cell.

Intelligent Energy's fuel cell can power a modified drone for up to two hours - about six times longer than the average with a normal battery.

Refuelling with compressed hydrogen takes a few minutes compared to recharging a battery.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...nology-35890486

 

2GFsWRH.jpg



#71
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A Drone Startup Just Conducted the First Legally-Sanctioned Urban Drone Delivery

IN BRIEF
A drone has successfully delivered a package to a residential location in a small Nevada town, marking the first fully autonomous urban drone delivery in the U.S.

ONE SMALL STEP FOR DRONES
To date, drones have displayed a number of awesome and exciting capabilities; however, real world applications have been a bit slow in coming. But now, one drone company may just have changed all that.
 
Drone startup Flirtey announced that it has successfully conducted the first autonomous urban drone delivery in the U.S. Done in Hawthorne, Nevada, Flirtey’s six-rotor drone flew about a half-mile along a pre-programmed delivery route on March 10th and lowered a package outside a vacant residence.
Staff members programmed the drone’s flight path using GPS. The package it carried contained a parcel of emergency supplies—including food, water, and a first-aid kit.
Flirtey had a drone pilot and visual observers on standby in case of problems, but the drone performed without a hitch.

54377e9d682b350f940f6a706700899e_tx600-1


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#72
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SCAMP Is a Robot That Can Fly…and Also Climb and Perch on Walls

IN BRIEF
A drone that can fly, perch, and climb on walls might be the future of surveillance drones for first responders and military.

SCAMP
While it looks nothing more than an unassuming quadcopter, Stanford’s SCAMP (Stanford Climbing and Aerial Maneuvering Platform) has a lot more tricks up it sleeve—this drone can not only fly, it can also perch, and climb on walls.
SCAMP basically takes everything the Biomimetics and Dexterous Manipulation Lab has learned from previous projects, such as the Stickybot (which mimics the gecko’s wall climbing capability), to create this new drone. The team modified the climbing technology applied on the Stickybot so that SCAMP could climb faster. To achieve SCAMP’s current maneuverability, they ensured it could take longer steps and added microspines to its feet—similar to what a praying mantis has.
To achieve its ability to perch, the climbing mechanism for the machine was placed on top of the quadrotor, which allows it to press against surfaces for better stability.
“It operates outdoors on rough surfaces like concrete and stucco, using only onboard sensing and computation. In this video, we show off some of SCAMP’s features, including new ones unique to its hybrid capabilities, like automatic recovery from climbing failure through timely application of rotor thrust,” the team details on their website.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#73
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Delivery Drones To Be Used in Rwanda to Ferry Medical Supplies

IN BRIEF
Drone technology is much more than just racing and surveillance. As one company is set to prove, it can also save lives via aerial deliveries.

POTENTIALLY LIFE-SAVING
The dawn of drones is ushering in a fundamental shift in how we do things—it’s affecting everything from lifestyle to privacy, logistics to entertainment. Yet one obvious (but largely untapped) potential use for unmanned aerial vehicles is its capacity to aid emergency services.
While not completely unheard of (there have been talks of using drone technology for search and rescue missions or combat poaching), this is the first time that its capability is actually going to be tested. And according to a recent announcement, Rwanda is going to be the first country that will make use of delivery drones to ferry medical supplies around the country.
Zipline, a drone startup, is behind the initiative, working in partnership with the Rwandan government.

zipline-delivery-drones.jpg
Image Credit: Zipline


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#74
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Drone racing goes mainstream as ESPN inks broadcast deal

Many casual observers realized drone racing had become a thing when they discovered last month that a British teen had landed prize money of $250,000 – yes, $250,000 – after winning the inaugural World Drone Prix event in Dubai.

The sport’s growing profile comes off the back of the rapid rise in popularity of remotely controlled quadcopters over the last 18 months or so. And while plenty of hobbyists are getting their kicks from grabbing stunning aerial footage with their camera-equipped drones, others have honed their flying skills to become expert racers, with many joining newly formed drone leagues across the country.
Now ESPN wants a piece of the action, on Wednesday announcing a multi-layer international distribution deal with the International Drone Racing Association (IDRA) that’ll bring live drone racing to our screens.

drone-racing-espn-0013-970x647-c.jpg

My commentary: Not gonna lie, I'd probably watch it. I gave a look at the Dubai race. Half an hour later, I realized I was late for class. So I think there's a market for it. At least there'll be one person watching it.


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#75
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Drone racing goes mainstream as ESPN inks broadcast deal

Many casual observers realized drone racing had become a thing when they discovered last month that a British teen had landed prize money of $250,000 – yes, $250,000 – after winning the inaugural World Drone Prix event in Dubai.

The sport’s growing profile comes off the back of the rapid rise in popularity of remotely controlled quadcopters over the last 18 months or so. And while plenty of hobbyists are getting their kicks from grabbing stunning aerial footage with their camera-equipped drones, others have honed their flying skills to become expert racers, with many joining newly formed drone leagues across the country.
Now ESPN wants a piece of the action, on Wednesday announcing a multi-layer international distribution deal with the International Drone Racing Association (IDRA) that’ll bring live drone racing to our screens.

drone-racing-espn-0013-970x647-c.jpg

My commentary: Not gonna lie, I'd probably watch it. I gave a look at the Dubai race. Half an hour later, I realized I was late for class. So I think there's a market for it. At least there'll be one person watching it.

 

 

I was about to post this as well anyway, It looks really enjoyable to play and watch.


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#76
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Drone Swarms Will Soon Be Used for Search-and-Rescue Operations

In 2010, Haiti suffered a devastating 7.0 magnitude earthquake that decimated much of its infrastructure and left many under rubble. An extraordinary group of 62 teams approaching some 1,800 people were able to rescue 132 victims in an 11-day period, and while those efforts are amazingly commendable, there’s a future in which drones could assist in those missions.

But not just one drone: Imagine a swarm.
“Imagine having a large area that you should monitor as fast as possible looking for survivors or victims. Using many UAVs instead of a single drone helps you a lot in this case,” Carmine Recchiuto, a research fellow in the department of informatics, bioengineering, robotics, and system sciences (DIBRIS), at the University of Genova, tells Inverse. Indeed, you can adopt some strategies for terrain-covering that involve a cooperative behavior between the robots. They can share a common map, communicating to each other the position already monitored and choosing in real-time the next position to be visited.”

a-drone-flies-over-collapsed-buildings-d
A drone flies over collapsed buildings during removal operations on May 2, 2015 in Sankhu, Nepal.
It's been 6 years...?


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#77
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'Drone' hits BA plane: Police investigate Heathrow incident

A police investigation is under way after a passenger plane approaching Heathrow Airport flew into what is believed to have been a drone.

The British Airways flight from Geneva, with 132 passengers and five crew on board, was hit as it approached the London airport at 12:50 BST on Sunday.

If confirmed, it is thought it would be the first such incident in the UK.

BA said it would give the police "every assistance with their investigation". No arrests have been made, police say.

The Metropolitan Police said the plane was hit by the drone at about 1,700ft (580m) while flying over the area of Richmond Park, in south west London.

No debris has been found and police have asked for anyone who finds drone parts in the Richmond area to come forward.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-36069002

 

 

_89284230_planepa.jpg



#78
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Watch Intel Fly 100-Drone Army of Lights in a Remarkable Ballet

IN BRIEF
Despite strict regulations, Intel was able to obtain an exception from the FAA to fly 100 drones all at the same time. Amazingly, the drones were controlled by only four laptops.

BREAKING THROUGH REGULATIONS
For the first time on U.S. soil, 100 drones flew up all at the same time, synchronized to create a light orchestra in the sky. And the work required special approval.
According to Intel, “FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) drone regulations limit individuals and businesses from flying multiple drones simultaneously without special exemption. Since unmanned aerial systems (UAS) can pose risks to the busy and complex U.S. airspace, the FAA has taken incremental steps to address any hazards from the proliferation of drones.”
After working with the FAA by conducting several tests and providing walkthroughs of the technology used for Drone 100, Intel became the only company to ever receive a Section 333 Exemption for multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) per pilot, allowing them to launch 100 drones in Palm Springs, California.

1000 DRONES NEXT
The event, dubbed Drone 100, was held earlier this year at the Ahrenlohe Airfield in Germany, which broke the previous Guinness World Record of 50 unmanned vehicles in the air at a time. In collaboration with Ars Electronica Futurelab, Intel came up with a program that allowed the synchronized movements and light from the drones.
“We worked with the FAA, walked them through what our technology can do, step by step,” Natalie Cheung, drone product manager at Intel, says. Only four laptops were needed to control all 100 drones. And Cheung says demonstrating the full process including safeguards in automation and control played a huge role in gaining the exemption from the FAA.
Josh Walden, Senior VP and General Manager of the New Technology Group at Intel, says they intend to introduce Drone 100 for performing in stadiums and events where big populations turn up. He also says their vision is to stretch technology limits, as well as FAA regulations, to one day go from simultaneously controlling a hundred drones to a thousand over time.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#79
caltrek

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I shudder to think of an air force of drones and an army of robots overwhelming some poor Third World country whose leader is dumb enough to make it to the top of the international hit list, or who whines about needing help to win his (or her) civil war.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#80
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'Drone' hits BA plane: Police investigate Heathrow incident

A police investigation is under way after a passenger plane approaching Heathrow Airport flew into what is believed to have been a drone.

The British Airways flight from Geneva, with 132 passengers and five crew on board, was hit as it approached the London airport at 12:50 BST on Sunday.

If confirmed, it is thought it would be the first such incident in the UK.

BA said it would give the police "every assistance with their investigation". No arrests have been made, police say.

The Metropolitan Police said the plane was hit by the drone at about 1,700ft (580m) while flying over the area of Richmond Park, in south west London.

No debris has been found and police have asked for anyone who finds drone parts in the Richmond area to come forward.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-36069002

 

 

_89284230_planepa.jpg

 

FYI I believe they have now confirmed it was not a drone but a plastic bag


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