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Russia Watch Thread


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#61
caltrek

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Putin Compares Anti-Corruption Protests to 'Arab Spring' and 'Euromaidan'

 

https://themoscowtim...uromaidan-57586

 

Introduction

 

Russian President Vladimir Putin has compared anti-corruption protests that erupted throughout Russia over the weekend to Tunisia's 2011 Arab Spring and Ukraine’s 2014 Euromaidan revolution.

 

“I personally support the anti-corruption issue being at the center of public attention,” Putin said, before going on to criticize “political forces” which use the issue to promote themselves in the run up to elections, the Republic news site reported.

 

“This is a tool of the Arab Spring,” he added. “We know very well what this leads to. This was the reason for the coup d’etat in Ukraine, and it plunged the country into chaos.”

Referring to Sunday’s protests, Putin also emphasized that anyone who breaks the law should be punished in accordance with Russian legislation.

 

The president’s comments come four days after thousands of Russians across the country heeded the call of opposition leader Alexei Navalny and took to the streets to protest entrenched corruption in government. The rallies — undoubtedly the largest since 2011 — followed an investigation by Navalny’s Anti-Corruption Fund, which alleged Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev masterminded a vast corruption scheme.

6310f6f48d3a4c5b8516daa656312dbc.jpg


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#62
BarkEater93

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These protests are definitely not trivial, they were pretty coordinated and had a breadth that spanned across the country in over 90 cities. People in both major urban areas and smaller remote towns took part.

 

Despite Putin trying to consolidate power and control in the government (by creating the National Guard, changing the FSB, all the purging among other things), the Kremlin is still facing obstacles. Some 80,000 people have taken to the streets in a show of anti-Kremlin. And this is something that won't easily go away. Putin still has high approval ratings but the government doesn't, and that's whats on shaky ground.



#63
PhoenixRu

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These protests are definitely not trivial...

 

Definitely not. This is a serious and direct threat to Russian statehood:

 

 

 

Russian President Vladimir Putin has compared anti-corruption protests that erupted throughout Russia over the weekend to Tunisia's 2011 Arab Spring and Ukraine’s 2014 Euromaidan revolution.

 

“This is a tool of the Arab Spring,” he added. “We know very well what this leads to. This was the reason for the coup d’etat in Ukraine, and it plunged the country into chaos.”

 

 

We are very well remember what happened in Ukraine. And we are very well aware why mr.Navalny so much supported and so generously financed by our enemies and why all the mainstream Western media collectively and unanimously masturbating on him...

 

In this situation, ignoring and underestimating of the level of threat may become fatal. I can only pray and hope Putin (or his future successor) will not make such a mistake.



#64
Yuli Ban

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A new $100 million Russian investment fund is targeting AI startups globally

Global AI investment fever has hit Russia, with a recently launched $100 million fund making its inaugural investments.
Announced in late 2016, the fund is backed by Larnabel VC, the venture arm of the Gutseriev family, one of the richest in Russia, and VP Capital, the investment vehicle of Belarussian businessman Viktor Prokopenya.
The joint fund is sector-agnostic. “We are interested in a wide range of companies that apply AI technologies in interesting, unique, and impactful ways. We don’t restrict ourselves to specific industries or sectors. We are interested in every application of artificial intelligence, from fintech to entertainment, to education, and beyond,” Prokopenya told East-West Digital News.


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Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#65
Yuli Ban

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Chechnya detains 100 gay men in first concentration camps since the Holocaust

More than 100 gay men have been detained in concentration camp-style prisons in the Russian region of Chechnya, according to reports by local newspapers and human rights organisations.
The arrests are being made as part of a widespread anti-LGBT purge in the area. The prison camps are the first to be established for LGBT people since the Second World War.
The information was first published by the Novaya Gazeta, an independent Russian newspaper, which reported that men were being arrested and kept in concentration camp prisons where violence and abuse is commonplace.
Repressions against the LGBT community began after an application for a gay rights march in the Chechen capital of Grozny.

Erm, since the Balkan wars, surely? And North Korea?


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#66
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Chechnya detains 100 gay men in first concentration camps since the Holocaust

More than 100 gay men have been detained in concentration camp-style prisons in the Russian region of Chechnya, according to reports by local newspapers and human rights organisations.
The arrests are being made as part of a widespread anti-LGBT purge in the area. The prison camps are the first to be established for LGBT people since the Second World War.
The information was first published by the Novaya Gazeta, an independent Russian newspaper, which reported that men were being arrested and kept in concentration camp prisons where violence and abuse is commonplace.
Repressions against the LGBT community began after an application for a gay rights march in the Chechen capital of Grozny.

Erm, since the Balkan wars, surely? And North Korea?

 

It's 2017 and yet people are still so uncultured enough to send people to concentration camps for things they, (the victims,) can scarcely control.


Let us all come together and help save the world, one tree at a time.


#67
Alislaws

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It's 2017 and yet people are still so uncultured enough to send people to concentration camps for things they, (the victims,) can scarcely control.

The world is run by people who grew up in the 1960s, which were pretty racist, intolerant times, even in western liberal democracies.



#68
Sciencerocks

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It's 2017 and yet people are still so uncultured enough to send people to concentration camps for things they, (the victims,) can scarcely control.

The world is run by people who grew up in the 1960s, which were pretty racist, intolerant times, even in western liberal democracies.

 

 

 

Same is true about the mindset that a person should break their back in order to go to college or any of these other individualist crocks of shit(healthcare being another!) that people in the 50's and 60's that are now are ruling class believe(republican mostly!). Hopefully the new generation will be more liberal and caring.


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#69
BasilBerylium

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Spoiler


#70
caltrek

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I suppose certain people are going to want to contract out a hit man to go after me for posting this.   :mole:

Interview with Alexei Navalny: 'The Kremlin Blocks Every Alternative to Putin'

 

http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/interview-with-alexei-navalny-about-protests-and-putin-a-1143752.html

 

Introduction:

 

At the end of March, Russia's best-known opposition figure, Alexei Navalny, 40, called for nationwide protests against corruption and tens of thousands of people took to the streets. Afterward, he was detained for 15 days. He was released on Monday, April 10 and met with reporters from DER SPIEGEL one day later for an interview at the offices of his Anti-Corruption Foundation in a Moscow business center. Navalny's spirits were high and he came across as combative. He was still planning to travel to other parts of Russia to promote his potential candidacy for the presidency in 2018. He has called for further national protests to be held on June 12.

 

SPIEGEL: Mr. Navalny, you've just been released from jail. What was it like?

 

Navalny: You have to imagine jail like a dirty dormitory where you don't do anything except sleep and read. We were four people to a cell. The others were normal people -- one had had a fight with a neighbor, another had insulted a police officer. No other political prisoners like me. They are carefully separated from one another, even during yard exercise.

SPIEGEL: Did you still talk with the other prisoners about politics?

 

Navalny: For days. All of them had heard of me, all of them wanted to talk. Even the police officers with whom I sat in the bus after my arrest had seen my film about Prime Minister

Dmitry Medvedev. They asked what everyone always asks: Why I haven't been killed, and why I haven't been put in prison yet.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#71
PhoenixRu

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I suppose certain people are going to want to contract out a hit man to go after me for posting this.   :mole:

 

But who is this villain?

 

Your love for mr.Navalny only proves how far you are from my country and my people, that's all.



#72
caltrek

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I suppose certain people are going to want to contract out a hit man to go after me for posting this.   :mole:

 

But who is this villain?

 

Your love for mr.Navalny only proves how far you are from my country and my people, that's all.

 

 

Love for Mr. Navalny?

 

I do not even know the man.  I am simply passing along an interview in Der Spiegel.  An interview conducted with a Russian. 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#73
BarkEater93

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Russia Bans Group Led by a Kremlin Critic as More Protests Loom

 

https://www.nytimes....t-protests.html



#74
PhoenixRu

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Despite being a marginal minority, in some cases fans of mr.Navalny may become very aggressive defending their idol:

 

Yana Mamaeva, the journalist of the Krasnoyarsk Eighth Channel, was subjected to numerous insults in social networks after she published the story about the recreation of the famous Russian oppositionist Alexei Navalny in Barcelona, ​​calling his trip an "ophthalmological tourism". In her material Mamaeva questioned the version that the politician went to Spain exactly for medical treatment, described the five-star hotel in Barcelona, ​​and raised the issue of ethical permissibility for a fighter against corruption and luxury to afford such an expensive vacation abroad. Yana Mamaeva herself commented that almost immediately after the release of the story she was subjected to insulting SMS as well as insults and attacks in social networks...
 
It should be noted that after the sunday rally of the opponents of renovation***, from which Alexey Navalny was removed by police officers, one of rally organizers, journalist Ekaterina Vinokurova, was also subjected to insults and harassment...
 
*** They mean the current "program of housing renovation" aimed to replace all the Khrushchev-era blocks with modern houses.
 
 
Nothing new for those who live in Russia. Our "liberal opposition" is much more prone to sectarianism, сult of personality, and аggressive intolerance than majority of "vatniks". "Navalny is our main national treasure, if we will lose him, we will lose everything!"  :biggrin:


#75
Time_Traveller

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Navalny 'detained' before Moscow protest

12 June 2017

 

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny detained at home ahead of planned protests in Moscow, his wife says

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...europe-40245152


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#76
PhoenixRu

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Navalny 'detained' before Moscow protest

12 June 2017

 

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny detained at home ahead of planned protests in Moscow, his wife says

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...europe-40245152

 

This guy is disgusting provocateur, modern twin of Georgy Gapon. Again and again, deliberately, he throwing his young faithful hamsters into clash with police. Even this your BBC article says:

 

 

Mr Navalny was earlier granted permission to hold a rally at Sakharova Avenue but changed the location - without permission - on the eve of the demonstration to Tverskaya Street, near the Kremlin.

 

 

Why would he do it? The answer is obvious: he doesn't need just a calm and peaceful rally, he need exactly the bloody clashes and arrests, so the western media would get "heartbreaking" pictures like these:

 

Spoiler

 

Many of his young followers still consider this a game & sincerely believing in 10.000 USD compensation he promised to each detained - if not right now, then right "after the fall of regime". Here they are, today's happy arrestants waiting for their generous reward:

 

Spoiler

 

And, as always, western media demonstrating their deep understanding of Russia:

 

Spoiler

 

=== === ===

 

In short, this all is sad and pathetic. I can understand those who are against Putin, but will never understand/respect those brainless hamsters who follow Navalny.



#77
Alislaws

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This guy is disgusting provocateur. Again and again, deliberately, he's throwing his young faithful hamsters into clash with police. Even this your BBC article says:

 

 

Mr Navalny was earlier granted permission to hold a rally at Sakharova Avenue but changed the location - without permission - on the eve of the demonstration to Tverskaya Street, near the Kremlin.

 

 

Why would he do it? The answer is obvious: he doesn't need just a calm and peaceful rally, he need exactly the bloody clashes and arrests, so the western media would get "heartbreaking" pictures like these:

...

In short, this all is sad and pathetic.

 

 

In terms of playing up to the western media, what do you think his end game is? My only thought would be trying to get enough hostility to Putin's govt so that sanctions etc. get imposed, and the resulting economic problems can lead to him losing power?

 

Is he funded by western interests? Or is he just using them for his own gain?

 

I don't think there are any likely circumstances where some western country (or countries) try to pull a "regime change" (that would work even worse than Irag, if thats possible!)



#78
PhoenixRu

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1) In terms of playing up to the western media, what do you think his end game is? My only thought would be trying to get enough hostility to Putin's govt so that sanctions etc. get imposed, and the resulting economic problems can lead to him losing power?

 

2) Is he funded by western interests? Or is he just using them for his own gain?

 

1) No idea. I just don't see any legal way for him to come to power. His only possible way lays through total collapse of statehood and "maidan" in Ukrainian style. But this will be a difficult task. Russian ruling elite is much stronger and smarter than their Ukrainian collegues. And second, Navalny's fan base are middle class hipsters and timid office hamsters, not trained and armed fascist militants like it was in Ukraine.

 

2) Again, no idea. I suspect, he's a hollow character, without any own vision. Right now he's just talking what his audience want to hear. "I will return Crimea to Ukraine and focus on domestic issues" - to western journalists, "i'll immediately deport all immigrants and imprison corrupt officials" - to his fans inside Russia.



#79
BarkEater93

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These latest protests are just the face of much deeper issues. It wouldn't really have been very different if Navalny wasn't the opposition leader and coordinating the protests. Or if Putin wasn't the current president. Putin's approval is still pretty high; and his position being re-elected still pretty solid. It's the Kremlin that's not.

 

These issues go right into Russia's core. And they're growing... 



#80
PhoenixRu

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^ ^ ^

Each country have problems of some kind. The only difference is that without Putin it would have been, perhaps, hungry riots instead of "riots" of bored teenagers with their new iPhones and existential angst.

 

PS the whole thing in one picture:

 

DCH-T02XoAAnlV6.jpg






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