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Drones & UAVs News and Discussions


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#141
Sciencerocks

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Hybrid VTOL fixed-wing drone flies for 2+ hours
Loz Blain

Loz Blain21 minutes ago
 

 

The Volanti from Sydney-based Carbonix is a carbon composite drone with a 2.7-m (9-ft) wingspan that uses a multirotor system for VTOL, then transitions to horizontal flight as a push-prop fixed-wing once in the air. It flies for over two hours on electric power or seven with a gas pusher, and Carbonix hopes it will fill the industrial-grade niche in between hobby and military UAV gear.

 

http://newatlas.com/...rial-uav/48253/


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#142
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DJI proposes electronic accountability for drones
Ben Coxworth Ben Coxworth March 27, 2017

 

 

There may indeed be laws limiting the places in which aerial drones can be flown, but if someone sees a drone breaking one of those laws – particularly if it's from a distance – how do they know who's responsible? Drone manufacturer DJI has suggested a solution, in the form of what amounts to an "electronic license plate."

The idea is that all drones would come equipped with inexpensive radio equipment that transmits both their location and a user-specific identification code.

 

http://newatlas.com/...fication/48620/


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#143
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Drones cleared to carry lab samples between Swiss hospitals
Nick Lavars Nick Lavars March 31, 2017

http://newatlas.com/...ospitals/48718/
.

 

Swiss Post revealed last year that it had teamed up with California's Matternet to trial delivery drones, at the same time noting that it didn't expect any widespread use for around five years. We're not there yet, but things are moving along just nicely, with the Swiss aviation authority giving the green light for Matternet's drones to ferry laboratory samples between two hospitals in the city of Lugano

 


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#144
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#145
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The Federal Aviation Administration Faces Second Drone Audit

 

http://www.roboticst...ond_drone_audit

 

Introduction:

 

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is being audited for the second time by the Office of Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT IG) for its “approval and oversight processes” for drones.

 

The audit, which will begin in April 2017, will assess both the FAA’s processes for granting waivers and its “risk-based oversight” for entities that do have waivers under the Part 107 rulemaking for commercial drone operations. Specifically, the audit focuses on the waivers that permit drones to go beyond some of the basic limitations, including operating beyond line of sight or at night.

 

DOT OIG memorandum about the audit says it’s “important that FAA’s waiver approval process does not result in prolonged delays, especially for operations already considered to be a low safety risk by the agency.”

 

The DOT IG conducted an initial audit of the FAA’s drone processes in December 2016, concluding the FAA “lacks a risk-based oversight process for UAS.” According to the memorandum for this second audit, the DOT IG says “it is still unclear what type of oversight the FAA will provide for this new technology, as we found that FAA lacks a robust data reporting and tracking system for UAS activity, and aviation safety inspectors received limited training and guidance on UAS oversight.”

 

The FAA has processed nearly 800,000 drone registrations since December 2015 when mandatory registration took effect. To date, the agency has received more than 1,000 applications from UAS operators requesting exemptions to the basic requirements and has granted more than 300 of them. But, as the number of UAS operations increases, the IG noted, the number of drone sightings by pilots has also “increased significantly, thus presenting safety risks to manned aircraft.”

drone-market-forecast.jpg


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#146
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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#147
Sciencerocks

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Get aboard your drone – DJI unveils its own FPV goggles
Ben Coxworth Ben Coxworth April 24, 2017
 

 

If you own a DJI Mavic Pro, Phantom 4 series or Inspire series drone, there's now a new way of putting yourself "in the pilot's seat" of the aircraft. The company has announced the upcoming availability of its DJI Goggles, which among other things allow users to steer their drone via head movements.

As with other FPV (first-person-view) systems, the goggles display video streamed live from the drone's onboard camera. By bypassing the controller and receiving video straight from the drone, latency is kept down to as little as 110 milliseconds.

 

http://newatlas.com/dji-goggles/49184/


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#148
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New world record set for longest drone delivery
Michael Irving Michael Irving May 12, 2017
 

A future where drones drop off your online orders is another step closer this week after a new record was set for the world's longest drone delivery. On May 5, a fixed-wing HQ-40 UAV carried a package more than 97 miles (156 km), under the watchful eye of the Nevada Institute for Autonomous Systems (NIAS).

 

Drones from companies like Amazon, 7-Eleven, Domino's and UPS have already taken to the skies to deliver packages and pizza to customers, but those trips are usually short, last-mile trials. The record-breaking UAV journey covered 97 miles from a location in central Texas to carry a pneumatic part to the city of Austin.

 

http://newatlas.com/...y-record/49497/


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#149
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AI-equipped drones taught themselves how to fly by crashing 11,500 times

You know the saying, “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again?” Well, it also counts for drones. At least, that is the takeaway message from a recent paper titled “Learning to Fly by Crashing,” published by roboticists from Carnegie Mellon University.  They subjected hapless drones to 11,500 collisions in 20 different indoor environments, spread over 40 hours of flying time, to prove it.
They did it for a good reason, too — and it is not because they have a whole lot of old quadcopters to get rid of before the start of the next academic year.


They could've avoided all this misery if only one of those asshole humans told them the secret of flight: you've got to learn how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#150
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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#151
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US drone registry axed
Nick Lavars Nick Lavars May 19, 2017

Seen as an unnecessary burden by some and a smart safety measure by others, the US government's mandatory drone registry certainly had the desired effect. Hundreds of thousands of hobbyists have now registered their devices with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). As it turns out, however, the whole thing wasn't well, entirely legal, with an appeals court today striking down the rule and leaving the registry seemingly dead in the water.

 

http://newatlas.com/...try-axed/49616/


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#152
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Drones and AI combine to combat poaching in southern Africa

"use of artificial intelligence software to quickly identify poachers and animals in drone footage, in an attempt to better protect elephants and rhinos."

Drones have the potential to play a big role in protecting endangered species, with a number of trials being conducted to investigate how small aerial surveillance aircraft can be used to combat poaching. The latest effort involves the use of artificial intelligence software to quickly identify poachers and animals in drone footage, in an attempt to better protect elephants and rhinos.
Developed by Neurala, the software will be used by the Lindbergh Foundation in its efforts to combat poaching. It's designed to keep an eye on video as it's streamed back to researchers from drones in the field and identify animals, vehicles and poachers in real time without any human input. The software can analyze regular or infrared footage, so works with video taken day or night.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#153
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Alphabet is making a drone-tracking system to one day manage a sky full of flying robots

Before thousands of drones hit the skies to make widespread package delivery a reality, there’s going to have to be some kind of air traffic control system to make sure drones can fly autonomously without colliding into each other.
Yesterday, the team from Project Wing — the experimental drone delivery project at Alphabet’s X “moonshot” umbrella organization — tested a new system to manage drone traffic.
Taking part in tests convened by NASA and the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, Project Wing conducted trials of its own drone traffic control platform at Virginia Tech, where the FAA has set up a test site for flying drones. Wing discussed the project in a blog post published today.
The problem of tracking and managing drone flights will be critical to figure out before drone delivery can come to fruition. Drones don’t take off and land from the same place on set routes — in the way airplanes use airports — but rather are supposed to work more like cars, going direct to and from homes and offices. Operators will need to know where other drones are flying in order to prevent collisions, as well as which areas to avoid and when, like if there’s a major sports event or a wildfire.


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
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#154
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Gasoline powered Drones that can stay aloft for five days
brian wang | June 12, 2017 |

 

MIT engineers has come up with a much less expensive UAV design that can hover for longer durations to provide wide-ranging communications support. The researchers designed, built, and tested a UAV resembling a thin glider with a 24-foot wingspan. The vehicle can carry 10 to 20 pounds of communications equipment while flying at an altitude of 15,000 feet. Weighing in at just under 150 pounds, the vehicle is powered by a 5-horsepower gasoline engine and can keep itself aloft for more than five days — longer than any gasoline-powered autonomous aircraft has remained in flight, the researchers say.

The team looked into the idea and analyzed the problem from multiple engineering angles, they found that solar power — at least for long-duration emergency response — was not the way to go.

 

https://www.nextbigf...-five-days.html


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#155
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Practical flying air taxi using current tech and twice as safe as driving
brian wang | June 12, 2017 |

SureFly is a personal helicopter/VTOL aircraft designed for safe and easy flight. With eight independent motors each driving a single carbon fiber propeller, a backup battery power system, and a ballistic parachute to safely land in the event of emergency, the SureFly provides unparalleled safety for a personal aircraft.

SureFly is changing the helicopter industry. Now is the time to discover the affordable, easy-to-pilot, safe answer to personal flight.

 

https://www.nextbigf...as-driving.html


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#156
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Would've posted this earlier had I not randomly been locked out of my account for some reason. But anyway...how very futuristic this is. But of course, it makes sense when you stop to think about it.

 

Drones carrying defibrillators could aid heart emergencies

 

CHICAGO - It sounds futuristic: drones carrying heart defibrillators swooping in to help bystanders revive people stricken by cardiac arrest.

Researchers tested the idea and found drones arrived at the scene of 18 cardiac arrests within about 5 minutes of launch. That was almost 17 minutes faster on average than ambulances - a big deal for a condition where minutes mean life or death.


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#157
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What a great idea...

 

Maybe for old people they'd be able to simply press a button and the drone would come within a few minutes and for everyone else the people at the emergency call center could do it.

 

Every few miles we could place a drone station that would be the landing and charging station for the drone.


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#158
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Dutch firm aims to deliver first flying car in 2018
June 19, 2017 by Jo Biddle
A prototype of a Dutch flying car at the headquarters of the PAL-V firm, which is aiming to deliver its first car in 2018.

From "The Jetsons" to "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang", flying cars have long captured the imagination.

 

While several futuristic projects are under way in different countries, a Dutch design may be the first one sold and soaring into the skies.

After years of testing, the PAL-V company aims to pip its competitors to the post. It is poised to start production on what they bill as a world first: a three-wheeled gyrocopter-type vehicle which can carry two people and will be certified for use on the roads and in the skies.

"This kind of dream has been around for 100 years now. When the first airplane was invented people already thought 'How can I make that driveable on the road?'," chief marketing officer Markus Hess told AFP.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...ms-car.html#jCp

 

I'll believe it when I see it.


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#159
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Dutch firm aims to deliver first flying car in 2018
June 19, 2017 by Jo Biddle
A prototype of a Dutch flying car at the headquarters of the PAL-V firm, which is aiming to deliver its first car in 2018.

From "The Jetsons" to "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang", flying cars have long captured the imagination.
 
While several futuristic projects are under way in different countries, a Dutch design may be the first one sold and soaring into the skies.
After years of testing, the PAL-V company aims to pip its competitors to the post. It is poised to start production on what they bill as a world first: a three-wheeled gyrocopter-type vehicle which can carry two people and will be certified for use on the roads and in the skies.
"This kind of dream has been around for 100 years now. When the first airplane was invented people already thought 'How can I make that driveable on the road?'," chief marketing officer Markus Hess told AFP.

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...ms-car.html#jCp
 
I'll believe it when I see it.

 

Think this post goes better in the Passenger Drones & Flying Cars News and Discussions thread. I was considering merging this thread with that one, but I added "flying cars" to its title instead. Hence why I say this.
 

This MIT-Designed Drone Can Fly for Days at a Time

MIT has been taking off in drone-related news lately. Just yesterday we published a story about their recent development of drones that could drive as well as fly, and now it seems they’re ready to impress us all over again. Back in May, a group of engineers at the Institute successfully launched their “Jungle Hawk Owl” drone (which has a 24-foot wingspan) from the back of a car. This thing can supposedly stay in the air for five days without the need to refuel. You may be asking yourself: how the hell is that possible? Are they using solar power to run this thing, especially considering the Chinese recently successfully tested a drone that could stay aloft for an entire day? Well, MIT was on the same page, but quickly ran into issues.
The U.S. Air Force challenged numerous teams at MIT to develop a solar-powered drone that could stay in the skies for several days at a time. The idea was to find a more modern alternative to weather balloons, which have been the standard for delivering vital information across disaster zones and other emergency scenarios for decades. But unlike an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), a weather balloon is at the whim of wind gusts and other harsh weather conditions, and not always reliable. The goal was to design the ultimate replacement—more resilient, more efficient, and more controlled.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#160
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Drone Age - Rise of the Flying Robots

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s—a drone, the invasive new species that’s making itself quite at home in the world of the 21st century. Though their explosion in popularity is fairly recent, drones have been around in one form or another for over 150 years. 
In 1849, the Austrian army got the clever idea of putting bombs in unpiloted balloons and using them as a means of warfare; ever since then, drone technology has only gotten better.
 
Today, drones are used for a staggeringly diverse number of applications, with every indication that they’ll become more ubiquitous and capable as time goes on.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!




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