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My very "hard" timeline of the future

timeline future accurate predictions

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#1
Jakob

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Unlike the one I'm developing in the fictional future section, this one is going to be very strictly based on current trends and actual research, which is why I'm putting this up here. Most of them have citations, which I'd be willing to provide on request. What I write here is actually how I think things will unfold, so feel free to critique for accuracy. No rule of drama or rule of cool here, it's all academic :)
 
2016-2020.
  • Augmented and Virtual Reality have become widespread.
  • Internet of Things is widespread.
  • Solar power begins taking off.
  • Printable organs are becoming commonplace.
  • Machine translation has been perfected.
  • OLEDs and electronic paper are commonplace.
  • There are more internet-connected devices than people.
  • ISIS is destroyed.
  • The first exaflop supercomputers are developed.
  • The US Navy begins adopting railguns on a large scale.
  • The FUTURE™ begins.
  • Drone ownership explodes.
  • James Webb Space Telescope launches, discovers thousands of exoplanets.
  • Photorealistic video games.
 
2021-2025.
  • The first self-driving cars arrive on the market.
  • NASA's Orion missions go beyond low-Earth orbit for the first time since Apollo.
  • China reaches superpower status.
  • DNA sequencing at birth becomes the norm.
  • Television technology has substantially improved, with holographic TV (holovision?), affordable ultra-thin 8k screens with OLEDs.
  • There are ten times as many internet-connected devices as people.
  • Powerful AI personal assistants are widespread.
  • Most affluent households have a 3D printer at home.
  • Almost all people on Earth have an internet connection.
  • The first electronic aircraft, and the return of supersonic civilian aircraft.
  • Search engines are replaced by knowledge engines.
  • The first laser guns are in use, again by the US Navy.
  • Generation Alpha ends.
  • The first primitive brain implants are developed.
  • VR-aided telecommuting becoming commonplace, allowing companies to hire the best and brightest from across the world. Many people entering the workforce are also choosing to be freelancers.
 
2026-2030.
  • NASA returns to the moon to establish a permanent lunar base. The Chinese space agency lands its first humans on the moon, as does SpaceX.
  • Commercial asteroid mining begins. This leads to the first trillion-dollar companies.
  • World population reaches 8 billion.
  • The European Union is beginning to fragment.
  • Japan is becoming a major naval power in Asia.
  • The first zettaflop computers are developed. Computers have enough processing power to simulate a human brain.
  • Next-generation body armor called "smart armor" in use. Basically smart armor is Internet of Things+powered exoskeleton.
  • Paper begins to be phased out of office environments.
  • The woolly mammoth is cloned (IT MUST HAPPEN ONE OF THESE DAYS!!!!1!)
  • The first nuclear fusion power plant.
  • The first private space station.
  • Fossil fuels begin to be phased out.
  • Vertical farms begin to become commonplace for some crops.
  • Electronic clothing is commonplace.
  • Security drones become ubiquitous in many cities.
  • Many of the worst symptoms of Alzheimers can be alleviated.
 
2031-2035.
  • The first of a series of international manned missions to Mars. More missions will be launched every two years until 2040.
  • Wireless electricity and smart grids are becoming mainstream.
  • Personalized medicine is becoming mainstream.
  • Mid-range cars are autonomous.
  • Traditional shopping has been rendered obsolete by 3D printing and drone delivery, which are nigh-ubiquitous.
  • Cash and credit cards become obsolete.
  • Technological unemployment beings causing major changes to the job market and economy. Low-level and mid-level jobs are rapidly disappearing, while high-level and intellectual jobs are opening up.
  • The first major hypertube transit system is constructed, high-speed maglev networks become widespread.
  • Automated examinations begin replacing routine doctor's appointments.
  • Most jobs require at least some knowledge of computer programming.
  • India is becoming a superpower.
  • Medical nanobots are in development.
  • Desalination plants are widespread.
  • Soft drugs have been legalized across most of the West.
  • A biotechnology revolution is underway.
 
2036-2040.
  • Lab-grown meat becomes commonplace.
  • 3D printing increases in scale, infrastructure improvement.
  • Climate change is wreaking havoc across the world, as numerous climate change refugees pour north, straining countries in temperate latitudes.
  • First mile-high skyscraper under construction in Dubai, containing carbon nanotubes.
  • Military nanobot swarms and nanoweapons appear on the battlefield.
  • First clinical trials in a cure for aging.
  • Multicellular organisms can be synthesized via ectogenesis.
  • The police and military begin making extensive use of robots, including humanoid robots in police and combat roles, and unmanned tanks and military aircraft guided by Tactical AIs.
  • Full Immersion Virtual Reality is developed.
  • Russia is a food superpower.
  • Blogger-journalist networks begin replacing traditional journalism.
  • Telepathic communication becoming a thing, via brain implants.
  • Most common cancers can be cured or prevented, thanks to personalized medicine and other biotechnology breakthroughs.
  • Extreme poverty (people living on less than $1.25/day)  has been reduced to nearly zero.
 
2041-2045.
  • Road and rail link across the Bering Strait.
  • A large, permanent base/colony on Mars is underway.
  • Cybernetic limbs begin edging past natural ones in quality, resulting in some people choosing to "go cyborg", i.e. have their body parts replaced with inorganic ones.
  • Genetically engineered designer babies are common for the wealthy.
  • World population is 9 billion.
  • Education has mostly moved to the virtual realm, with AI algorithms hand-picking classes of compatible students from around the world. Due to automation taking all the easy jobs, it has become highly intense and extremely competitive.
  • Technological unemployment is soaring, leading to a growing anti-AI sentiment.
  • Generation Beta ends.
  • The retirement age rises to 70, or even 75 in some sectors.
  • Food and water riots are commonplace, due to skyrocketing technological unemployment and climate change.
  • Many of the most powerful supercomputers are now quantum computers.
  • The death tolls of major killer diseases like malaria, AIDs, and influenza have been brought down to almost nothing.
 
2046-2050.
  • Invisibility suits in use by special forces.
  • Hypersonic air travel becomes commonplace for civilians.
  • Private citizens travel into low-Earth orbit more commonly, due to the increasing number of private space stations.
  • VR/AR contact lenses have succeeded clunky headsets like Oculus Rift.
  • Kinetic bombardment stations are launched.
  • Climate change continues to get worse and extreme weather becomes more and more common. In affluent countries, coastal cities begin building huge walls to keep out the sea.
  • Transhumanism as a movement begins to go mainstream. Certain segments of society, especially the aging Generation X, are not thrilled.
  • The first space-based solar power stations are launched.
  • Some corporations are beginning to use AIs to help them plot courses of action (though the AIs don't themselves run any companies).
  • First market applications of claytronics.

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#2
Guyverman1990

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Hmm, not bad at all.

 

Btw, why not some more prediction in the field of politics? eg. Which countries will gain independence or have regime changes?



#3
Jakob

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Hmm, not bad at all.

 

Btw, why not some more prediction in the field of politics? eg. Which countries will gain independence or have regime changes?

I don't really know much about politics, so I try to avoid too many of those to avoid making a fool of myself.

 

I guess I'll also note that probably some more bad things will happen between now and 2050, but disasters are much harder to tie a date to than technological breakthroughs.



#4
peaterlanster

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I hope u do more and how much research do u do before u post and u are very wise to stay away from politics 



#5
omega_tyrant

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Hmm. Where do you see aging treatments going after 2036-2040? 



#6
Guyverman1990

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I imagine the first successful fusion reactor being online the the 2030's, but I don't think it would become widespread until the decade after.

As for regime changes, the Saudi Dynasty might just go down If current trends keep on going for lowering oil prices.



#7
kjaggard

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Printable organs won't be a common thing in humans for more than a decade. They have to go through the clinical trial process and we've yet to print a full organ that was implanted in a human as part of a clinical trial.

 

What is a knowledge engine supposed to be? That seems like an empty prediction.

 

define brain implants. we already have primative brain implants and have had for years. they implanted devices that were like pace makers for brains of epileptics before the year 2000.

 

Laser guns are not practical weapons on a personal scale. vehicle mounted ones may be useful against people but still take more time and energy to effect damage than just shooting someone.

 

Your solar power and Blogger journalism are already happening now and becoming widespread won't take another decade for either.


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Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#8
Jakob

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Printable organs won't be a common thing in humans for more than a decade. They have to go through the clinical trial process and we've yet to print a full organ that was implanted in a human as part of a clinical trial.

I thought we'd printed simple organs already? I'd move it to the 2026-2030 bracket, but I can't edit my initial post.

 

 

What is a knowledge engine supposed to be? That seems like an empty prediction.

I was imagining something where instead of actually going to websites and the like, the search engine just gathers the data it thinks you want, from the sources it deems most reliable, and gives it to you. Like Google Knowledge Graph, but more powerful.

 

 

define brain implants. we already have primative brain implants and have had for years. they implanted devices that were like pace makers for brains of epileptics before the year 2000.

Huh. I remembered some site somewhere saying something to the effect of 'we'll have brain implants by 2020, but they won't be powerful enough to do much of anything'.

 

Laser guns are not practical weapons on a personal scale. vehicle mounted ones may be useful against people but still take more time and energy to effect damage than just shooting someone.

Of course, I meant ship-mounted laser guns, not personal ones (which won't come about until the last quarter of this century probably). According to Will's timeline (where I got that prediction from), they'll be replacing missiles not guns and their advantage will be cost.

 

 

Your solar power and Blogger journalism are already happening now and becoming widespread won't take another decade for either.

Solar power is still a pretty small thing (and we are in the 2016-2020 bracket currently, so it is indeed happening right now). Blogger-journalism exists but so does traditional journalism; I'm  talking about when the latter declines.

 

But thanks anyway for the suggestions.



#9
Yuli Ban

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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#10
matthewpapa

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Thanks for taking the time to create this Jakob

 

I have been saving a few of these as well as the main site here into a file sort of like a digital time capsule. I will hopefully be around to examine it in 20-30 years, should be great fun to read :)



#11
Zeitgeist123

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Hmm. Where do you see aging treatments going after 2036-2040? 

 

id be really frustrated if aging treatments still do not exist past 2030.


“Philosophy is a pretty toy if one indulges in it with moderation at the right time of life. But if one pursues it further than one should, it is absolute ruin." - Callicles to Socrates


#12
Guyverman1990

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Mind if I make a prediction of my own?



#13
Jakob

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I'll dump my new 2050s predictions here, until I decide to suck it up and buy my own domain name :p

 

Beyond 2050, this is pretty much wild guessing. Though I'll be assuming a capitalist anthropocentric expansionist future (which most of my future visions are) anyway.

 

2051 to 2055.

  • By the second half of this century, education has changed radically to address the continuing threat of technological unemployment. Schools have become extremely competitive, with extremely fast-paced and challenging curricula, and a heavy emphasis on STEM fields. The main focus of coursework--at least at the high school level--no longer has the memorization of specific facts in mind. Instead, it seeks to cultivate a general interest in sciences and learning, teaching students critical skills like research, creativity, critical thinking, and the scientific method. In essence, school teaches students *how to think*, in addition to teaching them more specific content based on their interests. Meanwhile, college has seen similar changes, though instead of teaching students how to think, it teaches them how to generate new knowledge, which is essentially the purpose of science. These changes prove necessary and have arrived none too soon, for STEM is one of the few remaining categories of viable careers, along with entertainment, business, politics, sports, and the military (the last of which, people are understandably hesitant to turn entirely over to machines).
  • A commercial anti-aging treatment reaches the market, based on telomere lengthening and other biological engineering techniques. It allows for an average lifespan of 110-115, though with a combination of health and good luck, one could reach 125 to 130. People area also able to maintain their physical peak for 10-15 years longer than before, until the age of 45 to 55 instead of 35-40. Currently, the procedure costs more than $40,000 per treatment and must be repeated annually, putting it out of reach for most. However, cheaper and less radical procedures are available to the lower and middle classes in first-world countries, raising life expectancy in those countries into the 90s.
  • Nuclear pulse propulsion begins making a massive comeback in the field of space exploration. This method of propulsion is extremely powerful, using the shockwaves of huge numbers of nuclear bombs to accelerate to breakneck speeds. This means that there is little or no concern for weight, allowing large interplanetary spacecraft that can carry dozens of people. The idea was conceived almost a century ago under Project Orion, but ultimately failed to gain the necessary government funding. By the early 2050s, however, private space exploration companies like SpaceX, which have become extremely wealthy from asteroid mining, begin to revive the idea. This will soon allow for the first manned missions to the outer Solar System: "Mars in two months, Jupiter in six" becomes an oft-repeated phrase in space laboratories worldwide. The nukes used are pure fusion bombs, which are both cleaner and more powerful that fission bombs.
  • As transhumans and cyborgs become more common, a rash of scandals begins involving "augmented" athletes having an unfair advantage over non-augmented opponents. Illegally augmented athletes turn up at nearly the Olympics throughout the 2050s, as well as at numerous other sporting events. These controversies make augmentation controversy the 2050s equivalent of today's steroid controversy, and many sports associations ban augmented athletes from the highest levels of competition. However, this action generates backlash from transhumanist circles, further embroiling the argument that will go on for about a quarter of a century.
  • Global temperatures have risen 3 Celsius since the 20th century. Though fossil fuel emissions have fallen drastically with the rise of affordable green energy in the past 20 years, it will be several decades before the climate begins to reflect this fact. Meanwhile, the Arctic generally only has ice in the wintertime, and in some years not even all of the wintertime. Many once-common polar species are thus facing extinction from the wild. Nevertheless, the world's northernmost countries, including Iceland, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Greenland, Russia, and Canada, are experiencing great economic prosperity. Russia is close to regaining its old superpower status, while Canada's economy and population are booming spectacularly, causing the United States to eye its own northern border nervously.
  • As society follows technology, the line between movies and video games begins to blur in a new medium known as the "virie". This medium has many elements of movies as we know them, but also features less linear and more interactive plot lines. Needless to say, it also takes place in virtual reality, with viewers having the eyes and ears of the characters. Generally they are entirely computer generated, thanks to both improved CGI techniques and faster computational speeds allowing for much quicker rendering. This reduces the need for actors, though there are still obviously script writers, directors, producers, and technical staff involved. Although viries are wildly popular, especially among the teens and young adults in Generation Beta (2025-40), mainstream movies will last another 15 years, and mainstream video games another 25 or so.
  • Floating power stations begin to become prevalent in some areas, such as off the coasts of Europe and East Asia. These stations, which function as floating islands, contain multiple sources of power generation, including solar, wind, and sometimes even fusion. FPS islands are highly expensive to construct--often hundreds of millions of dollars--but are greener than traditional power stations, while freeing up space on land and providing numerous jobs. Distance from land is no concern, as the stations can use wireless electricity technology to beam their energy to multiple coastal substations.
  • Following several fatal accidents involving space junk--the amount of which has been growing exponentially for decades--crashing into private and public space stations, many governments and corporations across the world undertake an intensive effort to clean space junk out of Earth orbit. This is accomplished by various means, such as giant spacecraft orbiting around the Earth, using electromagnets or even huge nets to capture floating space debris. This material is sent down to Earth for recycling, putting the deadly menace to good use.
  • Another remarkable innovation occurs in the form of "smart cities". These cities take a new approach to urban planning, with each building serving as a sort of node, providing power, information, and other resources to the buildings around it. In a way, these are the precursors to arcologies of the late 21st century and beyond. Short-range maglev lines greatly increase the speed and efficiency of intra-city travel, while on the streets, AI-guided traffic control greatly reduces congestion. The clutter of signs and lamp posts has been replaced by Augmented Reality signs and LED lighting or subtle illumination strips that provide light with swarms of invisible nanomachines embedded in the pavement. The buildings in these smart cities heavily feature glass and carbon nanotubes, and are often huge and graceful; most megacities have at least one building soaring to over a mile in height, and the tallest buildings have reached two kilometers in the Middle East and east Asia. [Idea from Will's timeline]
  • By the second half of the century, the American political landscape has changed significantly; some political scientists say that the Seventh Party System has begun. The Republican Party has dropped or moderated many of its socially conservative views, while retaining its fiscal conservatism, becoming akin to the Libertarians of the earlier decades. This is allowing Libertarian views to be significantly represented at the highest levels of government, and many reforms have been made as a result, such as reduced regulation of businesses, the reduction or privatization of many agencies and programs deemed unnecessary or redundant, and a flat 15% tax for all citizens, with many of the loopholes open to the very rich, large corporations, or the very poor being closed. This has allowed businesses and the middle class in general to  prosper immensely. Great strides have also been made in reducing government corruption and disentangling the system from corporate interests. With Generation Z--today's children and teenagers--rising to political power, this decade also sees more political variety, with Centrists and Independents showing up in large numbers in Congress, though a third-party candidate has yet to gain the presidency.
  • Participation in citizen science projects is becoming a very commonplace pastime worldwide, especially among middle-class people, with millions of people spending evenings and weekends collaborating to make new breakthroughs. One of the main causes in this is a greatly increased interest in the sciences. Professional scientists also benefit greatly, as it provides another avenue to help them with their research, along with AI algorithms, the Internet of Things, and advanced knowledge engines.
  • Ecoterrorist networks are beginning to grow in numbers and power across the world, but especially in the United States. This is likely in response to many factors, including major expansion of urban areas, global warming, resource shortages, and the increasing prevalence of extreme weather. These ecoterrorists are very well funded and well organized, and stage many successful attacks on infrastructure and industry, killing thousands and costing countless millions in damage. The vast majority of people condemn these groups, however. [Adapted from Will's timeline]
  • In the superpowers of the world, the majority of their military personnel consist of transhumans/cyborgs or robots. The military has been an early adopter of the most cutting edge augmentation technology, both organic and inorganic, since the late 2030s and early 2040s. Such upgrades significantly boost strength, speed, stamina, and toughness, while research is being done into mental augmentation as well. Less powerful militaries across the world still use unaugmented humans--albeit generally aided by smart armor--and are rapidly finding themselves outclassed by their upgraded opponents. Many smaller nations worldwide begin to fear for their security as a result.

2056 to 2060.

  • By now, with the return of nuclear pulse propulsion, this time as a working concept, travel to the outer Solar System is becoming practical. Thus, the first manned expedition to the Jovian system is launched, following a series of unmanned probes and landers in the 40s and early 50s. Due to the aforementioned advances in propulsion, the journey takes only a matter of months, not the years it would have taken with earlier technology. The ship, which was mostly built with private funding, is remarkable in that it was not only built in Earth orbit--mostly by robots, with a handful of human engineers to oversee construction--but is far larger and more comfortable than any previous interplanetary spaceship. In addition to its crew of astronauts, it carries no fewer than twenty scientists from four continents, all of them in relative comfort. By far the most exciting part of the mission is the landing on one of the major Jovian moons, likely either Ganymede or Europa, paving the way for bases and colonies there in future decades and centuries. This marks the first time in 25 years that humans have set foot on a new world, and the first time in history that people have traveled beyond Mars.
  • Suspended animantion is finally carried out successfully in a clinical trial, with a group of human volunteers being revived after being frozen for several days. Once it is perfected sometime during the next decade or the one after that, this technology will prove to be useful in a variety of fields, including medicine and space travel.
  • Human ectogenesis--the creation of humans via artificial wombs--is achieved for the first time. This comes as the crowning achievement of a long line of feats, beginning with synthesizing single-celled organisms in the 2010s, primitive multi-celled organisms in the 2030s, and higher animals in the 2040s. After an initial round of experimentation, the synthetics (still infants, obviously) are adopted, either by the scientists involved in the project or by suitable families. Though the identities of these children are kept secret, several are outed throughout the 2060s and 2070s, often leading to extremely serious persecution, discrimination, and in some cases even murders or suicides. As a result, synthetic rights become one of the most hot-button social issues throughout the last third of the 21st century.
  • Space telescopes have improved considerably in the past 40 years, to the point that the nearest exoplanets can be directly photographed with some actual detail, just enough to make out features like continents and oceans. The scientific community and the general public look on eagerly as the first blurry photographs of planets like the ones in the Tau Ceti system, are released. Tens or even hundreds of thousands of exoplanets (as well as some extrasolar moons and dwarf planets) have been discovered by now, including many hundreds that are deemed potentially habitable. [Taken from Will's timeline]
  • Large-scale underwater mining is beginning, to compete with the asteroid mining being done in outer space. While underwater mining operations cannot compare with the bounty offered by captured asteroids, the ocean floor is considerably cheaper to access than space, cancelling that fact out somewhat. Between these two new mediums for mining, conventional terrestrial mining is also beginning to wane. Needless to say, like most other hazardous civilian jobs, the actual mining is often remotely controlled from surface ships or dry land, if not automated entirely.
  • Following the great success of the Bering Strait tunnel between the United States and Russia, an intercontinental system of vactrains and modernized superhighways begins construction. This transport network will take about two decades to complete, but when finished, it will stretch across most of North America, Asia, and Europe, linking nearly every megacity in the Northern Hemisphere by road and rail. The benefits, both to citizens and the economy, will be astronomical. The network will only become even more impressive in the future, when it extends to encompass the entire world in the early 22nd century.
  • Further progress in quantum computing technology allows the first quantum supercomputers to be under development. While quantum computers are unbelievably expensive, more so than traditional supercomputers, they are also considerably faster and more powerful. In terms of their commonness and impact, quantum computers in the 21st century are in general following a similar pattern to that of traditional computers in the 20th century (first practical units in the 40s and 50s, personal models in the 70s, and adoption by the masses in the 80s and 90s).
  • Hundreds of people are now on the Moon and Mars at any given time, most of them put there by private space programs; the situation on both worlds is similar to what Antarctica is today. However, for practical purposes, scientists and astronauts often remain at Lunar and Martian bases for years at a time. Because of this, and because people tend to be people, the first non-Earthborn children are being born in this time period. This is not exactly uncontroversial among many, though it does provide interesting opportunities to study the effects of space on human physiology. Meanwhile, suborbital and low-orbit space tourism are beginning to be available to the upper middle class and modestly rich (as opposed to super-rich). However, as this costs many thousands of dollars, it's typically treated as an extremely rare opportunity.
  • A new AI technique known as predictive algorithms is launched by the US government, with several other nations deploying similar technologies around this time. As the name suggests, predictive algorithms use vast amounts of big data (gathered from security drones, webnets browsing histories, and other resources) and advanced pattern recognition to identify criminals and criminal activities before they occur. The algorithms are initially mainly used for counter-terrorism purposes, where they prove highly successful. As one might imagine, civil liberties groups complain loudly about this. However, by the end of the decade, predictive algorithms have been used to predict and avert several major terror attacks on the scale of 9/11, if not greater, which changes public opinion considerably, though predictive algorithms will not have universal support for decades.
  • An anti-immigrant sentiment is developing in parts of the United States and Europe. Both areas are seeing many climate change refugees pouring in from the south in ever-greater numbers, often illegally. This is considerably taxing the resources of both countries, and also means that an increasing number of people are competing for ever-fewer jobs, thus leading to an increasing sense of resentment for these newcomers.
  • In developed countries, and especially in the East, most new buildings are now 3D printed. Most of these buildings are essentially a series of building elements that are fitted together on-site by remote-controlled drones and robots. This allows for buildings to be constructed far quicker and more cheaply; a skyscraper in the late 2050s takes a matter of weeks to construct, instead of months or years like in earlier decades.


#14
Eyalin

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Great stuff as always, Jacob. I just find it hard to project beyond 2030 though, since what happens tomorrow depends on what happens today. I am thinking of coming up with a hard East African timeline up to 2030 (or 2050 if I don't have enough to write about). I'm currently reading up on the future of Africa to come up with something believable.


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#15
TranscendingGod

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I want to go visit africa.

The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#16
Infinite

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I want to go visit africa.

Then go visit Africa. There is nothing stopping you from immersing yourself in the entire world except the malicious voice of negativity at the back of your head. Make a plan, save up money, and just go. Once you conquer that doubt, nothing will stand in your way.
.

#17
TranscendingGod

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I want to go visit africa.

Then go visit Africa. There is nothing stopping you from immersing yourself in the entire world except the malicious voice of negativity at the back of your head. Make a plan, save up money, and just go. Once you conquer that doubt, nothing will stand in your way.

Umm.. my net monthly income is 0-10 dollars. Not gonna happen for a while.

The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#18
Raklian

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Umm.. my net monthly income is 0-10 dollars. Not gonna happen for a while.

 

 

You might want to push your luck at gambling this discretionary income. :)

 

You have nothing to lose with this amount, right?


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#19
TranscendingGod

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Umm.. my net monthly income is 0-10 dollars. Not gonna happen for a while.

 

 

You might want to push your luck at gambling this discretionary income. :)

 

You have nothing to lose with this amount, right?

 

Yeah but sometimes i buy chips and a soda and i go broke.


The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#20
Raklian

Raklian

    An Immortal In The Making

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Yeah but sometimes i buy chips and a soda and i go broke.


 

 

 

A lot of people think it's cute but for those who experience this predicament directly it is by no means pleasant at all.


What are you without the sum of your parts?





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