Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

These ads will disappear if you register on the forum

Photo

Beyond Mars

elon musk spacex outer solar system

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1
Jakob

Jakob

    Fenny-Eyed Slubber-Yuck

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,241 posts
  • LocationIn the Basket of Deplorables

We've known for a while that Elon Musk's ITS is capable of traveling beyond Mars, though there aren't any set-in-stone plans for where or when. With that in mind, what do we think?

 

The next target after Mars will probably be one or more of the moons of Jupiter. It's unlikely we'll see permanent colonization beyond Mars until the later part of this century or the early part of the next, but manned visits seem almost definite to me. Assuming there aren't any major disasters, I'm wondering when and where the first manned mission beyond Mars would be. It seems reasonable that it could be as early as the 2050-2060 timeframe assuming all goes well on Mars. I'd guess either Europa (most valuable, but full of dangerous radiation) or Ganymede (not as valuable, but less dangerous) though Callisto is also possible. By this point, quite a few ITS ships will be launching at every window, so one could be spared for the journey. And due to the size, it wouldn't be like Apollo, where NASA had to just give a bunch of fighter pilots a crash course in swinging a hammer and set them loose on the moon. With such payloads, there would easily be room for dozens of professional scientists. Will Elon still be in charge by this point, or will he have retired to Mars?

 

spacex-interplanetary-transport-europa.j

Credit: SpaceX

 

Saturn and its moons would be next I guess, perhaps in the 2060-2070 timeframe. Titan and Enceladus are obvious choices, but Dione with its newly discovered ocean is a possibility. By this point, it's probable that the ITS will be fusion-powered, so Saturn would be a pretty good place to have a fuel station. Uranus and Neptune and their moons are probably open by that point, but who would even want to go there? On Earth, we'll probably have a StarTram or something like it, so it'll be far easier to get stuff to orbit and beyond.

spacex-interplanetary-transport-saturn.j

Credit: SpaceX

 

Possible?


Click 'show' to see quotes from great luminaries.

Spoiler

#2
TranscendingGod

TranscendingGod

    2020's the decade of our reckoning

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,554 posts
  • LocationGeorgia
Personally I believe that we cannot accurately gauge the future scenario of space travel after 2050 but of course you did not want to read that because you disagree. A conservative projection of mine would be a solar system that is completely colonized/utilized by the end of the century.

We shall see.

The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#3
Sabrine Crystal

Sabrine Crystal

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 191 posts
  • LocationRio de Janeiro, Brazil

Have you ever read the 2260 post in the timeline?In the 23rd century, many space cities and colonies will be created on every planet of the solar system, including Mercury and Pluto.



#4
Jakob

Jakob

    Fenny-Eyed Slubber-Yuck

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,241 posts
  • LocationIn the Basket of Deplorables

Personally I believe that we cannot accurately gauge the future scenario of space travel after 2050 but of course you did not want to read that because you disagree. A conservative projection of mine would be a solar system that is completely colonized/utilized by the end of the century.

We shall see.

There would have to be an economic incentive. Not many people are going to travel beyond Mars--or even beyond Earth--just because they can. It doesn't take many people to run resource extracting operations throughout the Solar System.


Click 'show' to see quotes from great luminaries.

Spoiler

#5
TranscendingGod

TranscendingGod

    2020's the decade of our reckoning

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,554 posts
  • LocationGeorgia
Colonized/utilized.

Colonization, I would agree, would not be a priority. Utilization would.

The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#6
Jakob

Jakob

    Fenny-Eyed Slubber-Yuck

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,241 posts
  • LocationIn the Basket of Deplorables

Colonized/utilized.

Colonization, I would agree, would not be a priority. Utilization would.

Perhaps, but even then there are limits. The entire Solar System would not be utilized. What resources are there to extract from Mercury or Venus, for example? Why would anyone go to the outer reaches of the Solar System when ices and volatiles can be gathered from the moon or asteroids?


Click 'show' to see quotes from great luminaries.

Spoiler

#7
TranscendingGod

TranscendingGod

    2020's the decade of our reckoning

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,554 posts
  • LocationGeorgia

Colonized/utilized.
Colonization, I would agree, would not be a priority. Utilization would.

Perhaps, but even then there are limits. The entire Solar System would not be utilized. What resources are there to extract from Mercury or Venus, for example? Why would anyone go to the outer reaches of the Solar System when ices and volatiles can be gathered from the moon or asteroids?

This is where your disbelief of the modifications of structures at their most basic level comes into play. If such were the case, the modification of structures, then the simple issue would be acquiring more matter. Again you are probably incredulous of the idea of computation requiring more resources than humans and especially not this century but I believe that will be the case.

Again just fundamentally different views of where the world is headed. Although computation has already permeated into many parts of the world. They consume a great part of our electricity and so I think that computation is going to become even more important in the near future. Let me rephrase computation is becoming more important and occupying more of our resources as we speak.

The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#8
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,750 posts

Once again I have to ask with what? IS this profitable without government loans to companies like spacex.

 

Until we can figure this question out this is a serious no go now that nasa is seen as a bad thing. Of course, asking this question makes me a evil liberal piece of crap and worthy of being blocked.

 

It sure is nice to have a imagination and paint nice pics of spaceships but how are we going to make this a reality?


To follow my work on tropical cyclones






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: elon musk, spacex, outer solar system

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users