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Post-Brexit UK News and Discussions


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#21
Time_Traveller

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City firms may lose 'prized' EU access, say eurozone leaders

25 June 2016

 

London's financial firms risk losing unrestricted access to the European Union, according to eurozone leaders.

The head of the Eurogroup of finance ministers, Jeroen Dijsselbloem, said banks could move jobs outside the UK if it leaves the single market.

It comes as EU financial services chief Lord Hill announced his resignation.

However, UK economist Gerard Lyons said that despite the EU's "unsurprising" warnings, London would not be displaced as Europe's dominant financial centre.

Many of London's big financial institutions, which employ tens of thousands of UK staff, trade unhindered across the EU under rights known as "passporting".

However, that would be under threat if the UK chooses to leave the single market as part of its withdrawal.

Mr Dijsselbloem, the Dutch finance minister, said limited access to the EU single market would be the "price" of the UK leaving the EU.

The head of France's central bank also warned that London's banks would lose their "financial passport".

"It would be a bit paradoxical to leave the EU and apply all EU rules, but that is one solution if Britain wants to keep access to the single market," said Francois Villeroy de Galhau, who is also a member of the European Central Bank's governing body.

Following the Leave vote, London's banks have begun to look at shifting some operations outside of the UK. Several European cities have long-wanted to attract business away from London.

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-36628595


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#22
Maximus

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Stupid, first of all the Prime Minister is always "unelected" people vote for the MPs and the MPs choose the leader.

 

Second if immigration is a fear of people coming, than I don't see why you think people would be bothered by not being able to leave the country without a passport. Not even the same issue. 

 

I would not be in any rush to assume companies are going to go to France in particular, or even Germany which already has a huge labor shortage. Ireland might be a better case.

 

I could go on...

 

The only legit points there are the NHS, EEA, Pension, and seperation ones...

 

 

And those "legitimate points" somehow don't count? Also, those big businesses will leave the UK if its access to the European market changes. 


If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#23
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UK's most senior EU official resigns

 

 

Britain’s most senior EU official, Jonathan Hill, is resigning.

Lord Hill, who was sent to Brussels by David Cameron and took the highly-prized portfolio of financial services, said he didn’t believe it was right for him to carry on in the post. He was standing down in line with what he had discussed with the president of the European Commission some weeks ago, he added.

 

Angela Merkel tells EU there is ‘no need to be nasty’ to Britain

 

Angela Merkel has insisted there is "no need to be nasty" to Britain over its "divorce" terms from the EU.

 
The intervention from the German chancellor came despite the EU putting Mr Cameron under intense pressure to immediately begin Brexit talks.
 
Mr Cameron said he would leave it to a successor chosen in October to trigger the two-year process of negotiations envisaged by EU treaties when he announced his resignation in the wake of the humiliating referendum defeat.
 
But the Prime Minister's slow-motion exit plan has drawn considerable fire on the Continent.
 
Mrs Merkel said it "shouldn't take forever" for Britain to deliver formal notification of its intention to leave under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty.

 

Compare this with Juncker and Steinmeier's statements lol.

 

 

Nigel Farage has reacted with fury after Vote Leave said it would exclude him from a cross-party committee which will negotiate Britain’s exit from the European Union.

 
The UK Independence Party leader said that he would use his position as head of the Ukip group in the European Parliament – the biggest group  of British MEPs – to ensure he had a say over the terms of British breakaway from the EU.
 
Senior Vote Leave sources on Friday made clear that Mr Farage would not be invited to join the committee negotiating the Brexit.

 Ha, looks like you can barrage the Farage.


If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#24
Humey

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Londoner's are signing a petition to become independent. 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...rendum-36620401

 

Wouldn't that make Birmingham the capital of the UK if that happened.

 

Manchester might disagree.

 

 

But Birmingham is the second city of England.

 

It's contentious.

 

 

http://news.bbc.co.u...and/6349501.stm

A 2007 survey conducted by GfK commissioned by the BBC in December 2006 investigating the subject of the "'Second city' of England" (as opposed to the UK as a whole), 48% of 1,000 people placed Manchester, with 40% choosing Birmingham.

 

https://yougov.co.uk...second-capital/

A 2015 survey by YouGov showed that 30% thought Manchester was the second city, 20% thought Birmingham and 12% thought Edinburgh



#25
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liam%20brexit_zpslgyxwjxp.jpg

 

UK, you know you fucked up when even this guy thinks you're crazy.  :rofl:


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If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#26
MarcZ

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Stupid, first of all the Prime Minister is always "unelected" people vote for the MPs and the MPs choose the leader.

 

Second if immigration is a fear of people coming, than I don't see why you think people would be bothered by not being able to leave the country without a passport. Not even the same issue. 

 

I would not be in any rush to assume companies are going to go to France in particular, or even Germany which already has a huge labor shortage. Ireland might be a better case.

 

I could go on...

 

The only legit points there are the NHS, EEA, Pension, and seperation ones...

 

 

And those "legitimate points" somehow don't count? Also, those big businesses will leave the UK if its access to the European market changes. 

 

 

I didn't say they don't count. I just found most of the post to be extremely juvenile. Then again most FB political postings are...



#27
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HSBC 'to move jobs to Paris if UK leaves single market'

25 June 2016

 

HSBC would move up to 1,000 staff from London to Paris if the UK left the single market, following Britain's vote to leave the EU, the BBC understands.

The staff who would be relocated would be those who already process payments made in euros for HSBC in Canary Wharf.

Thursday's referendum result means the UK will need to renegotiate its trade relationship with the European Union - including whether it remains part of the single market.

HSBC has declined to comment.

If the UK was not in the single market or the European Economic Area (EEA), it would mean the loss of "passporting", which allows banks to operate without restriction in all EEA countries.

The EEA comprises the 28 members of the EU, plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. EEA rules allow those non-EU countries to be part of the EU's single market, as long as they allow full freedom of movement of people.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-36629745


I want to go ahead of Father Time with a scythe of my own.

H. G. Wells

#28
Sciencerocks

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Great news! Scotland should and must be allowed to do what the people of Scotland wish it to do.


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#29
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HSBC 'to move jobs to Paris if UK leaves single market'

25 June 2016

 

HSBC would move up to 1,000 staff from London to Paris if the UK left the single market, following Britain's vote to leave the EU, the BBC understands.

The staff who would be relocated would be those who already process payments made in euros for HSBC in Canary Wharf.

Thursday's referendum result means the UK will need to renegotiate its trade relationship with the European Union - including whether it remains part of the single market.

HSBC has declined to comment.

If the UK was not in the single market or the European Economic Area (EEA), it would mean the loss of "passporting", which allows banks to operate without restriction in all EEA countries.

The EEA comprises the 28 members of the EU, plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. EEA rules allow those non-EU countries to be part of the EU's single market, as long as they allow full freedom of movement of people.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-36629745

 

 

There goes another Leave promise. There will be no change to immigration to the UK, unless the Leave camp wants to risk losing all the major businesses. So much for "regaining control". All the UK is gonna get is an even worse deal than they have now.


If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#30
Sciencerocks

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HSBC 'to move jobs to Paris if UK leaves single market'

25 June 2016

 

HSBC would move up to 1,000 staff from London to Paris if the UK left the single market, following Britain's vote to leave the EU, the BBC understands.

The staff who would be relocated would be those who already process payments made in euros for HSBC in Canary Wharf.

Thursday's referendum result means the UK will need to renegotiate its trade relationship with the European Union - including whether it remains part of the single market.

HSBC has declined to comment.

If the UK was not in the single market or the European Economic Area (EEA), it would mean the loss of "passporting", which allows banks to operate without restriction in all EEA countries.

The EEA comprises the 28 members of the EU, plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. EEA rules allow those non-EU countries to be part of the EU's single market, as long as they allow full freedom of movement of people.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-36629745

 

 

There goes another Leave promise. There will be no change to immigration to the UK, unless the Leave camp wants to risk losing all the major businesses. So much for "regaining control". All the UK is gonna get is an even worse deal than they have now.

 

 

For all the racist that voted for leave, well, they're in for a massive surprise! The common wealth is far more non-white then the EU states by alot. The immigration will be more from Pakistan, India, Africa, etc. The whole leave campaign was based on nothing more then lies.


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#31
Infinite

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A+ plan for 'The Celtic Isles'! xD xD

https://m.facebook.c...04&id=662709403

Is minic an fhírinne searbh.


#32
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George Soros has warned that Britain's vote to leave the European Union makes the disintegration of the bloc "practically irreversible".

 

"Now the catastrophic scenario that many feared has materialised, making the disintegration of the EU practically irreversible," wrote Mr Soros in his latest article.

"The financial markets worldwide are likely to remain in turmoil as the long, complicated process of political and economic divorce from the EU is negotiated."
 
He said the consequences for the economy would be comparable to the financial crisis of 2007-2008.
"After Brexit, all of us who believe in the values and principles that the EU was designed to uphold must band together to save it by thoroughly reconstructing it," he wrote.
"I am convinced that as the consequences of Brexit unfold in the weeks and months ahead, more and more people will join us."

Might have to update the timeline, Will. Looks like the EU will disintegrate in the 2020's.


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If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#33
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U.K. is making signals that the very first economic thing a new "Brexit government" is going to do is going to be to prepare a trade deal with Canada. The UK High Commissioner was speaking to Canadian radio today.

 

As such the U.K. is going to need to hire a bunch of new trade professionals for the negotiations as previously all this was outsourced to the E.U., this might be a good thing as the Canadian - Europe Trade Agreement got totally bogged down and looks like it will go nowhere. This again shows a problem with Europe where countries may want trade deals with others but if even one member does not agree they cannot sign trade deals on their own. 

 

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...rexit-1.3652048



#34
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George Soros has warned that Britain's vote to leave the European Union makes the disintegration of the bloc "practically irreversible".

 

"Now the catastrophic scenario that many feared has materialised, making the disintegration of the EU practically irreversible," wrote Mr Soros in his latest article.

"The financial markets worldwide are likely to remain in turmoil as the long, complicated process of political and economic divorce from the EU is negotiated."
 
He said the consequences for the economy would be comparable to the financial crisis of 2007-2008.
"After Brexit, all of us who believe in the values and principles that the EU was designed to uphold must band together to save it by thoroughly reconstructing it," he wrote.
"I am convinced that as the consequences of Brexit unfold in the weeks and months ahead, more and more people will join us."

Might have to update the timeline, Will. Looks like the EU will disintegrate in the 2020's.

 

This isn't good for stability of europe and even worse for science. The future might be more violent and less stable then envisioned in wills timeline.


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#35
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Might have to update the timeline, Will. Looks like the EU will disintegrate in the 2020's.

This isn't good for stability of europe and even worse for science. The future might be more violent and less stable then envisioned in wills timeline.

 

Sure looks like that's where the world (especially the West) is headed. Europe will break up into far right, isolationist regimes, the US will follow the same trend, and power and prosperity will overwhelmingly shift to the East. At least China will carry on the legacy. 


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If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#36
MarcZ

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Might have to update the timeline, Will. Looks like the EU will disintegrate in the 2020's.

This isn't good for stability of europe and even worse for science. The future might be more violent and less stable then envisioned in wills timeline.

 

Sure looks like that's where the world (especially the West) is headed. Europe will break up into far right, isolationist regimes, the US will follow the same trend, and power and prosperity will overwhelmingly shift to the East. At least China will carry on the legacy. 

 

 

This is being over-dramatic... 



#37
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UK science wakes up to new future

 

Britain's science sector has done increasingly well out of the EU in recent years, receiving €8.8bn in research funding in 2007-2013 versus the €5.4bn it paid in over the same period. And UK-based scientists have won about a fifth of all the grants, in terms of value, from the top-tier programmes run by the European Research Council.

This funding flow-back has been described as being akin to having another Research Council to go with the seven national bodies that presently distribute UK government monies.
 
To maintain access to the EU stream, Britain will likely now have to get itself some kind of "associated country" status, similar to the positions held by other non-EU countries such as Norway, Switzerland and Israel.
Associated countries pay a GDP membership fee to "join the club", after which, in principle, their scientists can bid for support in the same way as those from full EU member states.
 
But the exact arrangements will need to be worked out, and are going to depend on wider economic and political factors.
Switzerland, for example, only has "partial" associated status currently because it is not allowing Croatian citizens free access to its labour market.
And having free movement to work collaboratively is central to the way modern science is done.

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If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#38
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Sure looks like that's where the world (especially the West) is headed. Europe will break up into far right, isolationist regimes, the US will follow the same trend, and power and prosperity will overwhelmingly shift to the East. At least China will carry on the legacy. 

 

This is being over-dramatic... 

Over-dramatic? Power is shifting East to China, regardless of the EU breaking up or not. However, a fractured Europe will not be competitive in any way, and certainly lose importance in global affairs. 


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If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#39
MarcZ

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Sure looks like that's where the world (especially the West) is headed. Europe will break up into far right, isolationist regimes, the US will follow the same trend, and power and prosperity will overwhelmingly shift to the East. At least China will carry on the legacy. 

 

This is being over-dramatic... 

Over-dramatic? Power is shifting East to China, regardless of the EU breaking up or not. However, a fractured Europe will not be competitive in any way, and certainly lose importance in global affairs. 

 

 

China's economy is in the crapper right now if you haven't realized. The country is facing increasing problems with the huge debts its corporations have racked up and is a pyramid scheme on the verge of collapse. China will be lucky to avoid major internal strife in the next 20 years let alone be some all powerful savior of the world. 



#40
Humey

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In other news, Hilary Benn (shadow foreign secretary) has been sacked from his position. 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...litics-36632539

 

And Heidi Alexander (shadow health secretary) has now resigned as well. More resignations are apparently coming. 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-36632956

 

960418dbc1cfd8e15c6d93ff16575ae9.jpg






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