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3D Printing News and Discussions


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#341
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GE reveals 3D Printer for one meter metal objects and system will scale to larger sizes
brian wang | November 15, 2017 |
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GE revealed the beta version of the world’s largest 3D printer for metals, which uses a laser and a powder bed to make parts. It is capable of printing parts as large as 1 meter in diameter directly from a computer file by fusing together thin layers of metal powder with a 1-kilowatt laser. The machine has the potential to build even bigger parts, due to the nature of the scalable technology. Customers are already requesting machines with build volumes of more than 1 meter cubed.

GE used the beta machine to print a jet engine combustor liner.

GE uses proprietary technology to control powder dosing, reducing powder consumption by 69 percent compared to traditional machines “on its first attempt.” The machine will also print faster than today’s machines. GE can configure the design and allows customers to add more lasers.

 

https://www.nextbigf...rger-sizes.html


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#342
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New method 3D-prints fully functional electronic circuits
November 10, 2017
(Left) Conductive and polymeric inks were simultaneously inkjet-printed and solidified in a single process using UV irradiation. (Right) Microcontroller, batteries, and motors were then manually embedded in the system, creating a functioning miniature car. (credit: Ehab Saleh et al./University of Nottingham)

 

Researchers at the University of Nottingham have developed a method for rapidly 3D-printing fully functional electronic circuits such as antennas, medical devices, and solar-energy-collecting structures.

Unlike conventional 3D printers, these circuits can contain both both electrically conductive metallic inks (like the silver wires in the photo above) and insulating polymeric inks (like the yellow and orange support structure). A UV light is used rapidly solidify the inks).

The “multifunctional additive manufacturing” (MFAM) method combines 3D printing, which is based on layer-by-layer deposition of materials to create 3D devices, with 2D-printed electronics. It prints both conductors and insulators in a single step, expanding the range of functions in electronics (but not integrated circuits and other complex devices).

 

http://www.kurzweila...tronic-circuits
 



#343
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New 3-D printer is ten times faster than commercial counterparts
November 28, 2017

MIT engineers have developed a new desktop 3-D printer that performs up to 10 times faster than existing commercial counterparts. Whereas the most common printers may fabricate a few Lego-sized bricks in one hour, the new design can print similarly sized objects in just a few minutes.

 

https://phys.org/new...commercial.html


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#344
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New research identifies how 3-D printed metals can be both strong and ductile
December 11, 2017

A new technique by which to 3D print metals, involving a widely used stainless steel, has been show to achieve exception levels of both strength and ductility, when compared to counterparts from more conventional processes.

The findings, published in Materials Today, outline how a joint research team from the University of Birmingham, UK, Stockholm University, Sweden and Zhejiang University, China were able to optimizing the process parameters during 3D printing to achieve the results.

The research is contrary to the sceptcism around the ability to make strong and ductile metals through 3D printing, and as such the discovery is crucial to moving the technology forward for the manufacturing of heavy duty parts.

 

https://techxplore.c...ng-ductile.html



#345
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3D-printed bus shelter goes into service
 

3D printing has been slowly finding a foothold in architecture over the last few years, with an office going up in Dubai, a tiny house printed in Russia and a cheap shelter layered from clay and straw by WASP's Big Delta printer. Now WinSun Construction has revealed the world's first 3D-printed bus shelter.

The rather stark-looking WinSun shelter has been printed using recycled waste materials at the company's Shanghai facility within one night and subsequently shipped and installed at a country lane in Fengjing Ancient Town, Jinshan, China, that previously only had a stop sign.

 

https://newatlas.com...-shelter/52782/



#346
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3D Printed Hexagonal Pods Could House New York City's Homeless

Across the world, homelessness in fast-paced metropolises such as New York City is at a record high since the Great Depression of the 1930s, more than 60,000 people are in shelters every night while many others must find a place to sleep on the streets, the subway or other public spaces. The real estate industry has caused the increasing rents and a high demand for any remaining plots; many of the new builds are luxury apartments, rather than the low-cost housing that is so desperately needed. As a result, thousands of people are forced onto the streets and charities struggle to provide adequate help for everyone.


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#347
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Lawrence Livermore unlocks 3D printing to smaller than 150 nanometer features

 

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have discovered novel ways to extend the capabilities of two-photon lithography (TPL), a high-resolution 3D printing technique capable of producing nanoscale features smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair.

The findings unleashes the potential for X-ray computed tomography (CT) to analyze stress or defects noninvasively in embedded 3D-printed medical devices or implants.

That's certainly revolutionary (could be used in creating microbots?) but I'm not sure it would scale without much difficulty.



#348
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This is one of the reasons I fight for these labs so hard. Can you imagine how much less advance we'd be today if these didn't exist?

 

So many awesome advancement! From energy to three D printing.



#349
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Novel 3-D printing technique yields high-performance composites
January 15, 2018, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

https://techxplore.c...composites.html

Rotational 3-D printing precisely choreographs the speed and rotation of a 3-D printer nozzle to program the arrangement of embedded fibers in polymer matrices. This is achieved by equipping a rotational printhead system with a stepper motor to guide the angular velocity of the rotating nozzle as the ink is extruded. Credit: Brett Compton/SEAS

Nature has produced exquisite composite materials—wood, bone, teeth, and shells, for example—that combine light weight and density with desirable mechanical properties such as stiffness, strength and damage tolerance.

Since ancient civilizations first combined straw and mud to form bricks, people have fabricated engineered composites of increasing performance and complexity. But reproducing the exceptional mechanical properties and complex microstructures found in nature has been challenging.

 



#350
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A Real World 'Star Trek' Replicator Is Now Possible Thanks To New Breakthrough

A startup with alumni from MIT and Yale says it's made a breakthrough in creating a next-generation material that should make it possible to 3-d print literally anything out of thin air.
New York-based Mattershift has managed to create large-scale carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes that are able to combine and separate individual molecules.
"This technology gives us a level of control over the material world that we've never had before," said Mattershift Founder and CEO Dr. Rob McGinnis in a release. "For example, right now we're working to remove CO2 from the air and turn it into fuels. This has already been done using conventional technology, but it's been too expensive to be practical. Using our tech, I think we'll be able to produce carbon-zero gasoline, diesel, and jet fuels that are cheaper than fossil fuels."



From 3D printing to full-fledged fabrication.


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#351
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The Quest to Bring 3-D Printed Homes to the Developing World

IN THE LOW-SLUNG hills of El Salvador, building a house is not an easy task. The land is vulnerable to earthquakes, flooding, volcanic eruptions. The roads are rugged, electricity sparse. For the past several years, New Story—a housing charity based in San Francisco—has built over 150 homes there, replacing tarps and scrap metal shelters with houses that have proper roofs and floors. It's slow, painstaking work in a country where nearly a third of the population is without shelter.
About a year ago, the company wondered if there was a better way to build. In the three years since it launched, New Story had gathered the funding to construct 1,300 homes and had completed 850 of them—but that felt like a drop in a bucket. "There are over 100 million people living in slum conditions in what we call survival mode," says Alexandria Lafci, New Story's co-founder and COO. "How can we make a big dent in this instead of just solving incrementally?"
The idea they landed on: 3-D printing.


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#352
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This $10,000 3D printed house can be built in 24 hours and is bigger than a studio apartment

One of the less obvious products being unveiled this week at SXSW is a small concrete house. On the outside, it doesn’t look like anything particularly special, although the covered patio and spacious windows are less common on tiny poured-concrete buildings.
That’s because the innovation isn’t in the structure or materials — it’s in the design and building. ICON, the company that builds the 650-square-foot house, claims it costs just $10,000 to build, and can be 3-D printed by a Vulcan printer in 12 to 24 hours using the most common building material on Earth.


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#353
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Researchers use 3-D printing to create metallic glass alloys in bulk
March 22, 2018 by Matt Shipman, North Carolina State University

 

Researchers have now demonstrated the ability to create amorphous metal, or metallic glass, alloys using three-dimensional (3-D) printing technology, opening the door to a variety of applications – such as more efficient electric motors, better wear-resistant materials, higher strength materials, and lighter weight structures.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...s-bulk.html#jCp



#354
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The LSEV: 3-D printing for automobiles on a bolder scale
March 24, 2018 by Nancy Owano, Tech Xplore

 

Are you ready for a future car-buying option of picking out a 3-D printed, cozy, inexpensive automobile? The day is not far, considering the recent announcement by an Italy-based company along with a company based in China.

The Italy-based electric car company X Electrical Vehicle (XEV) and 3-D printing material company Polymaker organized a joint press conference at the China 3-D-Printing Cultural Museum earlier this month in Shanghai. The announcement: The first mass-producible 3-D-printed electric car.

This car, named LSEV, created by XEV, made news for car parts that were 3-D-printed with materials from Polymaker.

 

https://techxplore.c...lder-scale.html



#355
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Scientists print all-liquid 3-D structures
March 27, 2018 by Dan Krotz, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
 

Scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a way to print 3-D structures composed entirely of liquids. Using a modified 3-D printer, they injected threads of water into silicone oil—sculpting tubes made of one liquid within another liquid.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...quid-d.html#jCp



#356
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3-DIY: Printing your own bioprinter
March 27, 2018 by E. Forney , Emily Durham, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a low-cost 3-D bioprinter by modifying a standard desktop 3-D printer, and they have released the breakthrough designs as open source so that anyone can build their own system. The researchers—Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and Biomedical Engineering (BME) Associate Professor Adam Feinberg, BME postdoctoral fellow TJ Hinton, and Kira Pusch, a recent graduate of the MSE undergraduate program—recently published a paper in the journal HardwareX that contains complete instructions for printing and installing the syringe-based, large volume extruder (LVE) to modify any typical, commercial plastic printer.

 

https://techxplore.c...bioprinter.html



#357
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Software automatically generates knitting instructions for 3-D shapes
March 29, 2018, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists have developed a system that can translate a wide variety of 3-D shapes into stitch-by-stitch instructions that enable a computer-controlled knitting machine to automatically produce those shapes.

Researchers in the Carnegie Mellon Textiles Lab have used the system to produce a variety of plush toys and garments. What's more, James McCann, assistant professor in the Robotics Institute and leader of the lab, said this ability to generate knitting instructions without need of human expertise could make on-demand machine knitting possible.

McCann's vision is to use the same machines that routinely crank out thousands of knitted hats, gloves and other apparel to produce customized pieces one at a time or in small quantities. Gloves, for instance, might be designed to precisely fit a customer's hands. Athletic shoe uppers, sweaters and hats might have unique color patterns or ornamentation.

 

https://techxplore.c...atically-d.html


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#358
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Work underway on EU's first 3D-printed concrete house

 

3D-printed architecture seems to have taken another step towards the mainstream, with the news that engineering firm Arup and CLS Architetti are collaborating on the first 3D-printed concrete house in the European Union. Named 3D Housing 05, the project was conceived to demonstrate the efficacy of the cutting-edge technology.

 

https://newatlas.com...chitetti/54024/



#359
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Scientists successfully print glass optics
March 30, 2018 by Jeremy Thomas, Lawrence Livermore National LaboratoryL
 

For the first time, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have successfully 3-D-printed optical-quality glasses, on par with commercial glass products currently available on the market.

In a study published in the journal Advanced Materials Technologies, LLNL scientists and engineers describe successfully printing small test pieces from Lab-developed ink with properties "within range of commercial optical grade glasses."

Because the refractive index of glass is sensitive to its thermal history, it can be difficult to ensure that glass printed from the molten phase will result in the desired optical performance, researchers said. Depositing the LLNL-developed material in paste form and then heating the entire print to form the glass allows for a uniform refractive index, eliminating optical distortion that would degrade the optic's function.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...optics.html#jCp


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#360
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3D printed bridge looks like alien technology
brian wang | April 4, 2018
https://www.nextbigf...technology.html
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MX3D is 3D printing a fully functional stainless steel bridge to cross one of the oldest and most famous canals in the center of Amsterdam, the Oudezijds Achterburgwal. They equip typical industrial robots with purpose-built tools and develop the software to control them. The unique approach allows us to 3D print strong, complex and graceful structures out of metal. The goal of the MX3D Bridge project is to showcase the potential applications of our multi-axis 3D printing technology.

 






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