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The Future of the U.S. House of Representatives

U.S. House of Representatives Politics Chelsea Clinton 2018 Election

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#101
caltrek

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^^^^ To be honest, I am not sure how all of this is going to shake out. It does not look good for Conners future. 

 

For Democrats as a whole, we will have a much clearer picture after the 2018 election.  It seems clear that Democrats will gain seats.  How many is the big question.

 

Oh dear, California will decide who controls the House of Representatives

 

http://www.latimes.c...1201-story.html

 

Introduction:

 

(Los Angeles Times) In Election Day next November, the nation will be watching California to see whether the Democrats can retake the House of Representatives. Nearly one-third of the congressional districts represented by Republicans that Hillary Clinton carried in 2016 are in the Golden State, and if the Democrats are to regain the gavel in the House, they’ll need to win most of those districts. A passel of Democratic challengers have already announced they’re running against the Republican incumbents, and thousands of activists from such groups as Indivisible have begun mobilizing voters.

 

The outcome of these elections, however, will be determined not only by the appeal and resources of the candidates, the mobilizations on their behalf, and President Trump’s unpopularity. A host of other factors — California’s top-two primary system, the likelihood of viable Latino candidates for governor and U.S. senator, the probability of a gas-tax repeal initiative, and the efforts of Democratic candidates for statewide office to win Republican voters — will likely play a crucial role in deciding the congressional contests the Democrats need to win.

 

Midterm elections are invariably about turnout: The party that does the better job of getting its voters to the polls is usually the winner. That will present a massive obstacle to California Republicans next November, inasmuch as their membership has so shriveled in recent years that they can no longer field competitive candidates in statewide races. What compounds their challenge is the state’s bizarre jungle primary, in which the top two finishers, regardless of party, advance to the November runoff.

 

That means that potential Republican voters a year hence (if recent polls are even marginally accurate) will likely be confronted with two Democratic candidates for governor, Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom and former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, and two Democratic candidates for U.S. Senate, incumbent Dianne Feinstein and State Senate President Kevin de León. These are not choices that will spur many Republicans to bother going to the polls, which could have a significant effect on the GOP’s efforts to hold its embattled congressional and state legislative seats.

 

Compounding the Republicans’ challenge will be the probability of heightened Latino turnout. Trump’s broadsides against fictitious “Mexican rapists” and his heightened efforts to deport people in the country illegally have understandably bestirred California Latinos

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#102
caltrek

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This Ridiculous GOP Gerrymander Could Give Democrats a Better Crack at Winning the House

 

http://www.motherjon...t-at-the-house/

 

Introduction:

 

(Mother Jones) Creed’s Seafood and Steaks in King-of-Prussia, Pennsylvania, looks like any other restaurant tucked up against a highway intersection, a place for diners in the Philadelphia exurbs to drive for a chop and a couple of glasses of wine.

 

The state’s 7th District has been likened to a drawing of Goofy kicking Donald Duck.

 

But it also happens to be a significant piece of Pennsylvania’s political geography—and part of the reason Republican control of Congress could, despite the GOP’s troubles, be hard for Democrats to break in 2018. The state’s 7th congressional district, whose convoluted shape has been likened to a drawing of Goofy kicking Donald Duck, snakes through a bottleneck as narrow as the restaurant and its parking lot, forming a tiny land bridge that connects pools of mostly Republican voters.

 

On Monday, Pennsylvania’s appellate Commonwealth Court will begin hearing a now fast-tracked case that could invalidate the 2011 map that created the 7th District and the state’s 17 other congressional districts. The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania has ordered the lower court to issue, by year’s end, a ruling on whether the map is an unconstitutional gerrymander, holding open the possibility that all the state’s districts could be redrawn before the 2018 midterm elections.

 

While Pennsylvania has roughly equal numbers of Democratic and Republican voters (Donald Trump won here by just 44,000 votes out of more than 6 million cast), for the last six years its congressional delegation has been made up of 13 Republicans and just five Democrats, who mostly represent Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. As Democrats scour the country for the approximately two dozen candidates and winnable districts they’ll need to take back the House, a redrawn congressional map in Pennsylvania could present the party with some prime opportunities to pick up seats.

20171207_pa71.png?w=990

 

Pennsylvania’s 7th congressional district.

Mother Jones; National Atlas


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#103
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Arizona State Sen. Kimberly Yee Expresses Interest in Franks’ Seat

 

https://www.rollcall...ce=weekendreads

 

Introduction:

 

(Roll Call) Arizona state Sen. Kimberly Yee expressed interest in replacing Republican Rep. Trent Franks after he announced his resignation on Thursday.

 

Franks, who represents Arizona’s 8th District, announced he would resign after amid a House Ethics Committee Investigation about discussions he had with two female staffers about surrogacy.

 

In a message to CQ, Yee responded “Yes, I am interested.”

 

“I have received a lot of encouragement to run for Congress and I am considering it,” she wrote.

 

If elected, Yee would be the first Republican woman of Chinese descent elected to the House of Representatives.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: U.S. House of Representatives, Politics, Chelsea Clinton, 2018 Election

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