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Vertical Farming News and Discussions

vertical farming news vertical farms ftw

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#1
Jakob

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Since this is one of the key technologies that will revolutionize agriculture and allow the world to support hundreds of billions or trillions, and it's really starting to take off, let's have a news thread on it.

 

Global Vertical Farming Industry Worth $6.81 Billion by 2022 - Emerging Need For Sustainable Farming Operations - Research and Markets

 

The global vertical farming market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 27.77% through 2015 to 2022.

The emerging need of sustainable farming operations, decreasing arable land and scarcity of natural resources enabled the introduction of vertical farming at the global level. The market largely comprises of growth mechanisms, components and fixtures required for the viable vertical farming operations. The growth in the market is accredited to the overall cost effectiveness of the technology, increasing global food demand and the customization option provided to the users.

My commentary: The main timeline's 2025 prediction for vertical farming could be moved forward two or three years. See also this report.

 

Old steel mill in N.J. to become world's largest vertical farm

 

NEWARK, N.J. - Stacks of leafy greens are sprouting inside an old brewery in New Jersey.

[...]

AeroFarms is one of several companies creating new ways to grow indoors year-round to solve problems like the drought out West, frost in the South or other unfavourable conditions affecting farmers. The company is in the process of building what an industry group says is the world's largest commercial vertical farm at the site of an old steel mill in New Jersey's largest city.

It will contain 12 layers of growth on 3 1/2 acres, producing 2 million pounds of food per year. Production is set to begin next month.

My commentary: I already posted this, but too awesome not to post again.

 

In Cold Wyoming Winters, A New Vertical Farm Keeps Fresh Produce Local

 

If all goes according to plan, the three-story greenhouse will be harvesting more than 100,000 pounds of fresh, locally grown veggies annually. The founders of the greenhouse estimate it will offset 3% of the produce that currently has to be shipped into the valley. That kind of output, taking place on a tenth of an acre, would equate to the production of five acres of traditional agricultural land. "The power here is using a small amount of land to serve a community," says Vertical Harvest cofounder Nona Yehia.

By many accounts, it's working. On the top floor of the greenhouse, clusters of ruby red tomatoes already dangle from vines that hang near the ceiling. One story below, workers tend to trays of baby basil and sunflower cress basking in the warm glow of LED lights. In the background, bins of arugula are transported on conveyor belts across the width of the greenhouse and up and down its south-facing glass facade, feeding the plants on a combination of natural and artificial light.

My commentary: See, vertical farms are popping up everywhere. Also, YEAR-ROUND PRODUCE FUCK YEAH!!!

 

VERTICAL FARMS FOR THE WIN!!!


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#2
Jakob

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Now even the younger brother of High Elon is getting in on it.

 

Elon Musk's brother is building vertical farms in shipping containers

 

Entrepreneur Kimbal Musk — yes, he's Elon Musk's younger brother — is trying to grow a variety of things inside the old Pfizer factory in Brooklyn. Among them: a new agricultural venture, hundreds of pounds of leafy greens, and the next generation of young farmers.

Starting fall 2016, he and fellow entrepreneur Tobias Peggs are planning to launch a new urban farming incubator program, called Square Roots. Musk tells Business Insider that it will give young food-tech entrepreneurs spaces to develop and accelerate their vertical farming startups.

[...]

If the Square Roots campus of 10 farms is successful, Musk says the team will build more farms within New York City and eventually expand to other US cities.

 

And you know what? Each shipping container farm will have the yield of two freaking acres of conventional farmland. Once again, I fail to see how anyone can be a futurist and not a cornucopian.


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#3
Jakob

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Looks like a lot of individuals and small businesses are taking up vertical farming in their houses.

 

 

Marre Seleska’s house looks unimposing. Well-kept, sure, with a spacious kitchen and a room for her father Gene to smoke cigars in, but off the main road in the sleepy Carson County town of Panhandle.

In a repurposed sunroom near the back of the house, imposing burlap pillars filled with lettuce, kale and bok choy stretch from floor to ceiling, roots plunging downward into a growing medium made from recycled plastic bottles. This is where Green Wolf Vertical Farm holds court, and the luscious towers truly support the “vertical” aspect of Seleska’s brainchild.

 

Growing Greens in the Spare Room as ‘Vertical Farm’ Start-Ups Flourish

 

Dan Albert’s farm is far from traditional. There are no picturesque, rolling fields, no tractors tilling soil; there is no white farmhouse or red barn. For that matter, there is no soil, or sunlight.

The farm, Farmbox Greens, is inside a two-car garage behind Mr. Albert’s Seattle home. It consists of 600 square feet of microgreens grown in vertically stacked trays beneath LED lights.

The ability to grow in such a small space is the result of hydroponics, a system in which a plant’s roots sit in nutrient-rich water instead of soil.

Microgreens — the first, tiny greens on plants like arugula, radishes and bok choy — can go from seed to harvest in less than two weeks. That enables Farmbox Greens to compete on price against produce delivered from far away.

 

Funnily enough, I called this in Will's life in 100 years thread. It looks like it is beginning already. Perhaps this is the future of farming? People living in cities, but growing most of their own stuff? So much decentralization in every aspect of life...

 

Also, there are now companies that build vertical farms. Meta...


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Jakob

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HAHAHAHAHAHA even TreeHugger admits that vertical farms are pretty useful after all!

 

I was wrong about vertical farms; Aerofarms shows how to make them really work.

 

For a long time this TreeHugger was dismissive of vertical farms, agreeing with Adam Stein who wrote that "Using urban real estate in this manner is incredibly wasteful: bad for the economy and bad for the environment. Local food has its merits, but that's what New Jersey is for." As recently as a year ago I was calling them wrong on so many levels.

I was wrong.

 

I told ya so.


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Yuli Ban

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And you know what? Each shipping container farm will have the yield of two freaking acres of conventional farmland. Once again, I fail to see how anyone can be a futurist and not a cornucopian.

It's very easy to be a futurist and a cornucopian. It's much harder justifying why we should have infinitely more mouths to take from that cornucopia.


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#6
Jakob

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And you know what? Each shipping container farm will have the yield of two freaking acres of conventional farmland. Once again, I fail to see how anyone can be a futurist and not a cornucopian.

It's very easy to be a futurist and a cornucopian. It's much harder justifying why we should have infinitely more mouths to take from that cornucopia.

 

Okay...I'll play this on your terms. I've been reading Orion's Arm and it's given me good ideas.

 

Here's one: transcendence gardens (my term, not theirs, but roughly based on a random paragraph I saw there). The more people we have, the more diversity of cultures, ideologies, and even physical forms we have. Should be obvious. And more diversity, in addition to creating vast numbers of rich and strange cultures and ideas, will allow more paths to posthuman and hyperintelligence. More paths means we can discover the most viable, efficient, and powerful transcendence processes. Whereas if there are only a few people, far fewer paths to hyperintelligence will be discovered, reducing the likelihood of finding the best ways to ascend.

 

There, a Singulatarian explanation for Cornucopianism.


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Alislaws

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So what

 It's much harder justifying why we should have infinitely more mouths to take from that cornucopia.

 

Its also really hard to justify any anti population growth policy like sterilizing large sections of the worlds population. Or seizing "illegal" children from their parents, or maybe just killing them, (after all you want to keep the population down and raising them would take resources that cant be spared)

 

"All those dirty poor people breeding like rats means less resources for your massively wasteful society. Of course its much better to just force them to stop breeding, the alternative would require restructuring the whole way people use land and investing in new technologies. "

 

/end sarcasm


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Well, we've had vertical farms and  vertical farm companies, now it's vertical farm robots.

This Giant Vertical Farming Robot Is Coming For Your Crops

 

Enter California agricultural tech company FodderWorks (a division of Simply Country, Inc). FodderWorks has created a fully automated robotic fodder-growing system that can produce daily quantities of fresh, non-genetically-modified food for livestock. It takes a system that already greatly reduces water and land use, and maximizes it even further, by making it faster. You can watch the robot work in a dramatic video posted by Fodder Works on YouTube (above). It’s like Ridley Scott’s take on ag-tech.

 

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Jakob

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This is older, but yes it is possible to grow grains in vertical farms.

Aeroponic Vertical Farm: High-Yield Terraced Rice Paddies for the Philippines

 

With over 3 billion people around the globe relying on rice as their major food staple, there is high demand not only for the grain, but also the land on which to grow it. The Philippines is one of many countries that struggles to maintain food production while devoting land for housing and other industries. A solution, proposed by Jin Ho Kim, however, would see the construction of vertical farms expressly designed for the cultivation of rice. Using aeroponic growing technologies, rice can be grown compactly with minimal water while creating jobs and supplying food for the area.

 

Let's hope someone runs with thus!


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#10
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https://futurism.com...g/?src=featured


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Vertical Farming Is Officially Coming to Grocery Stores

 

In Brief German startup Infarm is putting modular, vertical farms directly into grocery stores, giving customers the ability to pick fresh crops and drop them straight into their grocery baskets.

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Berlin Startup Infarm Aims To Put Tiny Vertical Farms In Grocery Stores

July 11th, 2017 by Derek Markham

 

The future of fresh local produce could include distributed farming, with more foods being grown in smaller systems right near the point of sale, instead of everything being shipped in from larger growing operations.

 

https://cleantechnic...grocery-stores/


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To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#13
Yuli Ban

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Billionaires make it rain on Plenty, the indoor farming startup

"Vertical indoor farms, which can produce crops at yields 530 times greater than that of a typical field."

SoftBank Vision Fund, the huge tech-investment vehicle helmed by Japanese billionaire Masayoshi Son, has led a $200 million investment into indoor farming startup Plenty.
Joining Son on his trip out to back the (indoor) farm movement are notable tech billionaires Eric Schmidt and Jeff Bezos through their investment firms Innovation Endeavors and Bezos Expeditions. Previous investors, including the venture firm DCM, also participated in the round.
The round will be used to support the global rollout of Plenty’s vertical indoor farms, which can produce crops at yields 530 times greater than that of a typical field.
Plenty farms can grow anything except tree fruit and root vegetables, and the company will sell its veggies at costs that are competitive with typical prices for organic vegetables.
Chief executive Matt Barnard calls the veggies “super organics,” or beyond organic, because there are no pesticides or chemicals of any kind used in the cultivation of Plenty’s crops.
As a result of the investment, Jeffrey Housenbold will join the Plenty board of directors.


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#14
Jakob

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Berlin Startup Infarm Aims To Put Tiny Vertical Farms In Grocery Stores

July 11th, 2017 by Derek Markham

 

The future of fresh local produce could include distributed farming, with more foods being grown in smaller systems right near the point of sale, instead of everything being shipped in from larger growing operations.

 

https://cleantechnic...grocery-stores/

He reposted the same story that I did, but got all the likes?


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This High-Tech Vertical Farm Promises Whole Foods Quality at Walmart Prices

SoftBank-backed Plenty is out to build massive indoor farms on the outskirts of every major city on Earth

Plenty acknowledges that its model is only part of the solution to the global nutrition gap, that other novel methods and conventional farming will still be needed. Barnard is careful not to frame his crusade in opposition to anyone, including the industrial farms and complex supply chain he’s trying to circumvent. He’s focused on proving that growing rooms such as the one in South San Francisco can reliably deliver Whole Foods quality at Walmart prices. Even with $200 million in hand, it won’t be easy. “You’re talking about seriously scaling,” says Sonny Ramaswamy, director of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, the investment arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “The question then becomes, are things going to fall apart? Are you going to be able to maintain quality control?”
The idea of growing food indoors in unlikely places such as warehouses and rooftops has been hyped for decades. It presents a compelling solution to a series of intractable problems, including water shortages, the scarcity of arable land, and a farming population that’s graying as young people eschew the agriculture industry in greater numbers. It also promises to reduce the absurd waste built into international grocery routes. The U.S. imports some 35 percent of fruits and vegetables, according to Bain & Co., and even leafy greens, most of which are produced in California or Arizona, travel an average of 2,000 miles before reaching a retailer. In other words, vegetables that are going to be appealing and edible for two weeks or less spend an awful lot of that time in transit.


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#16
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What I really want to see is a vertical farm that can produce staple crops like wheat, not just fancy leafy greens. I've seen some suggestions floating around that we use dwarf versions of such crops, and the math is pretty promising--a 30-story 2 hectare building could produce as much as a 1000-hectare field. But why hasn't anyone done it yet?


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Softbank and Bezos backed vertical farm startup has global expansion plans

 

Plenty is a startup that has big vertical farming expansion plans $226 million in total venture funding. They plan to build a 100,000 square foot (2.3 acres) vertical-farming warehouse this year in Washington state outside of Seattle. That farm is expected to produce 4.5 million pounds of greens annually.

Plenty grows plants on 20-foot high towers with vertical irrigation channels and facing LED lights.

MAKE VEGGIES GREAT AGAIN!

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Unity

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And you know what? Each shipping container farm will have the yield of two freaking acres of conventional farmland. Once again, I fail to see how anyone can be a futurist and not a cornucopian.

It's very easy to be a futurist and a cornucopian. It's much harder justifying why we should have infinitely more mouths to take from that cornucopia.
Never fear. In the developed economies child birth rate drops to one child per woman with greater educational opportunities and economic opportunities. For the most part you will will see this trend continue into the future. It's Africa and India that we have to worry about

#19
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And you know what? Each shipping container farm will have the yield of two freaking acres of conventional farmland. Once again, I fail to see how anyone can be a futurist and not a cornucopian.

It's very easy to be a futurist and a cornucopian. It's much harder justifying why we should have infinitely more mouths to take from that cornucopia.
Never fear. In the developed economies child birth rate drops to one child per woman with greater educational opportunities and economic opportunities. For the most part you will will see this trend continue into the future. It's Africa and India that we have to worry about

 

I am also sad that Africa and India will leave Western civilization in the dust and go on to conquer the stars, but with a proper pro-humanity and pro-advancement mindset, we can join them.


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#20
Yuli Ban

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And you know what? Each shipping container farm will have the yield of two freaking acres of conventional farmland. Once again, I fail to see how anyone can be a futurist and not a cornucopian.

It's very easy to be a futurist and a cornucopian. It's much harder justifying why we should have infinitely more mouths to take from that cornucopia.
Never fear. In the developed economies child birth rate drops to one child per woman with greater educational opportunities and economic opportunities. For the most part you will will see this trend continue into the future. It's Africa and India that we have to worry about

 

I am also sad that Africa and India will leave Western civilization in the dust and go on to conquer the stars, but with a proper pro-humanity and pro-advancement mindset, we can join them.

 

They won't conquer the stars. The cold fact is that their societies are ticking time bombs, likely to suffer sweeping collapse and break-up within 50 years. If not that, then certainly a rising trend of authoritarianism to whip them into shape.

Democracy only works with smaller populations. This is something China understands and India will soon learn themselves.


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