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3D Printing News and Discussions


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#341
Sciencerocks

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GE reveals 3D Printer for one meter metal objects and system will scale to larger sizes
brian wang | November 15, 2017 |
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GE revealed the beta version of the world’s largest 3D printer for metals, which uses a laser and a powder bed to make parts. It is capable of printing parts as large as 1 meter in diameter directly from a computer file by fusing together thin layers of metal powder with a 1-kilowatt laser. The machine has the potential to build even bigger parts, due to the nature of the scalable technology. Customers are already requesting machines with build volumes of more than 1 meter cubed.

GE used the beta machine to print a jet engine combustor liner.

GE uses proprietary technology to control powder dosing, reducing powder consumption by 69 percent compared to traditional machines “on its first attempt.” The machine will also print faster than today’s machines. GE can configure the design and allows customers to add more lasers.

 

https://www.nextbigf...rger-sizes.html


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#342
Sciencerocks

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New method 3D-prints fully functional electronic circuits
November 10, 2017
(Left) Conductive and polymeric inks were simultaneously inkjet-printed and solidified in a single process using UV irradiation. (Right) Microcontroller, batteries, and motors were then manually embedded in the system, creating a functioning miniature car. (credit: Ehab Saleh et al./University of Nottingham)

 

Researchers at the University of Nottingham have developed a method for rapidly 3D-printing fully functional electronic circuits such as antennas, medical devices, and solar-energy-collecting structures.

Unlike conventional 3D printers, these circuits can contain both both electrically conductive metallic inks (like the silver wires in the photo above) and insulating polymeric inks (like the yellow and orange support structure). A UV light is used rapidly solidify the inks).

The “multifunctional additive manufacturing” (MFAM) method combines 3D printing, which is based on layer-by-layer deposition of materials to create 3D devices, with 2D-printed electronics. It prints both conductors and insulators in a single step, expanding the range of functions in electronics (but not integrated circuits and other complex devices).

 

http://www.kurzweila...tronic-circuits
 



#343
Sciencerocks

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New 3-D printer is ten times faster than commercial counterparts
November 28, 2017

MIT engineers have developed a new desktop 3-D printer that performs up to 10 times faster than existing commercial counterparts. Whereas the most common printers may fabricate a few Lego-sized bricks in one hour, the new design can print similarly sized objects in just a few minutes.

 

https://phys.org/new...commercial.html


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#344
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New research identifies how 3-D printed metals can be both strong and ductile
December 11, 2017

A new technique by which to 3D print metals, involving a widely used stainless steel, has been show to achieve exception levels of both strength and ductility, when compared to counterparts from more conventional processes.

The findings, published in Materials Today, outline how a joint research team from the University of Birmingham, UK, Stockholm University, Sweden and Zhejiang University, China were able to optimizing the process parameters during 3D printing to achieve the results.

The research is contrary to the sceptcism around the ability to make strong and ductile metals through 3D printing, and as such the discovery is crucial to moving the technology forward for the manufacturing of heavy duty parts.

 

https://techxplore.c...ng-ductile.html



#345
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3D-printed bus shelter goes into service
 

3D printing has been slowly finding a foothold in architecture over the last few years, with an office going up in Dubai, a tiny house printed in Russia and a cheap shelter layered from clay and straw by WASP's Big Delta printer. Now WinSun Construction has revealed the world's first 3D-printed bus shelter.

The rather stark-looking WinSun shelter has been printed using recycled waste materials at the company's Shanghai facility within one night and subsequently shipped and installed at a country lane in Fengjing Ancient Town, Jinshan, China, that previously only had a stop sign.

 

https://newatlas.com...-shelter/52782/



#346
Yuli Ban

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3D Printed Hexagonal Pods Could House New York City's Homeless

Across the world, homelessness in fast-paced metropolises such as New York City is at a record high since the Great Depression of the 1930s, more than 60,000 people are in shelters every night while many others must find a place to sleep on the streets, the subway or other public spaces. The real estate industry has caused the increasing rents and a high demand for any remaining plots; many of the new builds are luxury apartments, rather than the low-cost housing that is so desperately needed. As a result, thousands of people are forced onto the streets and charities struggle to provide adequate help for everyone.


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#347
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Lawrence Livermore unlocks 3D printing to smaller than 150 nanometer features

 

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have discovered novel ways to extend the capabilities of two-photon lithography (TPL), a high-resolution 3D printing technique capable of producing nanoscale features smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair.

The findings unleashes the potential for X-ray computed tomography (CT) to analyze stress or defects noninvasively in embedded 3D-printed medical devices or implants.

That's certainly revolutionary (could be used in creating microbots?) but I'm not sure it would scale without much difficulty.


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#348
Sciencerocks

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This is one of the reasons I fight for these labs so hard. Can you imagine how much less advance we'd be today if these didn't exist?

 

So many awesome advancement! From energy to three D printing.



#349
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Novel 3-D printing technique yields high-performance composites
January 15, 2018, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

https://techxplore.c...composites.html

Rotational 3-D printing precisely choreographs the speed and rotation of a 3-D printer nozzle to program the arrangement of embedded fibers in polymer matrices. This is achieved by equipping a rotational printhead system with a stepper motor to guide the angular velocity of the rotating nozzle as the ink is extruded. Credit: Brett Compton/SEAS

Nature has produced exquisite composite materials—wood, bone, teeth, and shells, for example—that combine light weight and density with desirable mechanical properties such as stiffness, strength and damage tolerance.

Since ancient civilizations first combined straw and mud to form bricks, people have fabricated engineered composites of increasing performance and complexity. But reproducing the exceptional mechanical properties and complex microstructures found in nature has been challenging.

 






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