Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

These ads will disappear if you register on the forum

Photo

"Scientists find a new material that turns bullets into dust"

armor materials science military

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1
Jakob

Jakob

    Fenny-Eyed Slubber-Yuck

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,222 posts
  • LocationIn the Basket of Deplorables

I found this last month, so it's slightly old news, but still news. The material in question is composite metal foams, which in addition to being so strong that they literally destroy armor-piercing bullets, are also superior in thermal resistance and presumably weight (by virtue of not being entirely solid). Here's the link and a blurb:

 

Composite Metal Foams (CMFs)

 

The new material was developed by researchers at North Carolina State University, finding that the CMFs had an excellent thermal protection, when being compared to regular metal and it managed to turn armor piercing bullets into dust when in touch with the material.

 

The team studied the lightweight of the CMFs and found that it possessed air pockets inside the metal foams. These air pockets are able to block the heat of the upcoming impact.

 

The CMF’s are made from what researchers call “composite metal foam” that acts as an armor able to destroy bullets created to pierce what is set upfront.

 

Do you think this might see widespread use in body armor in the 2020s and beyond, possibly in addition to nanotech materials like nanotubes and graphene? Perhaps it could be incorporated into my hypothetical smart armor, or the Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit.


Click 'show' to see quotes from great luminaries.

Spoiler

#2
Zeitgeist123

Zeitgeist123

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,801 posts

how about materials that turns nuclear bombs falling from the sky into non-radioactive dust? that would be a great anti-nuclear defense concept. then we wouldnt have to worry about WWIII and the eventual end of the world. (except climate change and antibiotic resistance of course)


“Philosophy is a pretty toy if one indulges in it with moderation at the right time of life. But if one pursues it further than one should, it is absolute ruin." - Callicles to Socrates


#3
Jakob

Jakob

    Fenny-Eyed Slubber-Yuck

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,222 posts
  • LocationIn the Basket of Deplorables

how about materials that turns nuclear bombs falling from the sky into non-radioactive dust? that would be a great anti-nuclear defense concept.

That makes sense for bullets, which are dumb projectiles that do they damage simply by hitting hard. Nukes, on the other hand, don't need to be physically shattered to stop them from going off (I'm not sure if that's either necessary or sufficient to stop a nuke.) Anyway, lasers are probably the way to go for anti-nuke (and anti-missile) weapons.

 

 

then we wouldnt have to worry about WWIII and the eventual end of the world. (except climate change and antibiotic resistance of course)

I doubt that WW3 would be the apocalyptic doomsday depicted in fiction. For one thing, our diplomacy systems have improved considerably since the last one, and for another thing, mutual assured destruction makes a nuclear attack very unlikely. If it did, it would almost certainly be a limited exchange, not a total one, since most people don't want to destroy the world.

 

And none of this precludes a WW3 fought with non-nuclear devices, or with cleaner nuke-like entities (e.g. rods from god, pure fusion bombs, antimatter bombs, etc.).


Click 'show' to see quotes from great luminaries.

Spoiler

#4
Whereas

Whereas

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 469 posts

You've left out the best part: the foam blocks X-rays, gamma rays and neutron radiation. I wonder if it would make for better spacecraft armor than lead? I mean the biggest obstacle to long-range manned space travel is that our current tech can't block space radiation without taking up too much space or weighing too much.


  • Jakob likes this

If you're wrong, how would you know it?


#5
Jakob

Jakob

    Fenny-Eyed Slubber-Yuck

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,222 posts
  • LocationIn the Basket of Deplorables

You've left out the best part: the foam blocks X-rays, gamma rays and neutron radiation. I wonder if it would make for better spacecraft armor than lead?

Oooh, sweet. I didn't even notice that bit!

 

 

I mean the biggest obstacle to long-range manned space travel is that our current tech can't block space radiation without taking up too much space or weighing too much.

Well, that and the fact that long-ranged manned space travel takes months or years with current propulsion systems.


Click 'show' to see quotes from great luminaries.

Spoiler

#6
kjaggard

kjaggard

    Artificer

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,825 posts
  • Locationwhere fanciful imaginings and hard won knowledge meet to genesis the future.

it's a bit over hyped by articles like that, but it is a useful material. It's still a sacrificial armor. Like many types of ballistic plates it's good for a couple of hits before it's no good anymore. It protects the person by becoming damaged itself. You have to swap in replacements regularly.

 

Good news that they don't mention is that since it's essentially hollow spheres suspended in another metal the material gets it's properties from it's structure, and thus given a 3d printer that can print in steel and aluminum on small scales you could 3d print this material.


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: armor, materials science, military

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users