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Uplifting & Positive News and Discussions

uplifting positive light futurology restore faith in humanity

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#1
Yuli Ban

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They say we're living in the most peaceful and wealthy period in human history, so why doesn't it feel like it? Simple: the news media. They know that "Here's Why We're All Gonna Die" is going to push more copies than "Here's Why We're Not Gonna Die". You can see the media's control of popular zeitgeists in many different ways. For example, televised high-speed chases were almost non-existent in the mainstream before O.J. Simpson's infamous low-speed chase in 1994. Afterwards, there were whole programming blocs dedicated to showing off the most intense, flashiest police chases, and the media would stop everything they did just to show us an ongoing chase. 

 

It's a basic human instinct to worry about the bad. It's a basic biological instinct to worry about the bad, as it's tied to our survival. It's better to assume that the rustling you heard outside the tribe's camp was a voracious lion instead of a meek rodent.

 

So here's the thread to talk about positive developments in our world. Things that restore your faith in humanity, even a little. If not humanity, then in nature.

 

It can be anything noteworthy.

 

  • Random acts of kindness
  • Large-scale acts of humanity
  • Bits of humanity within inhuman darkness
  • Kindness towards animals
  • Kindness from animals
  • Restoring Earth
  • Things that promote an improvement in the human/animal/plant condition
  • Great breakthroughs towards eradicating poverty/disease/hunger
  • Positive trends
  • Anything else I missed, including something that affects yourself

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#2
wjfox

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Fewer and fewer children are dying before the age of 5.

 

http://www.futuretim...-mortality-2030

 

 

childhood-mortality-future-trend-2030.jp


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#3
Erowind

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I know this was posted elsewhere on the forum when it was new, but this is one of the greatest things happening right now.

 

https://www.weforum....or-achievement/

 

151216-global-poverty-percentage-1990-20


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Current status: slaving away for the math gods of Pythagoras VII.


#4
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We always hear about Cold Wars, World Wars, Nuclear Wars... but what about Green Wars?
 

India Plants 50 Million Trees in One Day, Smashing World Record

World Record Previously Held By Pakistan

Although the feat has yet to be certified by Guinness World Records, Indian officials have reported that volunteers planted a whopping 49.3 million tree saplings on July 11, blowing past the previous record for most trees planted in a single day.

That record, a mere 847,275 trees, was set by Pakistan in 2013.


A reported 800,000 volunteers from Uttar Pradesh worked for 24 hours planting 80 different species of trees along roads, railways, and on public land. The saplings were raised on local nurseries.


The effort is part of the commitment India made at the Paris Climate Conference in December 2015. In the agreement, signed on Earth Day 2016, India agreed to spend $6 billion to reforest 12 percent of its land (bringing total forest cover to 235 million acres by 2030, or about 29 percent of the country's territory).


Trees sequester carbon dioxide from the air, thereby reducing the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. India has experienced substantial loss of its forest cover over the past few centuries, as people cut down trees for firewood, pasture, and to make room for development.


Other countries are also replanting trees. In December, African nations pledged to reforest 100 million hectares. A wide range of stakeholders, from countries to companies, also signed on to the non-binding New York Declaration of Forests that month, with the goal of halving deforestation by 2020 and ending it by 2030. The declaration also seeks to restore at leat 350 million hectares of degraded land with healthy forests.


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#5
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Remember the Ice Bucket Challenge in 2014? Its funds helped discover the gene linked to ALS

People thought it was silly two summers ago, but the Ice Bucket Challenge Internet sensation actually gathered enough funds to make an important breakthrough in ALS research.
The University of Massachusetts Medical School's Project MinE recently discovered the gene that is responsible for ALS. Project MinE scientists were able to research this gene with help from the ALS Association, which donated $1 million from the Ice Bucket Challenge.
The identified gene is NEK1, which its variants could provide clues to understanding and potentially treating familial and sporadic ALS.


Wouldn't it be something if a meme wound up eradicating a disease?


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#6
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Global tiger population up by 22 per cent

The number of wild tigers has gone up to 3,890, from the earlier 2010 estimate of 3200, according to the World Wildlife Fund and the Global Tiger Forum
There is good news for wildlife enthusiasts ahead of the 3rd Asia Ministerial Conference on Tiger Conservation that takes off tomorrow in New Delhi. The number of wild tigers has gone up globally by 22 per cent to 3,890, from the earlier 2010 estimate of 3200, based on the best available data, according to the World Wildlife Fund and the Global Tiger Forum (GTF). The conservation meet will be opened by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday, who represents the country that leads tiger population countries with an estimated population of 2226, according to a 2014 national survey. India’s own tiger population has gone up significantly from 1706, as per its own national estimates, reported by the IUCN in 2010.
The updated minimum figure, compiled from International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) data and the latest national tiger surveys, can be attributed to multiple factors including increases in tiger populations in India, Russia, Nepal and Bhutan, improved surveys and enhanced protection. “For the first time after decades of constant decline, tiger numbers are on the rise. This offers us great hope and shows that we can save species and their habitats when governments, local communities and conservationists work together,” said Marco Lambertini, Director General of WWF International.


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#7
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Brewery invents edible 6-Pack rings designed to feed marine life instead of killing It if they end up in the ocean

Saltwater Brewery, a craft beer company, wants consumers to toast to saving the ocean with their innovative edible six-pack rings.        
The company, based in Delray Beach, Florida, is responsible for creating 100% biodegradable six-pack rings that will feed marine animals rather than harm them if it ends up in the ocean. The rings are made of material consisting of barley and wheat left over from the brewing process.
 
In their video, Saltwater Brewery provided some alarming statistics. Americans alone drank 6.3 billion gallons of beer last year, which most typically was contained in cans. A majority of the plastic rings encasing those cans make their way to the ocean.


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Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#8
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‘Big Success Story’: Sri Lanka Is Declared Free of Malaria

After a long struggle, Sri Lanka, the large island nation southeast of India, was declared free of malaria last week by the World Health Organization. It has been more than three years since the last case.
“This is a big success story,” said Dr. Pedro L. Alonso, the director of the W.H.O.’s global malaria program. “And it’s an example for other countries.”
Sri Lanka almost succeeded in eliminating malaria 50 years ago, but its huge effort fell apart. The country became the example most frequently cited by malariologists to show how defeat could be pried from the jaws of victory.
Through the 1940s, Sri Lanka routinely had a million cases of malaria a year. Then officials began an intensive public health campaign, relying on DDT to kill mosquitoes and chloroquine to cure the disease. By 1963, the annual caseload had fallen to a mere 17.
Then the drive ran out of money and faltered, and annual cases of malaria rose above 500,000 by 1969. By then, mosquitoes had evolved resistance to DDT, and by 1992 to its successor, malathion. Malaria parasites first showed resistance to chloroquine in 1984.
But the failure also was political: The country’s ethnic fabric disintegrated.
Sri Lanka had been the British colony of Ceylon, an exporter of tea and cinnamon. After its independence in 1948, the majority Buddhist Sinhalese began discriminating against the Hindu Tamils, whom the British had favored.
Decades of civil war between the government and the Tamil Tigers ensued, with the latter aided covertly by India, until the rebellion was crushed in 2009.
In 2000, outside the rebel-controlled areas in the northeast, malaria cases began dropping as the government, with donor help, deployed a mix of indoor spraying, bed nets, rapid diagnostic kits and medicines that combined artemisinin, an effective treatment, with other drugs.
The government also screened blood samples drawn — for any reason — in public clinics and hospitals for malaria infection, and officials established a nationwide electronic case-reporting system.
In war-torn areas, the disease retreated more slowly, although the Tigers often cooperated with malaria-control teams because their villages and fighters also suffered.
Nonetheless, in a population of 20 million, it took years to get rid of the last few hundred annual cases. Most were soldiers and itinerant laborers, often from India, who worked in remote slash-and-burn farming areas and in logging and gem-mining camps.


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#9
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N.J. woman uses couponing to feed 30,000 people in need

When she first learned about couponing, her eyes lit up.
Not because of the potential deals on her groceries. For 29-year-old Lauren Puryear, she realized that couponing was the tool she'd been looking for to bring thousands of meals to people in need.
She has set a goal of delivering 30,000 meals to people who are food insecure by her 30th birthday.
Puryear, a Woodbridge resident who is a mental health clinician, has been spending years of her time helping to feed the hungry.
It all began four years ago after the death of her grandmother, who had strongly instilled the importance of helping others.
To continue her grandmother's legacy, in 2012, she started an organization, For The Love of Others, which aims to assist people of all backgrounds "through providing opportunities to enable them to live a purposeful life," according to its website.
Though she had been buying food in bulk from stores like Cosco and BJ's, or from online stores like eBay and Amazon, it wasn't enough. She wanted to reach more people.
So, when someone told her about couponing, she quickly realized she could use this old pastime to reach not hundreds, but tens of thousands of hungry people.
"I started couponing for food items like spaghetti, meatballs, and I was (often) able to get the items for free or for little to no money," she explained.
If done correctly, she said she can feed as many as 150 people on just $20, depending on the items.
"There are coupons in the Sunday paper, or online that you can print ... so I collect as many as I can, match them to the store and that is how I am able to get the items for free," she said.


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#10
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War Ends In Colombia

At  5 p.m. in the main rotunda of Cartagena’s Convention Center, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos and Rodrigo Londoño of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) will sign the Final Accord ending more than a half-century of conflict in this country and that claimed the lives of 260,000 people.
The ceremony will be attended by 15 presidents, 27 foreign ministers and 2,500 other guests, including 250 victims of the armed conflict. It is scheduled to last 70 minutes.
The United Nation’s Secretary General Ban-Ki Moon will deliver the opening speech, followed by FARC’s Rodrigo Londoño and President Juan Manuel Santos.
Santos at midday will attend mass at the church of San Pedro Claver in Cartagena’s old city. The religious service will be officiated by Pope Francis’s envoy, the Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Pietro Parolin. After the Catholic service, President Santos will host a private lunch at the presidential residence Casa de Huespedes.
As of Sunday morning, world leaders began arriving in Colombia’s colonial port city and expressed their support to Colombia’s peace process with FARC.
According to President of El Salvador, Salvador Sánchez, “Colombia is generating hope for the world.”

candleceremony-1068x712.jpg


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#11
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Measles officially wiped out across the Americas

Measles has been officially declared to have been eliminated from the Americas. The welcome joint announcement by both the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) still means that the virus exists in the wild in other parts of the globe, but it’s a testament to the unfathomable hard work of medical professionals and researchers that two entire continents are measles-free.
Most common among young children, measles causes cold-like symptoms, photosensitivity, fevers, and blotchy rashes. Make no mistake, though – this virus doesn’t just cause merely unpleasant bouts of illness. It can kill, and poorly nourished children in parts of Africa and Asia with weak immune systems are particularly vulnerable. Even if they don’t die, they can go blind.
After the success of eradicating smallpox from the planet, researchers quickly began to target measles (and rubella) for complete annihilation, among other diseases. In fact, measles is the fifth vaccine-preventable disease to be eliminated from the Americas, after smallpox (1971), polio (1994), rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (2015).
“This is a historic day for our region and indeed the world,” PAHO/WHO Director Carissa Etienne told a gathering of experts in Washington DC on September 27.

uPcnNbm.jpg


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#12
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I feel this should be "news, discussions, and media".

 

YLiwqRdedzdBUjuIcIncP9aCI8n2LJqSwoGuRFfw


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#13
Sciencerocks

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Measles officially wiped out across the Americas

Measles has been officially declared to have been eliminated from the Americas. The welcome joint announcement by both the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) still means that the virus exists in the wild in other parts of the globe, but it’s a testament to the unfathomable hard work of medical professionals and researchers that two entire continents are measles-free.
Most common among young children, measles causes cold-like symptoms, photosensitivity, fevers, and blotchy rashes. Make no mistake, though – this virus doesn’t just cause merely unpleasant bouts of illness. It can kill, and poorly nourished children in parts of Africa and Asia with weak immune systems are particularly vulnerable. Even if they don’t die, they can go blind.
After the success of eradicating smallpox from the planet, researchers quickly began to target measles (and rubella) for complete annihilation, among other diseases. In fact, measles is the fifth vaccine-preventable disease to be eliminated from the Americas, after smallpox (1971), polio (1994), rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (2015).
“This is a historic day for our region and indeed the world,” PAHO/WHO Director Carissa Etienne told a gathering of experts in Washington DC on September 27.

uPcnNbm.jpg

 

 

Thank you Vaccines...Awesome news.


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#14
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Nicki Minaj Quietly Kept Sending Funds To An Indian Village, Today It's Fully Developed

Rapper Nicki Minaj has surprised us by putting up a sweet Instagram post. The ‘Anaconda’ singer has been contributing funds to an Indian village since last few years. It’s due to her that a village in India (she did not reveal the name of the village) has a computer center, a tailoring institute, a reading program and two water wells!
"We complain about the most ridiculous little things when some (people) don't even have clean water. Blessings to India. Our work is far from done," Minaj captioned the Instagram video.  
Minaj said she would be dropping more details about her charity work in the "near future", in case fans want to get involved.


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#15
Ewolf20

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but this barely updates.



#16
Alislaws

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Yeah, thats how we know we are living in the darkest timeline. 


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#17
caltrek

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Oh, I don't know.  I think a lot of what I consider positive news ends up in the Space News and Discussion thread.  I continue to think we live in a very exciting time, if only because of the avalanche of discoveries regarding space that inundate us on an almost daily basis.

 

I think a part of the problem is what is regarded as news.  To cite a very well worn metaphor news is not about the 99 cats who did not get stuck in a tree today.  It is the cat the did get stuck that excites both our imagination and our compassion.  Of course, being buried in nothing but bad news day after day can take its toll.  So, it is not a bad idea to remind ourselves that there are also good things going on.

 

For those of us on the left, that is why I created the Future of Our Revolution thread.  To remind ourselves that victories are being won.  Of course, for those on the right, such victories are bad news. So, it is also in the very nature of political news that one reads current developments as either good or bad news.  It is usually the case that we come to the conclusion that it is very mixed in that regard.


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#18
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It barely updates because no one bothers to update it. If we wanted, it would have 20 pages by now. 

As I said in the first post, we care more about negative news than positive news. And we are apt to want to find the negative within positive news anyway.


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#19
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Chile Just Converted 11 Million Acres Into New National Parks

Chile set aside 11 million acres of land for national parks aided by the largest private land donation from a private entity to a country. The conservation effort of the Tompkins Foundation helped pave the way for Chile to greatly expand its conservation of the pristine Patagonia wilderness.
The Tompkins foundation was established by Kristine McDivitt Tompkins, the previous CEO of Patagonia, and the late Doug Tompkins, the co-founder of North Face and Esprit. The couple, known for purchasing large chunks of land in Patagonia for conservation, have always had the ambition to protect and conserve the Patagonian wilderness for generations to come.


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#20
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Microsoft is using its TV White Spaces tech in hurricane-hit Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands

TVWS can be used to create wireless broadband connections over great distances; Microsoft has used TVWS to deploy wireless broadband in many developing countries

TV White Spaces are unused blocks of spectrum located between the frequencies assigned to television stations. It can be used to created wireless broadband connections over great distances. Around the world, Microsoft has used TVWS to deploy wireless broadband in many developing countries.
Recently, they deployed this technology in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands which were hit by devastating hurricanes. Across these regions, there are still widespread power outages and nearly half of cell sites are still down. Microsoft is working with NetHope, government agencies, local Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and local TV broadcasters to provide wireless connection that will allow thousands of people in that area to communicate with others. In Utuado, this technology has been used to reestablish internet connectivity to a food distribution site, a health clinic and the University of Puerto Rico.


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