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Drones & UAVs News and Discussions


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#161
Sciencerocks

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Swedish flying carpet goes electric
Paul Ridden Paul Ridden July 3, 2017

Around this time last year, we featured a crazy Swedish multirotor flying machine invented and flown by engineer Alex Borg from AmazingDIYProjects. At that time, the engineer was lifted off the ground by eight petrol-powered rotors, but earlier this year he abandoned the combustion engines in favor of electric motors. Lots of electric motors. And now his huge chAIR manned VTOL has taken off and lifted him skyward.

 

http://newatlas.com/...tor-vtol/50322/


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#162
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UPS drivers may tag team deliveries with drones

UPS drivers could one day have drones as their wingmen to make deliveries even faster.
The delivery giant tested drone delivery Monday in Florida, offering a reminder of UPS' interest in using new technologies to improve deliveries.
UPS used a new electric delivery truck with a drone launchpad atop it. Inside the truck, a driver loads a package into the drone's cargo bin. Then a section of the truck's roof slides backwards, so that the drone can take off.
After the drone lifts off, the human drives away to deliver a separate package. Then the drone and truck rendezvous at another location, where the drone is loaded with a fresh package. If implemented, that cycle could continue for a driver's entire shift, allowing UPS to deliver packages more efficiently and save on fuel.


  • Sciencerocks likes this
Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#163
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Hybrid Driving-Flying Robots Could Go Beyond the Flying Car

Whether they're swooping in to deliver packages or spotting victims in disaster zones, swarms of flying robots could have a range of important applications in the future

Whether they're swooping in to deliver packages or spotting victims in disaster zones, swarms of flying robots could have a range of important applications in the future, a new study found. The robots can transition from driving to flying without colliding with each other and could offer benefits beyond the traditional flying-car concepts of sci-fi lore, the study said.
The ability to both fly and walk is common in nature. For instance, many birds, insects and other animals can do both.
 
Robots with similar versatility could fly over impediments on the ground or drive under overhead obstacles. But currently, robots that are good at one mode of transportation are usually bad at others, study lead author Brandon Araki, a roboticist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and his colleagues said in their new study. 

Now, these scientists have developed flying cars that can both fly and drive through a simulated city-like setting that has parking spots, landing pads and no-fly zones. Moreover, these drones can move autonomously without colliding with each other, the researchers said. "Our vehicles can find their own safe paths," Araki told Live Science.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#164
Sciencerocks

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DroneSentry jamming system open for orders
Michael Irving Michael Irving July 5, 2017

Drones can go just about anywhere – which is a problem for airports, government facilities or anywhere that airborne intruders aren't welcome. In the past, net guns and drone-hunting eagles have been used to keep them at bay, but two new systems, soon to launch in the US, might offer more permanent protection. DroneSentinel will detect unauthorized UAVs and, if local laws allow, the companion DroneSentry system will jam their signals to ground them.

 

http://newatlas.com/...g-system/50361/


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#165
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Tilt-rotor hexacopter puts a new twist on drone orientation

Multicopter drones are breaking through the final restriction on their movement in the air: they no longer need to hover parallel with the ground. The Voliro prototype's six props can tilt 360 degrees, allowing a staggering 12 degrees of freedom in the air. It's mesmerizing to watch.
 
Last week we covered a cube shaped drone, whose ability to calculate the trajectory of a thrown ball and catch it mid-air overshadowed its other remarkable capability of flying and hovering in any orientation.

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The Voliro hexacopter's tilting rotors let it hover and fly in any orientation(Credit: Voliro)


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#166
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Super tiny drones will be made with computer chips that are 100 times more energy efficient

Engineers have worked made drones the size of a bumblebee and loaded them with even tinier sensors and cameras. Almost every part of a drone has been made smaller, except for the brains of the entire operation — the computer chip.
Standard computer chips for quadcoptors and other similarly sized drones process an enormous amount of streaming data from cameras and sensors, and interpret that data on the fly to autonomously direct a drone’s pitch, speed, and trajectory. To do so, these computers use between 10 and 30 watts of power, supplied by batteries that would weigh down a much smaller, bee-sized drone.
Now, engineers at MIT have taken a first step in designing a computer chip that uses a fraction of the power of larger drone computers and is tailored for a drone as small as a bottlecap. They will present a new methodology and design, which they call “Navion,” at the Robotics: Science and Systems conference, held this week at MIT.

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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#167
Sciencerocks

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World's fastest drone clocked at 163 mph
Nick Lavars Nick Lavars July 14, 2017

 

While the more familiar consumer drones can reach perfectly respectable speeds of 40 mph (64 km/h) plus, racing drones are another matter entirely. These rapid quadcopters are built purely for speed, and none more so than the RacerX which just claimed a Guinness World Record for the fastest ground speed by a remote controlled drone.

 

http://newatlas.com/...-fastest/50498/


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#168
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Spray-painting drones may soon beautify a construction site near you

Massive spray-painted murals are being planned for Berlin, Germany, and Turin, Italy. Rather than employ human interns to do the dirty work, it will be created by drones.
The aptly named Paint By Drone is the brainchild of Carlo Ratti, director of the MIT Senseable City Laboratory and founder of the Carlo Ratti Associati an innovation and design studio leading the project.
“Drones are becoming an increasingly common part of our everyday life,” Ratti told Digital Trends. In the United States, the Federal Aviation Administration estimates that 1.3 million quadcopters will by in the skies by 2020.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#169
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Apple is Grounding Drones Flying Over New Headquarters

Apple has always been among the most secretive tech brands. While some companies will send out leaks to drum up attention, Apple is already the most watched company. We have previously reported how CEO Tim Cook is obsessed with keeping products under wraps.
Call it paranoia or a wise move, either way, Apple is ramping up its secrecy. The company is now clamping down on overflying drones around its Apple Park campus in California. According to Apple Insider, security guards are tasked with telling drone operators that UAVs cannot be used in the airspace around the campus.
It is hardly a surprise the company would do this. Not even to just protect secrets, but to also keep out the media.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#170
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The Air Force Wants Permission to Shoot Down Civilian Drones

The head of the U.S. Air Force's Air Combat Command wants permission to deal with civilian drones—including shooting them down—that threaten to interfere with flight operations. Two recent incidents, one involving an F-22 Raptor, have shown the military to be relatively defenseless against this potentially expensive nuisance.
General James Holmes, the head of Air Combat Command, was quoted by Aviation Weekdescribing two recent incidents. In one, an F-22 Raptor coming in for a landing nearly collided with a small, commercial unmanned aerial drone. The same week, Air Force security personnel watched as a civilian drone flew over the base perimeter and along the flight line before disappearing.
 
Flying drones over air bases in the United States is already illegal, but actually taking action against them, including disabling or shooting them down, is a federal matter and currently only federal civilian agencies can jam drones.


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#171
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Zap 'em outta here! We're gonna use those lasers -we have the biggest, shiniest lasers, let me tell you- and get those bad guys outta our air space. 


If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#172
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The UK government plans to start making drone owners take safety tests

The proposals come after a number of near misses with larger aircraft in the sky

The UK government is preparing to get a lot stricter on drones as their increasing popularity raises a number of safety concerns.
Citizens that own drones weighing more than 250g (80z) may need to register their drone and attend safety awareness courses under new government rules announced on Saturday. The proposals come after a number of near misses with larger aircraft in the sky. 
The Department of Transport did not specify when the new rules could be introduced or how exactly they would be enforced but it said the tests are designed to assess whether owners understand the safety, security, and privacy regulations.


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#173
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Drone Delivery Is Coming to Dubai by 2018

Drone delivery is coming to the Dubai, the largest city in the United Arab Emirates, as early as March of 2018, according to the Khaleej Times. Eniverse Technologies, an autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) delivery company led by CEO Mohammed Johmani, plans to cut delivery costs by 30-40 percent by switching from traditional truck delivery to drone delivery. According to a recent study The Drive reported on, this change will not only be economically beneficial for Dubai, but be far more environmentally friendly than the current standard of truck deliveries. 
According to the Khaleej Times, the required governmental approval process of corporate drone deliveries has been begun already and is expected to last 6 to 12 months, making March a pretty good estimate for when this could actually take off. Once the paperwork has been taken care of, deliveries will start to smaller neighborhoods. At first, there will be five UAVs at work, in the following districts: Emirates Hills, The Meadows, The Springs, The Greens, Jumeirah and Umm Suqeim. Once things run smoothly, Eniverse will expand their 5kg-maximum deliveries of goods to more areas. Not only that, but the expected increase of the drone fleet is currently at 100 vehicles.

k75xDTq.jpg


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#174
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Amphibious Drone
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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#175
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Here are six ways drones can help —and even save—the environment.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#176
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Hamburgers and beer are about to start flying through the skies of Reykjavík, Iceland

Drone delivery has taken another small step toward becoming a reality, thanks to a new trial taking place in Iceland. Israeli drone logistics company Flytrex has partnered with Icelandic on-demand goods service AHA to set up a small drone delivery route in Reykjavík.
Flytrex doesn’t make drones. Instead, it’s spent the past few years working on solving for the rest of the drone delivery equation. That involves working with local regulators (Icelandic Transport Authority, or Icetra, in this scenario), training employees, and most importantly, building a cloud-based network that the entire drone delivery system runs on.
As with most early drone delivery trial runs, there’s a catch: there’s only one delivery route right now, and the drone is currently only part of the equation. What Flytrex and AHA are doing is using a hexacopter (a modified DJI Matrice 600) to deliver food or other products directly across a bay of the North Atlantic Ocean that delivery drivers normally have to skirt around. Basically, someone at the AHA facility loads the delivery up on the drone, it skips over the bay, and the delivery person takes it from there. Deliveries that would have normally taken more than half an hour can now be made in a matter of minutes.


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#177
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Drones are Speeding Hurricane Harvey Response by 800%

The first step towards awarding payouts to insurance policyholders is assessing the damage done to their property. This is proving nearly impossible to manage on the ground level, since the areas subjected to Harvey’s attack are still dangerous and flooded.
Fortunately, drones are making it possible to speed up the insurance process. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) loosened its stance on the use of commercial drones in public areas in June 2016. Since then, thousands of drone professionals have signed up with FAA, allowing them to fly commercial drones in public.
The FAA has expedited approval for drone operators in Texas. By August 31st, the agency had provided clearance to 43 operators.
The FAA has placed flight restrictions on non-commercial drones within 100 miles of Houston through Tuesday, and 30 miles around Rosenberg through Sept. 30.


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#178
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The first autonomous drone delivery network will fly above Switzerland starting next month

Logistics company Matternet has announced a permanent autonomous drone network in Switzerland that will now see lab samples like blood tests and other diagnostics flown between hospital facilities, clinics, and labs. The first delivery network will be operational from next month, with several more to be introduced in the next year. Matternet says medical items can be delivered to hospitals within 30 minutes.
Matternet, based in Menlo Park, California, was granted authorization to operate its drones over densely populated areas in Switzerland in March and says that approval was a world first. Today, the company unveiled a Matternet Station; a kind of white, futuristic looking postbox with a footprint measuring about two square meters, that can be installed on rooftops or on the ground to send and receive packages by drone.


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#179
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Drone detects heartbeat and breathing rates

Researchers at the University of South Australia have developed drones that can remotely measure heart and breathing rates.

Image-processing systems combined with specially created algorithms allow the drones to detect vital signs in several people at once, while they are moving.

The drones could be deployed in nursing homes, on hospital wards and in war zones.

One expert said it could be "game-changing".


If you're wrong, how would you know it?


#180
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Boeing advances autonomous flight aspirations with Aurora acquisition
Aircraft
Nick Lavars

 

Boeing has been in the aviation game for more than a century, but the company's recent moves suggest it won't be resting on its laurels. Following the launch of its US$2 million personal flying machine contest, the company will acquire Aurora Flight Sciences, a company recently enlisted to work on Uber's flying taxi project.

Virginia-based Aurora focuses on building autonomous, electric propulsion aircraft, and its work in the area has attracted interest from some pretty big names. In 2016, DARPA awarded the company a contract to help develop its electric VTOL X-Plane. Then earlier in the year, Uber signed it up to work on its Uber Elevate Network, a bold scheme to add VTOL flying taxis to its on-demand transport service.

 

http://newatlas.com/...s-flight/51655/


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