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10 Years Ago

2006 2016 2000 2012 2000s

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#1
Yuli Ban

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https://www.reddit.c...like/?limit=500

 

Let's discuss it here, too!

 

What happened between the years 2000 and 2012 that don't feel like they happened that long ago, or feel like they happened much less recently than they were?


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#2
TranscendingGod

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Your mom and me. 

 

Edit: Sorry Yuli i feel mischievous today and sorta like a middle schooler.


The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#3
Yuli Ban

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Funnily enough, 10 years ago today, I was well within the second semester of 5th grade. 

 

 

Sigh... maybe one day, in the 2100s, I can relive those days...


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#4
Futurist

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https://www.reddit.c...like/?limit=500

 

Let's discuss it here, too!

 

What happened between the years 2000 and 2012 that don't feel like they happened that long ago, or feel like they happened much less recently than they were?

Bush's (2004) re-election, the Democrats' victory in the 2006 midterm elections, the 2008 Democratic primaries, and Obama's first (2009) inauguration. :)



#5
Yuli Ban

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The Robots Are Coming!
July 19th, 2005


For those of us begrudgingly driving our non-flying cars to work every day and being forced to take vacations in the Bahamas rather than on the moon, you may feel like science has let you down.
 
But fear not, because in a move that will certainly redeem the scientific community, leaps and bounds are being made in the world of domestic robots.
 
Not enough time to get all of your chores done? Need some help taking care of the kids for a few hours? Do you just want someone to listen?
 
Thanks to robotic vacuum cleaners, lawnmowers and companions, some companies are making sure that while we wait for our personal, nuclear-powered jet packs, we can at least get a Jetsons-style robot to take out the trash.
 
 
The Robot Home Invasion
 
Whether you realize it or not, robots are everywhere.
 
They build the cars that we drive and the computers we work on, they fight terrorists overseas and dispose of bombs, placing their own metal frames at risk while humans watch safely from a distance.
 
Though robots have long had a place in manufacturing and the military, they've only just begun creeping into our homes to play maid, gardener and pool boy.
 
"It's a relatively new market I think since about 2002, at least for consumer products," said Nancy Dussault, global marketing director for iRobot, makers of the Roomba robotic vacuum cleaner.
 
When the company launched the saucer-shaped machine, puzzled consumers often didn't know what it was. Some thought it was a scale, Dussault said. But now she notes there are over 1.2 million Roombas out there.
 
"A lot of it has to do with the right product, at the right time, at the right price," she said. "When you look at Roomba, it satisfied a need -- it vacuums and it does a very good job of it -- and it did it at a price point that people were comfortable taking a chance on it."
 
Now, Roomba has become a high-tech status symbol. "It's the only vacuum you pull out at a dinner party," she said.


I'm gonna go get my Roomba out of my closet. It's 10x more advanced than what these cavemen in 2005 had, and it's a really pathetic little thing. What am I gonna do with the Roomba? Show it this article.

 

I wouldn't show that Roomba to my drone!

 

 

Your mom and me. 

 

Edit: Sorry Yuli i feel mischievous today and sorta like a middle schooler.

It doesn't even make sense in context! Not grammatically either. So you basically failed 3 times.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#6
TranscendingGod

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The Robots Are Coming!
July 19th, 2005


For those of us begrudgingly driving our non-flying cars to work every day and being forced to take vacations in the Bahamas rather than on the moon, you may feel like science has let you down.
 
But fear not, because in a move that will certainly redeem the scientific community, leaps and bounds are being made in the world of domestic robots.
 
Not enough time to get all of your chores done? Need some help taking care of the kids for a few hours? Do you just want someone to listen?
 
Thanks to robotic vacuum cleaners, lawnmowers and companions, some companies are making sure that while we wait for our personal, nuclear-powered jet packs, we can at least get a Jetsons-style robot to take out the trash.
 
 
The Robot Home Invasion
 
Whether you realize it or not, robots are everywhere.
 
They build the cars that we drive and the computers we work on, they fight terrorists overseas and dispose of bombs, placing their own metal frames at risk while humans watch safely from a distance.
 
Though robots have long had a place in manufacturing and the military, they've only just begun creeping into our homes to play maid, gardener and pool boy.
 
"It's a relatively new market I think since about 2002, at least for consumer products," said Nancy Dussault, global marketing director for iRobot, makers of the Roomba robotic vacuum cleaner.
 
When the company launched the saucer-shaped machine, puzzled consumers often didn't know what it was. Some thought it was a scale, Dussault said. But now she notes there are over 1.2 million Roombas out there.
 
"A lot of it has to do with the right product, at the right time, at the right price," she said. "When you look at Roomba, it satisfied a need -- it vacuums and it does a very good job of it -- and it did it at a price point that people were comfortable taking a chance on it."
 
Now, Roomba has become a high-tech status symbol. "It's the only vacuum you pull out at a dinner party," she said.


I'm gonna go get my Roomba out of my closet. It's 10x more advanced than what these cavemen in 2005 had, and it's a really pathetic little thing. What am I gonna do with the Roomba? Show it this article.

 

I wouldn't show that Roomba to my drone!

 

 

Your mom and me. 

 

Edit: Sorry Yuli i feel mischievous today and sorta like a middle schooler.

It doesn't even make sense in context! Not grammatically either. So you basically failed 3 times.

 

The fact that you think that it was supposed to make sense is... a fail.


The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#7
Yuli Ban

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The Dawn of Intelligent Machines
March 25, 2005


Jeff Hawkins, the inventor of the Palm and the Treo, is finally doing something interesting with his life. He is figuring out how to build machines that he believes will truly work like the human brain. To put his theories into practice, he's once again teaming up with his longtime business partner from his Palm and Handspring days, Donna Dubinsky, to start a new company called Numenta. What will Numenta do? It will translate the way the brain works into an algorithm that can run on a new type of computer.
 
The problem with attempts to create artificial intelligence so far is that they equate intelligence with processing power. But the brain does not work like a computer. To create an intelligent machine, you first have to understand how the brain works. If you do that, you'll be able to create a machine with real, not artificial, intelligence -- a machine that thinks the same way you or I do.
 
On Monday, in the single most fascinating presentation at the PC Forum tech conference, Hawkins explained his theory of the brain. "I brought my brain," he told the audience, holding up a plastic model of a human brain. The part of the brain he is actually interested in is the neocortex, the convoluted, pink, spongelike part that's wrapped around the "reptilian" parts of the brain like the hypothalamus, the amygdala, and the hippocampus. It's the part of the brain where intelligence resides (as opposed to the parts that, for instance, control body functions). "If I were to take your neocortex out of your head and iron it flat, it would look like this," said Hawkins, holding up a dinner napkin representing the 30 trillion cells that make up the neocortex. "In those cells and connections, you store everything you know."
 
Then came the whopper: "We now understand how to build a machine based on the neocortex."
 
The neocortex is a memory system, according to Hawkins, who for the past 25 years has pursued a serious sideline as a brain researcher. (He recently wrote a highly readable and incisive book called On Intelligence that explains his theories.)
All the brain does is store and recall patterns. Every sensory input -- whether sight, sound, touch, taste, or smell -- is translated into a sequence of patterns that is stored in the neocortex. "Through exposure," Hawkins explained, "it builds a model of the world. The point of this model is when you come across new things every moment of your waking life, it looks at the previous stored experiences and then predicts what will happen in the future." The way it remembers the past, then, is as a sequence of patterns, stored as connections hardwired between brain cells.
 
If you step off a plane in a new city and walk through the terminal, your brain will compare that terminal to others you've been to before and will predict that when your foot hits the carpet it will encounter a firm surface that will support your weight. If your foot slips through the carpet and you fall into a vat of chocolate pudding, you will be surprised. If the carpet sprouts tentacles and grabs your leg, you will be surprised. If anything happens that is not consistent with your past experience of carpets in terminals, you will be surprised. That's because your brain is always predicting what will happen next based on what has happened in the past. The last time you were in a terminal, your foot hit the carpet, then you took another step, and another, and another, all without incident. Similarly, when you hear the opening bars of a familiar song, your brain anticipates what notes will come next because it is comparing what it hears to the stored pattern of the entire song. Intelligence, then, is pattern recognition. The brain is intelligent, Hawkins said, because "it lets you imagine the future."


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#8
Soundwave

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#9
Yuli Ban

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April 6th update: seriously, I can't remember half this stuff even though I was 12 years old at the time. Then again, half this stuff involves politics and economics, and I was 12 years old. So no wonder.
 
Jack Dorsey posts the first tweet ever: "just setting up my twttr" [10YA - Mar 21]

 

Ultimately the most important of any news on the first page, ironically. No one saw how big Twitter or social media were gonna get. MySpace was still the place of scenes 'n emos and crunk-obsessed twits.

 

 

Yeah, remember crunk music? And worse, crunkcore? No? Well too bad.

 

 

Aw my god, this needs to stop. It needed to stop the moment before I hit play.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#10
Yuli Ban

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Saddam Hussein is executed [10YA - Dec 30]


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.






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