Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

These ads will disappear if you register on the forum

Photo

Nanotechnology & Material Science News and Discussions

nanotechnology nano microtechnology micro material science metamaterials graphene atomic engineering molecular manufacturing nanobots

  • Please log in to reply
703 replies to this topic

#621
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,569 posts

Scientists computationally design new metastable, ultra-light crystalline form of aluminum
brian wang | September 22, 2017 |

 

If you restructure aluminum at the molecular level, as Boldyrev and colleagues did using computational modeling, you could produce an ultra-light crystalline form of aluminum that’s lighter than water. Boldyrev, along with scientists Iliya Getmanskii, Vitaliy Koval, Rusian Minyaev and Vladimir Minkin of Southern Federal University in Rostov-on Don, Russia.

Above there is an image from Chemists from Utah State University, USA and Southern Federal University, Russia, showing computationally designed a new, metastable, ultra-light crystalline form of aluminum. Credit: Iliya Getmanskii, Southern Federal University, Russia

“My colleagues’ approach to this challenge was very innovative,” says Boldyrev, professor in USU’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. “They started with a known crystal lattice, in this case, a diamond, and substituted every carbon atom with an aluminum tetrahedron.”

The team’s calculations confirmed such a structure is a new, metastable, lightweight form of crystal aluminum. And to their amazement, it has a density of only 0.61 gram per cubic centimeter, in contrast to convention aluminum’s density of 2.7 grams per cubic centimeter.

“That means the new crystallized form will float on water, which has a density of one gram per cubic centimeter,” Boldyrev says.

Such a property opens a whole new realm of possible applications for the non-magnetic, corrosive-resistant, abundant, relatively inexpensive and easy-to-produce metal

https://www.nextbigf...f-aluminum.html



#622
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,979 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

The World’s 1st Molecular Robot Has Just Been Created by UK Scientists

Now, a team at the University of Manchester in the UK has reached another milestone. They’ve developed a robot so small, it operates on the molecular level. This, the world’s first molecular robot has an arm which can manipulate individual molecules or move them in clusters.
The thing is a millionth of a millimeter in size. To give you an idea of the scale we’re talking about, one quintillion (a billion billion) of them piled together would be about equal to a few grains of salt. Each machine is comprised of 150 atoms. That includes carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atoms. Though small, these machines could offer us incredible capabilities, such as to work in tiny, molecular factories, in order to manufacture the next generation of materials and products.

To put that into even better perspective, that's a nanometer in size. I mean, Christ! Just say it!


  • Casey likes this

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#623
superexistence

superexistence

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 273 posts

Drexler was right!



#624
Raklian

Raklian

    An Immortal In The Making

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,716 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Drexler was right!

 

Well, it was obvious to him from the very beginning. At least that's how it is like to geniuses who appeared way before their time. No, no... no such thing as appearing before one's time because that would mean nothing would get invented.

 

This also affirms what Ray Kurzweil has been saying all along - nanobots will keep us healthy and achieve infinite lifespans. This is merely the first step towards that eventuality.

 

I also suspect this is how the space elevator with the required specific strength for its tether will get build.

 

And don't forget the molecular replicator! We won't need farms to grow food... heck we won't even have to grow it at all. Food just gets "built" and served on a very nice silver platter.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#625
Raklian

Raklian

    An Immortal In The Making

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,716 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

 

The World’s 1st Molecular Robot Has Just Been Created by UK Scientists

To put that into even better perspective, that's a nanometer in size. I mean, Christ! Just say it!

 

 

 


 

The thing is a millionth of a millimeter in size. To give you an idea of the scale we’re talking about, one quintillion (a billion billion) of them piled together would be about equal to a few grains of salt.

 

 

LOL, I was reading a comment section in another site about this news - someone boldly declared "My waifu is coming!" I guess it's the meme among the desperate and hopefuls.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#626
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,569 posts

A novel textile material that keeps itself germ-free
October 5, 2017

 

Scientists have developed a novel weapon in the battle against deadly hospital-acquired infections - a textile that disinfects itself.

And independent tests show it can reduce bacteria levels by more than 90 per cent.

By incorporating the specially-engineered textile in a device designed to be used on hospital doors instead of the traditional aluminium door plate, that part of the door that people push to open it - they aim to bolster hand hygiene.

The self-disinfecting device - known as Surfaceskins - has been developed by a spin out company from the University of Leeds and is the culmination of seven years research and development.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...m-free.html#jCp



#627
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,979 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

There's a New Quantum Material That Mimics Human Brains in an Unexpected Way

“[It] could represent the future of artificial intelligence – not because it retains vast amounts of data, but precisely because it doesn't.”

Scientists have discovered a quantum material that could represent the future of artificial intelligence – not because it retains vast amounts of data, but precisely because it doesn't.
The human brain is often singled out as being the most complex and powerful computer that scientists know of, and one of the mechanisms that enables this complexity is our ability to forget things – a phenomenon that can be mimicked in a material called samarium nickelate.
"The brain has limited capacity, and it can only function efficiently because it is able to forget," says one of the researchers, nanoscientist Subramanian Sankaranarayanan from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).


  • eacao, Maximus and Jakob like this

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#628
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,569 posts

Researchers offer insights into lightweight material that expands with heat
October 16, 2017 by Ali Sundermier

 

When it comes to taking up room without adding too much weight, the bubble can't be beat. Because they are mostly air, they're ultra-lightweight and can expand to fill any given space.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...terial.html#jCp



#629
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,569 posts

Scientists Have Made a Two-Dimensional Material That's Never Been Seen in Nature
 

    A team of researchers from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia has reportedly made a 'once-in-a-decade discovery' that will radically change how we do chemistry.

    The discovery? The creation of two-dimensional materials no thicker than a few atoms — something that's never been seen before in nature.

    The research that led to this incredible find was led by Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh and Torben Daeneke from RMIT's School of Engineering. Alongside their students, they worked on the material's development for over a year.

    "When you write with a pencil, the graphite leaves very thin flakes called graphene, that can be easily extracted because they are naturally occurring layered structures," explains Daeneke.

    "But what happens if these materials don't exist naturally? Here we found an extraordinary, yet very simple method to create atomically thin flakes of materials that don't naturally exist as layered structures."

    While the new material is expected to be a new tool in chemistry, it also promises to improve our existing electronics. In fact, it's believed it could enhance data storage capabilities and make electronics faster.

 

 

https://www.sciencea...ne-2017-october



#630
Jakob

Jakob

    Russian Bot

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,815 posts

 

There's a New Quantum Material That Mimics Human Brains in an Unexpected Way

“[It] could represent the future of artificial intelligence – not because it retains vast amounts of data, but precisely because it doesn't.”

Scientists have discovered a quantum material that could represent the future of artificial intelligence – not because it retains vast amounts of data, but precisely because it doesn't.
The human brain is often singled out as being the most complex and powerful computer that scientists know of, and one of the mechanisms that enables this complexity is our ability to forget things – a phenomenon that can be mimicked in a material called samarium nickelate.
"The brain has limited capacity, and it can only function efficiently because it is able to forget," says one of the researchers, nanoscientist Subramanian Sankaranarayanan from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

 

wtf...

 

Only in 2017 I guess.



#631
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,569 posts

New graphene nano-ribbons lend sensors unprecedented sensitivity
October 20, 2017 by Scott Schrage

 

Pinning DNA-sized ribbons of carbon to a gas sensor can boost its sensitivity far better than any other known carbon material, says a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...tivity.html#jCp



#632
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,569 posts

Control of electrons in Graphene could lead to novel electronic devices
brian wang | October 24, 2017 |
Save

 

Scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick have learned how to tame the unruly electrons in graphene, paving the way for the ultra-fast transport of electrons with low loss of energy in novel systems.

Above – A sharp tip creates a force field that can trap electrons in graphene or modify their trajectories, similar to the effect a lens has on light rays. Yuhang Jiang/Rutgers University-New Brunswick

“This shows we can electrically control the electrons in graphene,” said Eva Y. Andrei, Board of Governors professor in Rutgers’ Department of Physics and Astronomy in the School of Arts and Sciences and the study’s senior author. “In the past, we couldn’t do it. This is the reason people thought that one could not make devices like transistors that require switching with graphene, because their electrons run wild.”

 

https://www.nextbigf...ic-devices.html



#633
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,569 posts

New research could revolutionise the future of electronic devices
November 28, 2017

 

Research led by the Universities of St Andrews and Tokyo reveals a new understanding on how to create topological electronic states in solids which could fuel the development of improved materials for fast and energy-efficient electronic devices. The findings could lead to new types of computer chips that could be much more powerful than those found in today's computers and smart phones.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...evices.html#jCp



#634
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,979 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

Uranium Breakthrough May Pave the Way for Entirely New Materials

IN BRIEF
Uranium has largely been relegated to nuclear energy and weapons development, but researchers from the University of Manchester think it could do so much more. The scientists discovered that it's capable of new unprecedented reactions.
AN UNEXPECTED FIND
Researchers working at the University of Manchester in the U.K. have discovered that uranium can perform reactions that can offer novel solutions to today’s energy and waste problems, as well as possibilities in drug development. The team, led by professor Steve Liddle, head of Inorganic Chemistry at Manchester, detailed their breakthrough discovery in the journal Nature Communications.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#635
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,569 posts

Chemists synthesize narrow ribbons of graphene using only light and heat
December 8, 2017 by Katherine Kornei

 

Silicon—the shiny, brittle metal commonly used to make semiconductors—is an essential ingredient of modern-day electronics. But as electronic devices have become smaller and smaller, creating tiny silicon components that fit inside them has become more challenging and more expensive.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...aphene.html#jCp



#636
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,569 posts

New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflective
December 13, 2017

 

Researchers have demonstrated prototype windows that switch from reflective to clear with the simple addition of a liquid. The new switchable windows are easy to manufacture and could one day keep parked cars cool in the sun or make office buildings more energy efficient. The technology can also be used to make roof panels that keep houses cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

Although glass that uses an applied voltage to switch from clear to an opaque or tinted state is commercially available, its high cost— around $100 per square foot—has hindered widespread use.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...liquid.html#jCp



#637
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,569 posts

Two-Layer Graphene becomes a Diamond-Hard Material on Impact which could make super armor
brian wang | December 21, 2017

Save

 

Scientists at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at the Graduate Center, CUNY, worked to theorize and test how two layers of graphene — each one-atom thick — could be made to transform into a diamond-like material upon impact at room temperature. The team also found the moment of conversion resulted in a sudden reduction of electric current, suggesting diamene could have interesting electronic and spintronic properties. The new findings will likely have applications in developing wear-resistant protective coatings and ultra-light bullet-proof films.

Above – By applying pressure at the nanoscale with an indenter to two layers of graphene, each one-atom thick, CUNY researchers transformed the honeycombed graphene into a diamond-like material at room temperature. Photo credit: Ella Maru Studio

“This is the thinnest film with the stiffness and hardness of diamond ever created,” said Elisa Riedo, professor of physics at the ASRC and the project’s lead researcher. “Previously, when we tested graphite or a single atomic layer of graphene, we would apply pressure and feel a very soft film. But when the graphite film was exactly two-layers thick, all of a sudden we realized that the material under pressure was becoming extremely hard and as stiff, or stiffer, than bulk diamond.”

 

https://www.nextbigf...uper-armor.html


  • eacao and Yuli Ban like this

#638
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,979 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

How a Machine That Can Make Anything Would Change Everything

Something is going to happen in the next forty years that will change things, probably more than anything else since we left the caves.” –James Burke
James Burke has a vision for the future. He believes that by the middle of this century, perhaps as early as 2042, our world will be defined by a new device: the nanofabricator.
These tiny factories will be large at first, like early computers, but soon enough you’ll be able to buy one that can fit on a desk. You’ll pour in some raw materials—perhaps water, air, dirt, and a few powders of rare elements if required—and the nanofabricator will go to work. Powered by flexible photovoltaic panels that coat your house, it will tear apart the molecules of the raw materials, manipulating them on the atomic level to create…anything you like. Food. A new laptop. A copy of Kate Bush’s debut album, The Kick Inside. Anything, providing you can give it both the raw materials and the blueprint for creation.
It sounds like science fiction—although, with the advent of 3D printers in recent years, less so than it used to. Burke, who hosted the BBC show Tomorrow’s World, which introduced bemused and excited audiences to all kinds of technologies, has a decades-long track record of technological predictions. He isn’t alone in envisioning the nanofactory as the technology that will change the world forever. Eric Drexler, thought by many to be the father of nanotechnology, wrote in the 1990s about molecular assemblers, hypothetical machines capable of manipulating matter and constructing molecules on the nano level, with scales of a billionth of a meter.


  • Maximus likes this

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#639
Singularity Kills

Singularity Kills

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts

How a Machine That Can Make Anything Would Change Everything

Something is going to happen in the next forty years that will change things, probably more than anything else since we left the caves.” –James Burke
James Burke has a vision for the future. He believes that by the middle of this century, perhaps as early as 2042, our world will be defined by a new device: the nanofabricator.
These tiny factories will be large at first, like early computers, but soon enough you’ll be able to buy one that can fit on a desk. You’ll pour in some raw materials—perhaps water, air, dirt, and a few powders of rare elements if required—and the nanofabricator will go to work. Powered by flexible photovoltaic panels that coat your house, it will tear apart the molecules of the raw materials, manipulating them on the atomic level to create…anything you like. Food. A new laptop. A copy of Kate Bush’s debut album, The Kick Inside. Anything, providing you can give it both the raw materials and the blueprint for creation.
It sounds like science fiction—although, with the advent of 3D printers in recent years, less so than it used to. Burke, who hosted the BBC show Tomorrow’s World, which introduced bemused and excited audiences to all kinds of technologies, has a decades-long track record of technological predictions. He isn’t alone in envisioning the nanofactory as the technology that will change the world forever. Eric Drexler, thought by many to be the father of nanotechnology, wrote in the 1990s about molecular assemblers, hypothetical machines capable of manipulating matter and constructing molecules on the nano level, with scales of a billionth of a meter.

 

Robert Frietas is estimating late 2020's for desktop nanofabricators.

Eric Drexler says mid 2030's

 

I think this guys estimates might be a little conservative but still a great article.



#640
bgates276

bgates276

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 330 posts

Hmm, so at that point, will that mean really cheap manufacturing costs, but a premium on the blueprints and the intellectual property used to design them? Will this actually mean cheaper technology, or simply a reallocation of costs? If artificial intelligence is actually engineering the designs, that may not be much of a concern. Honestly though, I can see them undercutting costs by some, but not by a huge amount compared to what we have today. Businesses still need to establish or maintain a positive financial position in order to continue to operate. I'm sure new and better designs will be introduced as time passes, which make the old models obsolete, and this is how the business cycle will continue to operate.  

 

There is one alternative though. I'm sure there will be a thriving market of pirated blueprints that you can download from underground sites on the internet for free. 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nanotechnology, nano, microtechnology, micro, material science, metamaterials, graphene, atomic engineering, molecular manufacturing, nanobots

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users