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Russia Watch Thread


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#41
Yuli Ban

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You missed one leader. Or, more accurately, they missed one leader. And I'm not talking about Medvedev.

 

Who?

 

Ol' Nick.

nicholas-ii-21032713-1-402.jpg

 

We're closing in on the Centennial celebrations of his collapse. Just a couple weeks, if I recall.


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#42
PhoenixRu

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Ah, this one... my answer: dislike. Silly and incompetent ruler. This may sound cynical, but he fully deserved his bullet.


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"And the Russian land, let God keep it! Under heavens, there is no other land like this. And although Russian nobles are not righteous neither kind, let God arrange the Russian land and give us enough justice" - Afanasy Nikitin, medieval traveler of XV century.


#43
Yuli Ban

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Ah, this one... my answer: dislike. Silly and incompetent ruler. This may sound cynical, but he fully deserved his bullet.

We agree on that, at least. 

 

As did the Tsarina.

 

I could go without the murder of their children; just ship them to a collective farm and reform them into proletarians, a la the Chinese emperor after Mao's revolution. One might say that they'd be a maypole for the Whites, but killing the children is worse. Now you have martyrs that even many radicals believe shouldn't have gotten the bullets and bayonets. 

It's better to have living traitors than dead martyrs. 


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#44
PhoenixRu

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I could go without the murder of their children; just ship them to a collective farm and reform them into proletarians, a la the Chinese emperor after Mao's revolution.

 

Don't forget, they were executed on peak of civil war, in frontline city, where was a very serious chance of their liberation by enemies of revolution who could then use them as puppet "legitimate monarchs of Russia". Other words, they just pulled a bad lottery ticket.


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"And the Russian land, let God keep it! Under heavens, there is no other land like this. And although Russian nobles are not righteous neither kind, let God arrange the Russian land and give us enough justice" - Afanasy Nikitin, medieval traveler of XV century.


#45
Maximus

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I'm curious, why is Stalin's popularity on the rise in Russia? Is it Soviet nostalgia? Or better said, nostalgia for when the USSR had a powerful leader who was unafraid to spit in America's face? Is it that Russians feel betrayed and let down by what came after the fall of communism (economic shock therapy, increased mortality and poverty, NATO expansion, etc)? I'm guessing it's all of the above.

 

I remember reading a history book about how Russia has continually been invaded due to its large size and geographic position, and how the people realized that only a strong ruler could keep the "barbarians" at bay. Given that Russia was last invaded little over 7 decades ago, I'm guessing that this mentality is still pretty prevalent in modern Russia.

 

Also, given this mentality of needing a strong ruler to keep the enemy at bay, do you think there's any hope of better relations with the West? I mean, there's no question that at least part of Putin's popularity can be attributed to his standing up to Russia's Western enemies. But what is the average Russian Joe's view of Trump? Do people really want better relations with Russia's Cold War arch nemesis? Or better said, do they believe it's practical? I mean, great power politics says otherwise, but I wanna know if people truly believe it's possible.


If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#46
PhoenixRu

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I'm curious, why is Stalin's popularity on the rise in Russia?

 

This is obvious:

 

1) Absolute modesty and honesty. Even his worst enemies have to admit he wasn't "big thief" type of ruler. No any personal palaces, no luxury cars... His personal way of life wasn't much different from one of ordinary Soviet citizen. This is a huge contrast with our modern rulers.

 

2) He turned mostly agrarian country into industrial, won the horrible war against much stronger (as it seemed in 1941) enemy and made USSR the superpower. Again, huge contrast with modern rulers.

 

These are main reasons. As for legendary "Stalin's repressions" with "tens of millions victims" - this is just a cold-war-era black myth, not confirmed by archive data (now open to historians) nor by common people's memory. Almost each Russian family remember someone fell in WW2, yet only very few families remember some victim of repressions.

 

In short, Stalin is a kind of archetypal Russian ruler: wise and strict father for his people, horrible nemesis to his/our enemies. Exactly what we need today, in these troublous times. And the more our homegrown nouveaux riches or our "western partners" barks on him, the more they're convincing us that Stalin is exactly what we need.


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"And the Russian land, let God keep it! Under heavens, there is no other land like this. And although Russian nobles are not righteous neither kind, let God arrange the Russian land and give us enough justice" - Afanasy Nikitin, medieval traveler of XV century.


#47
Yuli Ban

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Which makes me curious as to why Russia's going with a more conservative (as in classically conservative) order over communism. Unless the specifics don't matter? 
 
You know what, fuck it; don't answer that. 
 
I just want to know what the hell's up with Foundations of Geopolitics. It makes me a tad interested in learning how to subvert political order myself, though in the name of technism and machine mystery cultism. For whatever reason— whether it be due to the ideas being sound or worth believing in, or because of some charisma I didn't know I had— the whole Vyrdist spectrum has gained me followers.

 

I can respect the current model of Russia's opposition to liberalism and desire for a Eurasian order. I just vehemently oppose all forms of traditionalism. I'd love to unite the Americas (+Greenland) under one grand technate.


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Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#48
Maximus

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In short, Stalin is a kind of archetypal Russian ruler: wise and strict father for his people, horrible nemesis to his/our enemies. Exactly what we need today, in these troublous times. And the more our homegrown nouveaux riches or our "western partners" barks on him, the more they're convincing us that Stalin is exactly what we need.

 

 

Which leads back to this question:

 

 

Also, given this mentality of needing a strong ruler to keep the enemy at bay, do you think there's any hope of better relations with the West? I mean, there's no question that at least part of Putin's popularity can be attributed to his standing up to Russia's Western enemies. But what is the average Russian Joe's view of Trump? Do people really want better relations with Russia's Cold War arch nemesis? Or better said, do they believe it's practical? I mean, great power politics says otherwise, but I wanna know if people truly believe it's possible.


If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#49
PhoenixRu

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Which leads back to this question:

 

 

Also, given this mentality of needing a strong ruler to keep the enemy at bay, do you think there's any hope of better relations with the West? I mean, there's no question that at least part of Putin's popularity can be attributed to his standing up to Russia's Western enemies. But what is the average Russian Joe's view of Trump? Do people really want better relations with Russia's Cold War arch nemesis? Or better said, do they believe it's practical? I mean, great power politics says otherwise, but I wanna know if people truly believe it's possible.

 

I can't talk on behalf of all people. Yes, i want good relations with USA. No, i think this is impossible (at least, anytime soon). Quoting myself (from parallel thread):

 

Everyone knows my opinion, but here is it again (without trolling and colorful words): the future of US - Russian relations is very grim. For some deep historical and socio-cultural reasons USA (both elite and common people) are just incapable to see Russians as equals or recognize their political subjectivity. Any Russian attempt to behave as independent power (even not aimed against USA) will be automatically considered as audacious and hostile challenge to This Country.

 

This will not change with new names of US or Russian presidents.

 

Other words, friendship is only possible between equals. We can not be friends of nation oficially declaring itself "unique and exceptional, the last and the best hope of humankind". The more that reality is far from that.

 

This doesn't mean we should avoid any cooperation with USA.

 

Relation to Trump? Yes, there was a few days of silly euphoria when he won the election, but this is not because we love him. This is because we hated Hillary and monsters behind her back.


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"And the Russian land, let God keep it! Under heavens, there is no other land like this. And although Russian nobles are not righteous neither kind, let God arrange the Russian land and give us enough justice" - Afanasy Nikitin, medieval traveler of XV century.


#50
Time_Traveller

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It's a Lonelier World for Vladimir Putin

17 March 2017

 

Russian rulers have long been content to accept fear and awe in lieu of respect and admiration, and by that standard, Putin shone in 2016. This year that is proving a tougher gig to keep up, as he prepares for what might be his last presidential election in 2018.

Last year, Putin's boldness, combined with a bit of luck, paid off: The victories in Syria, the successful destabilization of Ukraine, the swelling support for populists in Western nations. Even the Russian economy provided some hopeful signs with something of an agricultural boom and the de-facto end of negative growth (economic output shrank just 0.2 percent last year). But the path to greatness Putin has chosen is a tough one: It's easier to make headlines than to turn them into tangible, long- or even medium-tern advantages.

Russia's efforts to cultivate an opposition to the continent's centrist elites look likely to backfire. The wise men at the Kremlin and the Russian foreign ministry never entertained much hope that Geert Wilders would become Dutch prime minister and veto a sanctions extension, or that National Front leader Marine Le Pen would win and dismantle the European Union altogether. French republican candidate Francois Fillon represented a far more solid hope -- an alternative to Germany's determination to treat Russia as an adversary. Fillon, however, has been tripped up by a satirical newspaper that discovered he had been paying his wife a parliamentary aide's salary; Putin has always underestimated the power of a free press, perhaps because he has limited experience with one.

 

https://www.bloomber...line&yptr=yahoo


I want to go ahead of Father Time with a scythe of my own.

H. G. Wells

#51
PhoenixRu

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Mass (not so mass, actually) protests, organized by "liberals" took place yesterday in many cities across Russia. This event would not be worth mentioning, if not for one, very worrysome, nuance... I suspect this will be the photo of the year:

 

Spoiler

 

People tend to laugh at that was already called "political paedophilia" - usage of not even teenagers, but children, for street protests - but this is not funny at all. This was actually very smart (though ugly and cynical) step of mr. Navalny and his foreign coordinators. During the last decade, we got a whole new generation who:

 

1) Grew up in relative stability, safety, and satiety.

2) Braindead and tend to blindly follow their "opinion leaders" from social networks.

3) Despite their own words about "cruel regime", not afraid of police at all.

 

This школота - "schoolscum" - which came to streets for fun and guided by older and much smarter scum, may become the serious force. Judged by official reaction - deafening silence in mainstream media - our authorities were caught off guard and simply don't know how to react.


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"And the Russian land, let God keep it! Under heavens, there is no other land like this. And although Russian nobles are not righteous neither kind, let God arrange the Russian land and give us enough justice" - Afanasy Nikitin, medieval traveler of XV century.


#52
eacao

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Mass (not so mass, actually) protests, organized by "liberals" took place yesterday in many cities across Russia. This event would not be worth mentioning, if not for one, very worrysome, nuance... I suspect this will be the photo of the year:

 

Spoiler

 

People tend to laugh at that was already called "political paedophilia" - usage of not even teenagers, but children, for street protests - but this is not funny at all. This was actually very smart (though ugly and cynical) step of mr. Navalny and his foreign coordinators. During the last decade, we got a whole new generation who:

 

1) Grew up in relative stability, safety, and satiety.

2) Braindead and tend to blindly follow their "opinion leaders" from social networks.

3) Despite their own words about "cruel regime", not afraid of police at all.

 

This школота - "schoolscum" - which came to streets for fun and guided by older and much smarter scum, may become the serious force. Judged for official reaction - deafening silence in mainstream media - our authorities were caught off guard and simply don't know how to react.

Basically the 'socialist alternative' buffoons rampant throughout Australian Unis. Would copy and paste what you wrote to describe them. 


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You don't decide your future. You decide your habits, and your habits decide your future.
Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. - Abraham Lincoln.

#53
caltrek

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Personally, I don't see anything inherently wrong with young folks participating in protests. It is only the excessively repressive government that puts them at risk for doing so. At any rate, it is important to note what was being protested.

 

Russian Protest Leader Alexei Navalny Sentenced to 15 Days in Jail

 

http://www.csmonitor...s-in-jail-video

 

Extract:

 

MARCH 27, 2017 

 

  —Vocal Kremlin opponent Alexei Navalny is facing a 15-day jail sentence after organizing protests in Russia on Sunday that decried government corruption and led to some 1,000 arrests.

 

Mr. Navalny was found guilty of disobeying a police officer at a Moscow protest, and fined for organizing the demonstrations, which Russian authorities say were illegal.

One of the most vocal critics of the current government and corruption, Navalny organized the demonstrations to call for the resignation of Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev, who he claims used government funds for personal expenses. While Russian officials say the protests were unauthorized and jeopardized safety, critics say the police used heavy-handed tactics and have wrongfully detained those voicing their opinions.

 

"Even the slightest illusion of fair justice is absent here," Navalny told reporters Monday, when he appeared in court. "Yesterday's events have shown that quite a large number of voters in Russia support the program of a candidate who stands for fighting corruption. These people demand political representation – and I strive to be their political representative."

 

 

The protests, which took place in some 80 cities across the country, were the largest since 2012 and come a year before Russian President Vladimir Putin is set to seek re-election.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#54
SkittleBlu

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Seems like Russia's gonna collapse sooner than I thought....



#55
Alislaws

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Seems like Russia's gonna collapse sooner than I thought....

you may be overestimating the scale of these protests.



#56
PhoenixRu

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Seems like Russia's gonna collapse sooner than I thought....

 

Не дождётесь  :biggrin:


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"And the Russian land, let God keep it! Under heavens, there is no other land like this. And although Russian nobles are not righteous neither kind, let God arrange the Russian land and give us enough justice" - Afanasy Nikitin, medieval traveler of XV century.


#57
BarkEater93

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What's the general view from older folks on these protests? Do they still have a high approval of the Kremlin?



#58
PhoenixRu

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Personally, I don't see anything inherently wrong with young folks participating in protests.

 

Yeah, as long as they weren't openly promised 10 000 euro to each detained that encouraged them to attack police. And here is one of them, young "freedom fighter" sitting in police car and fantasizing how will he spend his future reward. Btw, unlike you, this young man is well aware that "excessively repressive government" will not do him any harm:

 

 

PS there are many fields where i disagree with our current regime. But when i see these cheap minions (both young and adult) pretending to "struggle against corruption" for 10 000 euro reward from their idol... reward they'll never get & this is clear to anyone except them... they can not cause any feelings other than disgust. 


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"And the Russian land, let God keep it! Under heavens, there is no other land like this. And although Russian nobles are not righteous neither kind, let God arrange the Russian land and give us enough justice" - Afanasy Nikitin, medieval traveler of XV century.


#59
PhoenixRu

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And something else about "struggle against corruption"... just as example, here are today's news. The tiny part of real and hard work, and not a sheap buffonery of mr. Navalny:

 

Vice Director of the Hermitage placed under house arrest. He is suspected of fraud...

 

The mayor of Vladivostok is accused of a bribe of 75 million rubles...
 
A new episode appeared In the criminal case of the mayor of Vladivostok. It's about getting a bribe. According to investigators, its size amounted to more than 12 million rubles...
 
Investigators conduct a search in the apartments of the ex-governor of the Chelyabinsk region...

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"And the Russian land, let God keep it! Under heavens, there is no other land like this. And although Russian nobles are not righteous neither kind, let God arrange the Russian land and give us enough justice" - Afanasy Nikitin, medieval traveler of XV century.


#60
caltrek

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Russia’s Young People are Putin’s Long-Term Challenge

 

https://nonprofitqua...term-challenge/

 

Introduction

 

Last Sunday, protests against alleged corruption in the Russian federal government erupted simultaneously in nearly 100 cities across the country and in London, Prague, Basel, and Bonn. The demonstrations were the largest outpouring of anti-Kremlin sentiment since the Snow Revolution protests in Moscow between 2011 and 2013, the root of the hostility between Putin and Hillary Clinton that allegedly disrupted the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

 

The protests on Sunday were triggered by the apparent indifference of the Russian authorities to the investigative 50-minute documentary, He Is Not Dimon To You. The film by Alexei Navalny and the Anti-Corruption Foundation was posted on YouTube on March 2nd. It received 1.5 million views by the first day and more than 14.3 million views as of this writing.

 

Instead of directly confronting Putin, Navalny shrewdly focused his film on the alleged corrupt affairs of the much-disliked Prime Minister of Russia, Dmitry Medvedev. The film alleges, among other crimes, that Medvedev embezzled an estimated $1.2 billion. The film is named after an interview with Medvedev’s press secretary. She criticized the use of the nickname “Dimon” when speaking about Medvedev on social media. In Russian, Dimon is a nickname like “Jim” for “James” in English, only even more familiar and, in this case, disrespectful.

 

On March 10th, Medvedev banned Navalny on Instagram. Navalny urged countrywide street protests on March 26th. The stated goal was to force Putin and Medvedev to respond to Navalny’s accusations. Protesters used posters, slogans, chanting, and suggestive objects like yellow rubber ducks, and sneakers. These objects were a nod to the allegation that Medvedev has a duck pond at one of his properties and a reference to Navalny’s corruption probe, which highlighted Medvedev’s apparent penchant for expensive athletic shoes.

 

Local police and anti-riot forces immediately confronted the protestors. The New York Times looks at how these protesters were younger than those who participated in the Snow Revolution.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls





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