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Nanotechnology & Material Science News and Discussions

nanotechnology nano microtechnology micro material science metamaterials graphene atomic engineering molecular manufacturing nanobots

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#41
Logically Irrational

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Technology making a splash

http://www.guardian....h?newsfeed=true

Within the next 20 years, combining nanotechnology with devices that print in three dimensions could bring about a revolution in manufacturing. Instead of assembling electronic goods from many separate components, we might instead simply print a number of different products from a single material, or if the product was more complex, use different "cartridges" in the same way that colour printing is different from black and white. Looking even further into the future self-healing materials may one day be used in surgical implants, while advances in "quantum" computers could pave the way for artificial intelligence.

Because nanotechnology is so novel and so powerful, many people worry about its unknown risks and potential dangers.

"The risk most talked about is the ability of nanotech carbon tubes to potentially cause asbestosis-type illnesses," says Mike Childs, a spokesperson for Friends of the Earth. "There are concerns that the long-term effects of nanomaterials in the environment and in the human body have not been studied enough yet, and that perhaps we should be more cautious about adding them to consumer products."

Then there is the effect on the environment. Nanotechnology could both improve and worsen environmental problems.

"At the moment, the manufacture of nanoparticles is very energy intensive," says Childs. "But nanotech could make solar panels more efficient and could be vital in making step-changes in energy storage technologies."

Then there are concerns that sound more like a science-fiction film. Larry Millstein, president of the Foresight Institute, says: "Self-replication has given rise to many interesting and imaginative scenarios, some of which are alarming." These scenarios include a swarm of all-consuming, self-replicating nanorobots. However, Millstein emphasises that these machines do not currently exist and that the fear is not of nanotechnology itself, but of its potential to enable the construction of such "nanobots".


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#42
Raklian

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New Method for Continuous Production of Carbon Nanotubes

A group of researchers from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) have successfully created a new method for producing carbon nanotubes. The new method is capable of reducing the price of carbon nanotubes from $100 - $700 US to just $15 to $35 US for each gram, much lower than world market prices.


http://www.scienceda...20412105109.htm



The realization of the space elevator draws ever closer. Just a few more breakthroughs like this before we're all set. :biggrin:
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What are you without the sum of your parts?

#43
Craven

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Cool. I wonder how good we are at connecting them. Some space elevator calculations are treating string as single molecule, but to make space elevator wire we'll need to connect short nanotubes somehow.
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#44
Logically Irrational

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Nanotechnology cuts water use, energy costs

http://www.nanowerk....ewsid=24899.php

Nuclear and coal power plants are some of the thirstiest machines on earth. The turbines that spin inside of them to generate electricity require tons and tons of steam, and all of that water has to come from somewhere.

Recent studies have estimated that roughly two-fifths of the nation's freshwater withdrawals and three percent of overall freshwater consumption goes to supplying the steam generators at large power stations in the United States. In order to cut down on the enormous quantities of water required to operate these plants, scientists have begun to look for new technologies that could improve their efficiency and reduce the demand for water.

As part of a larger consortium involving partners from several energy companies, universities, and government agencies, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory are developing a special class of nanoparticles that partially melt as steam evaporates from a plant's cooling towers, absorbing a significant percentage of the diffused heat in the system.

In order to operate, electrical plants use a cycle that uses partially condensed high-temperature steam to turn a large turbine. During generation, a significant quantity of this steam is lost due to evaporation. "In every cycle, there's a significant amount of water that we can't recapture," said Argonne materials scientist Dileep Singh, who is working to develop the specialized nanoparticles.

The nanoparticles are based on what is known as a "core-shell" configuration, in which a solid outer coat protects an inner layer that can melt above a certain temperature. Once dispersed in the plant's water supply, the nanoparticles are able to absorb heat during the thermal cycle. After partially melting, the particles travel to the cooling tower where they resolidify. The system is closed and designed to ensure against leakage of the plant's water or steam into the environment.


Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn!

#45
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Self-Assembling Highly Conductive Plastic Nanofibers

Researchers have succeeded in making highly conductive plastic fibers that are only several nanometers thick. These nanowires “self-assemble” when triggered by a flash of light.

http://www.scienceda...20422134849.htm

#46
Logically Irrational

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Nanotechnology dental fillings that kill bacteria and re-mineralize the tooth

http://www.nanowerk....ewsid=25089.php

Scientists using nanotechology at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry have created the first cavity-filling composite that kills harmful bacteria and regenerates tooth structure lost to bacterial decay.

Rather than just limiting decay with conventional fillings, the new composite is a revolutionary dental weapon to control harmful bacteria, which co-exist in the natural colony of microorganisms in the mouth, says professor Huakun (Hockin) Xu, PhD, MS.

"Tooth decay means that the mineral content in the tooth has been dissolved by the organic acids secreted by bacteria residing in biofilms or plaques on the tooth surface. These organisms convert carbohydrates to acids that decrease the minerals in the tooth structure," says Xu, director of the Division of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering in the School's Department of Endodontics, Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry.

After a dentist drills out a decayed tooth, the cavity still contains residual bacteria. Xu says it is not possible for a dentist to remove all the damaged tissue, so it's important to neutralize the harmful effects of the bacteria, which is just what the new nanocomposites are able to do.


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Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn!

#47
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http://neverwet.com/applications.php
A company called neverwet claims that by the middle of this year (was postponed, as it was supposed to be released by the bigeninng of 2012), they will release a nano fabric spray for the general public.

"Please note that our NeverWet products are NOT available for Consumers as a Retail product at this time. We expect to have retail spray can products available by mid 2012."


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Hey.  Stop reading.  The post is over.


#48
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This looks great ! even if the video editing is really bad. I hope we can buy the spray soon, I'd love to protect my shoes from getting wet.

#49
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New nanostructure for batteries keeps going and going

May 11, 2012 By Mike Ross

For more than a decade, scientists have tried to improve lithium-based batteries by replacing the graphite in one terminal with silicon, which can store 10 times more charge. But after just a few charge/discharge cycles, the silicon structure would crack and crumble, rendering the battery useless.

Now a team led by materials scientist Yi Cui of Stanford and SLAC has found a solution: a cleverly designed double-walled nanostructure that lasts more than 6,000 cycles, far more than needed by electric vehicles or mobile electronics.

“This is a very exciting development toward our goal of creating smaller, lighter and longer-lasting batteries than are available today,” Cui said. The results were published March 25 in Nature Nanotechnology.

http://phys.org/news...-batteries.html

#50
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Since Carbon nanotubes are 1000 times stronger than steel, imagine how strong they could be as artificial muscles! Super-strength will be a reality!

#51
tornado64

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This never wet spray is really impressive. Seems we are not so far from self cleaning clothes you never have to wash.

Edited by tornado64, 12 May 2012 - 01:25 PM.


#52
Septentrion

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Some eco-terrorist seem to hate this nanotechnology stuff. They claim science as the tool of capitalist, and therefor is completely evil. http://richarddawkin...to-strike-again Complete story: http://www.newscient...rike-again.html

Because it's no longer 2015


#53
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Nanotechnology Breakthrough Could Dramatically Improve Medical Tests

ScienceDaily (May 31, 2012) — A laboratory test used to detect disease and perform biological research could be made more than 3 million times more sensitive, according to researchers who combined standard biological tools with a breakthrough in nanotechnology.

The increased performance could greatly improve the early detection of cancer, Alzheimer's disease and other disorders by allowing doctors to detect far lower concentrations of telltale markers than was previously practical.

http://www.scienceda...20531165752.htm


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#54
Zeitgeist123

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neverwet is not really feasible in temperate climates, you want clothes not just because it protects you, but also it absorbs sweat. which is also the reason why people prefer cotton than polyester.

“Philosophy is a pretty toy if one indulges in it with moderation at the right time of life. But if one pursues it further than one should, it is absolute ruin." - Callicles to Socrates


#55
Logically Irrational

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Researchers use nanotechnology to harness power of fireflies

http://phys.org/news...-fireflies.html

What do fireflies, nanorods and Christmas lights have in common? Someday, consumers may be able to purchase multicolor strings of light that don't need electricity or batteries to glow. Scientists in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences found a new way to harness the natural light produced by fireflies (called bioluminescence) using nanoscience. Their breakthrough produces a system that is 20 to 30 times more efficient than those produced during previous experiments.

It's all about the size and structure of the custom, quantum nanorods, which are produced in the laboratory by Mathew Maye, assistant professor of chemistry in SU's College of Arts and Sciences; and Rabeka Alam, a chemistry Ph.D. candidate. Maye is also a member of the Syracuse Biomaterials Institute.

"Firefly light is one of nature's best examples of bioluminescence," Maye says. "The light is extremely bright and efficient. We've found a new way to harness biology for nonbiological applications by manipulating the interface between the biological and nonbiological components."

Their work, "Designing Quantum Rods for Optimized Energy Transfer with Firefly Luciferase Enzymes," was published online May 23 in Nano Letters and is forthcoming in print. Collaborating on the research were Professor Bruce Branchini and Danielle Fontaine, both from Connecticut College.


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#56
kjaggard

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here's something cool. I would summarize it before posting the link, but I don't quite understand it lol http://www.nature.co...ature10500.html


The basic gist as I see it is they've made molecular tiles that form in a pattern and assemble a negative 'mold' of themselves which replicate the negative itself thus a copy of the orginal pattern. If you pair them side by side and called them a single unit you'd get a self replication unit. each side duplicating the other.

When I think about first generation assemblers I think along these lines, because one of the hard things to do is get a carbon based device to assemble carbon atoms because the carbon and carbon tend to bond and interfere with each other. But a silicon system might work for carbon, and a carbon system might work for silicon. Starting from that base pairing I can see designing an assembler 'worm' that is made of carbon by the same method they use to make race cars and stuff. Then use the worm to build a silicon twin for building carbon objects.

Then put them together and you can start building pairs of them, then clusters of them and then sheets of them. and eventually you will be able to build any mechanical or solid objects with carbon, silicon, or circuts of silicon and carbon materials. That could be a good first generation as it could meet a lot of physical and industrial needs. Like making those carbon nanotube ribbons for the space elevators.

They would also allow for being able to build second generation assemblers out of carbon/silicon that can work with a wider source of materials and build the second generation sheets that could fabricate things like medicines and more complicated mechanical and electronic components.

From that point on it's just designs as fast as we can figure them out. That's why I think after the first assembler capable of building a better assembler is the point where singularity takes off. Litterally if we build a unit that can build a unit that can make anything from any combinations of atoms it would be: Day one first unit, day two second unit, day three mass produced unit that could build anything from atoms up. Day four fastest most efficient computer core ever made crunches numbers on all potential design and allows real time simulation, day five fabrication of devices that build food and water supplies supplied to all the world, day six tricorders and injectable nanomedical devices see an end to bacterial, viral and cancerous disease, day seven the first molecularly build space station begins construction in orbit where it will function as the assembly platform for exploratory, generation and colony ships.
Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
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#57
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World Record: Lightest Material in the World Produced

ScienceDaily (July 17, 2012) — A network of porous carbon tubes that is three-dimensionally interwoven at nano and micro level -- this is the lightest material in the world. It weights only 0.2 milligrams per cubic centimetre, and is therefore 75 times lighter than Styrofoam, but it is very strong nevertheless. Scientists of Kiel University (KU) and Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) have named their joint creation "Aerographite."

http://www.scienceda...20717084831.htm


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#58
Logically Irrational

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Nanorobot takes on hepatitis C virus, wins

http://www.gizmag.co...-florida/23379/

A new scientific breakthrough points to a new way of treating the Hepatitis C virus, which infects 170 million people worldwide. Researchers at the University of Florida have created nanorobots that can attack the very mechanism of viral replication. It acts on a cellular level as a tiny particle destroys the mechanism that reproduces the proteins related to the disease.

The virus is destroyed by a particle called a nanozyme, the surface of which is made up of two main biological components. The first is an enzyme that destroys mRNA, the carrier of the genetic recipe of the disease-related protein. The other part is the intelligence of the system, a DNA oligonucleotide that identifies the material and instructs the enzyme to destroy the carrier of the protein code.

The main current treatment option for sufferers of hepatitis C, which can lead to scarring and cirrhosis of the liver and for which no vaccine is yet available, involves a grueling 48-week regime of Interferon and Ribavirin, with success rate of just below 50 percent. The combination therapy can cause debilitating side effects in patients, and some even have to quit treatment due to anemia, depression and and extreme fatigue. The nanotherapy also tackles the side effect issue: because it does not trigger the body’s defense mechanisms, the possibility of adverse reactions is greatly reduced.

But it’s not only hepatitis C that can be treated with nanotherapy. Lead researcher Dr. Chen Liu said the new technology can have broad application because it can target any gene researchers want, such as cancer and other viral infections. “This opens the door to new fields so we can test many other things. We’re excited about it,” Liu said.

Nanoparticle technologies are already being used in medical treatments, especially in genetic testing and to help determine genetic markers of diseases. The researchers say they could hail a new age in medicine because nanorobots can enter diseased cells only, targeting only the specified disease process but leaving healthy cells unharmed. What’s more, therapies could be delivered in pill form. In the case of this particular nanoparticle, further safety testing is needed.


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Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn!

#59
kjaggard

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sweet! I'm a bit perturbed by the targeting sections of viruses for destruction, because viruses have a lot in common with our RNA and organelles in our cells. There would be definate risks in setting these things loose and not be able to distinguish one thing from another. You might need to target them as sort of biometric keys that Identify based on four or six points of reference and then activate the destructomatic part.
Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#60
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http://www.kurzweila...d-human-tissues Harvard scientists have created a type of “cyborg” tissue for the first time by embedding a three-dimensional network of functional, biocompatible, nanoscale wires into engineered human tissues. yowza.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nanotechnology, nano, microtechnology, micro, material science, metamaterials, graphene, atomic engineering, molecular manufacturing, nanobots

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