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Nanotechnology & Material Science News and Discussions

nanotechnology nano microtechnology micro material science metamaterials graphene atomic engineering molecular manufacturing nanobots

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#581
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Fluorine grants white graphene new powers

"A little fluorine turns an insulating ceramic known as white graphene into a wide-bandgap semiconductor with magnetic properties."

A little fluorine turns an insulating ceramic known as white graphene into a wide-bandgap semiconductor with magnetic properties. Rice University scientists said that could make the unique material suitable for electronics in extreme environments.
A proof-of-concept paper from Rice researchers demonstrates a way to turn two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) – aka white graphene – from an insulator to a semiconductor. The magnetism, they said, is an unexpected bonus.
Because the atomically thin material is an exceptional conductor of heat, the researchers suggested it may be useful for electronics in high-temperature applications, perhaps even as magnetic memory devices.
The discovery appears this week in Science Advances.


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#582
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Lab develops way to spot defects inside hard-to-image materials
July 17, 2017

It's hard to get an X-ray image of low-density material like tissue between bones because X-rays just pass right through like sunlight through a window. But what if you need to see the area that isn't bone?

 

https://phys.org/new...-materials.html


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#583
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Carbon nanotubes turn electrical current into light-matter quasi-particles
July 18, 2017

Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University (Germany) and the University of St Andrews (Scotland) have demonstrated electrical generation of hybrid light-matter particles, so-called exciton-polaritons, by using field-effect transistors with semiconducting carbon nanotubes integrated in optical micro-cavities.

 

https://phys.org/new...ght-matter.html


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#584
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Eric Drexler’s Vision of Nanotechology is Making a Comeback

The dream of atomically precise manufacturing that Dr. Eric Drexler laid out in his groundbreaking 1986 book, “Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology” hit a major roadblock in its quest for public acceptance in the early 2000s after criticism of the potential risks associated with it by Sun Microsystems co-founder, Bill Joy and an ill-founded critique of its feasibility by the Nobel-winning chemist, Prof. Richard Smalley.
Bill Joy argued in his widely read Wired article, “Why the Future Doesn’t Need Us”, that the technologies that could lead us to a technological singularity –namely, genetics, robotics and nanotechnology– would eventually become so powerful that they would no longer be safely manageable by humanity and would pose a grave existential threat to all life on Earth. Self-replicating nanobots, Joy said, were so dangerous that all research into them should be halted.
Of course a consequence of halting all research into nanotechnology –if such a thing were even possible– would be that research would be forced underground and those who would benefit as a result would be criminal and extremist groups that seek to cause harm. Halting research would also prevent well-meaning scientists from understanding and developing safety measures against the potential risks. Joy’s proscriptions would almost certainly cause more harm than they would prevent.


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#585
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Researchers find path to discovering new topological materials
July 19, 2017

An international team of researchers has found a way to determine whether a crystal is a topological insulator—and to predict crystal structures and chemical compositions in which new ones can arise. The results, published July 20 in the journal Nature, show that topological insulators are much more common in nature than currently believed.

 

https://phys.org/new...-materials.html


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#586
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Researchers Create Soft, Flexible Material That’s 5 Times Stronger Than Steel

 

Tough hydrogels have shown strong potential as structural biomaterials. These hydrogels alone, however, possess limited mechanical properties (such as low modulus) when compared to some load-bearing tissues, e.g., ligaments and tendons. Developing both strong and tough soft materials is still a challenge. To overcome this obstacle, a new material design strategy has been recently introduced by combining tough hydrogels with woven fiber fabric to create fiber reinforced soft composites (FRSCs). The new FRSCs exhibit extremely high toughness and tensile properties, far superior to those of the neat components, indicating a synergistic effect. [...]

This work provides a good guide toward the universal design of soft composites with extraordinary fracture resistance capacity.


Playing God is actually the highest expression of human nature. The urges to improve ourselves, to master our environment, [...] have been the fundamental driving forces of all of human history. Without these urges to ‘play God’, the world as we know it wouldn’t exist today.” - Ramez Naam


#587
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First controlled vertical manipulation of a single H atom with AFM tip

Due to the continuous improvement of scanning probe microscopy techniques, the long thought inaccessible goal of inducing and visualizing chemical reactions at the atomic scale is now routinely achievable by many groups around the world. In the framework of so-called mechanochemistry...

z0H2rGc.jpg


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#588
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Carbon Superconductivity raised from 11 kelvin up to 57 kelvin
brian wang | July 25, 2017 |

Researchers at North Carolina State University have significantly increased the temperature at which carbon-based materials act as superconductors, using a novel, boron-doped Q-carbon material.

The previous record for superconductivity in boron-doped diamond was 11 Kelvin, or minus 439.60 degrees Fahrenheit. The boron-doped Q-carbon has been found to be superconductive from 37K to 57K, which is minus 356.80 degrees F.

“Going from 11K to 57K is a big jump for conventional BCS superconductivity,” says Jay Narayan, the John C. Fan Distinguished Chair Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at NC State and senior author of two papers describing the work. BCS refers to the Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity.

 

https://www.nextbigf...-57-kelvin.html


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#589
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Research shows reusable, carbon nanotube-reinforced filters clean toxic heavy metals from water
July 27, 2017
Heavy metals in water meet their match
Plain quartz fiber, top, gains the ability to remove toxic metals from water when carbon nanotubes are added, bottom. The filters absorbed more than 99 percent of metals from test samples laden with cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, nickel …more

Carbon nanotubes immobilized in a tuft of quartz fiber have the power to remove toxic heavy metals from water, according to researchers at Rice University.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...-toxic.html#jCp


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Physicists turn a crystal into an electrical circuit
July 27, 2017

Washington State University physicists have found a way to write an electrical circuit into a crystal, opening up the possibility of transparent, three-dimensional electronics that, like an Etch A Sketch, can be erased and reconfigured.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...ircuit.html#jCp


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#591
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New nano carbon filter removes 99% of heavy metals from contaminated water

One gram of the material is enough to filter 83,000 liters of water to World Health Organization standards

A chemist from Rice University and a high school student have developed a filter that can remove toxic heavy metals from the water. The researchers calculated that one gram of the material could get 83,000 liters of water to World Health Organization standards. The filter can be washed with household vinegar and reused.


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#592
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#593
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This video is why I believe we will definitely have age reversal by the 2030's because if all else fails with Aubrey, Church, Sinclair

and all the rest with their bio medical approaches then a purely mechanical solution to reversing ageing will come to pass with

nano robots which would also be a cure all for everything.

No matter what the disease, cancer. pathogen it would simply and mechanically shred the offending biological problem.

 

The only thing I still don't understand with nano factories is although I believe the timescale he gave of 15 years seems feasible

for the device itself won't creating atomic blueprints for objects be another titanic breakthrough unto itself?

 

If you wanted to make an atomic copy of a priceless Ming vase how do we go about scanning the atomic structure of that object

for some sort of blueprint and wouldn't those same atomic blueprints be mindbogglingly huge data sets?

Still something I'm yet to hear any nano scientist address as yet.


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#594
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This video is why I believe we will definitely have age reversal by the 2030's because if all else fails with Aubrey, Church, Sinclair

and all the rest with their bio medical approaches then a purely mechanical solution to reversing ageing will come to pass with

nano robots which would also be a cure all for everything.

No matter what the disease, cancer. pathogen it would simply and mechanically shred the offending biological problem.

 

 

But then there's the danger of nanobots becoming the new pathogen of the 22nd century...

 

We'll call them.... the rogue bot syndrome.


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#595
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'Nanomedicine': Potentially revolutionary class of drugs are made-in-Canada

It's rare for researchers to discover a new class of drugs, but a University of Calgary microbiology professor recently did so -- by accident – and now hopes to revolutionize autoimmune disease treatment.
In 2004, Dr. Pere Santamaria and his research lab team at the Cumming School of Medicine conducted an experiment to image a mouse pancreas, using nanoparticles coated in pancreatic proteins.
 
The work didn’t go as planned.
“Our experiment was a complete failure,” he recently told CTV Calgary. “We were actually quite depressed, frustrated about the outcome of that.”
But the team was surprised to discover the nanoparticles had a major effect on the mice: resetting their immune systems.
The team realized that, by using nanoparticles, they can deliver disease-specific proteins to white blood cells, which will then go on to reprogram the cells to actively suppress the disease.


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#596
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Creating nearly perfect meter sized graphene one hundred times faster

Researchers have achieved a leap forward in graphene production, from a technique that synthesizes a few square centimeters of single-crystal graphene in a couple of hours, to an optimized method that allows the creation of an almost-perfect (over 99.9 percent aligned) 5 × 50 cm2 single-crystal graphene in just 20 minutes.
 
The low production costs, comparable to commercially available lower quality polycrystalline graphene films, could expand its usability. The method is expected to stimulate further fundamental work on graphene and related materials, including large scale folding of graphene sheets, similar to paper, creating origami-like or kirigami-like shapes, which could be applied to future flexible circuits.


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#597
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Creating nearly perfect meter sized graphene one hundred times faster

Researchers have achieved a leap forward in graphene production, from a technique that synthesizes a few square centimeters of single-crystal graphene in a couple of hours, to an optimized method that allows the creation of an almost-perfect (over 99.9 percent aligned) 5 × 50 cm2 single-crystal graphene in just 20 minutes.
 
The low production costs, comparable to commercially available lower quality polycrystalline graphene films, could expand its usability. The method is expected to stimulate further fundamental work on graphene and related materials, including large scale folding of graphene sheets, similar to paper, creating origami-like or kirigami-like shapes, which could be applied to future flexible circuits.

 

 

Growth in this area will be exponential. I won't be surprised by the end of the decade we'll be able to produce at least 100 feet of pure graphene in the same length of time.


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#598
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Growing Nearly Perfect Graphene At Scale

Korean and Chinese scientists have devised an inexpensive technique to grow large graphene sheets using Using copper foils as a substrate for carbon deposition

A team of scientists from Korea and China have developed a method to synthesize large sheets of monolayer single-crystal graphene. They report their findings in the journal Science Bulletin. Boasting high conductivity, strength and flexibility, graphene was proposed as one of the most likely substitutes for silicon and other materials. Polycrystalline graphene is formed by randomly oriented graphene islands, which decrease its quality. On the other hand, a honeycomb-shaped monolayer of carbon atoms, uniform throughout the whole material, offers exceptional properties to single-crystal graphene. Currently, scientists can grow meter-sized polycrystalline graphene and smaller single-crystal graphene, ranging from 0.01 mm2 to a few square centimeters. The synthesis of large single-crystal graphene at a low cost has been considered a critical goal of graphene synthesis.


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#599
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#600
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In a major medical breakthrough, a penny-sized nanochip pad is able to regrow organs and heal injuries by causing stem cells of any desired type to grow

Scientists have hailed a “breakthrough” technology capable of regrowing damaged organs and healing serious wounds with the single touch of a penny-sized pad.
The new device uses nanochips to reprogramme skin cells which then generate any type of cell necessary for medical treatment.
The non-invasive procedure takes less than a second and in laboratory trials was found to restore the function of badly damaged blood vessels within days.

 
alpha69

Big claims need backup. This was published in a very respected journal.https://www.nature.c...o.2017.134.html
More details here http://www.genengnew...-cell-type/6115


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nanotechnology, nano, microtechnology, micro, material science, metamaterials, graphene, atomic engineering, molecular manufacturing, nanobots

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