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#21
Alric

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Ideally we want to get to a point where no one has to work. We want to eliminate all these jobs. The big problem is our current economy, which requires everyone to have a job and to work just to survive. We need to fix the economy, so people don't have to work to survive. Stuff like a basic income and stuff like that. Which should ultimately be a short term solution, which the long term solution being the phasing out of all money.

 

We have the technology and resources, where everyone on the planet could have clean water, food and shelter. Yet millions of people die every year due to poverty, starvation, diseases from poor sanitation and stuff like that. People die from crime, which ultimately comes from the same sources as the above issues. No one would rob a bank if there was no money. And the cases caused from mental illness could be solved if we were giving basic health and mental care to everyone.



#22
caltrek

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The Hidden History Made at Sakuma Brothers Farms

 

http://fairworldproj...thers-Farms.pdf

 

Introduction:

 

History was made on September 12, 2016 with the election of Familias Unidas por la Justicia (FUJ) to represent hand harvesters at Sakuma Brothers Farms in Washington state. FUJ is an independent union, one of only a handful of farmworker unions outside of California, the only state with a legal framework to oversee union elections and collective bargaining, and the first union to be led by indigenous Mixteco and Trique farmworkers from Mexico.

 

Hundreds of voters came to cast ballots at Sakuma Brothers Farms on that day. The paper ballots were hand counted before a small crowd including representatives of the farm and union as well as independent observers. The election itself and the formal recognition of the union, who won the vote 195–58, were historic. But a quieter history was made even before that day. Just a week before the election, the farm and the union signed a legally binding Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) outlining the election process, agreements regarding public communication and conduct by both sides, and the contract negotiation process that would follow should FUJ win the election. Note that farmworkers are not covered by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), the law covering union recognition and collective bargaining.

 

Creating a process took the better part of the summer and helped address concerns in a neutral and fair manner. For example, one of the non-union farmworkers raised concerns that he had seen a list of workers the union had. He was afraid they were counting workers who had never agreed to be union members. The mutually agreed on process covered such concerns, spelling out that the election would be by secret ballot and that eligibility criteria included the number of hours worked in the current season. Any lists, public statements for or against the union, or any previous commitments were irrelevant. Only the vote cast at the election mattered. Though FUJ won the election by a wide margin, it was not unanimous. Fifty-eight workers voted against the union, either because they preferred no representation or would have preferred different representation…. However, even those who voted against the union now have a democratic voice within the union. 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#23
Alislaws

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Here is a question for those who insist that automation/robots/AI are taking all of our jobs.  How is it that the employment to population ratio in the early 50's was under 56% and it is now over 59%? 

 

 

http://www.macrotren...ion-ratio-chart

i didn't see anyone respond to this, but surely most women would have been considered "unemployed" in the 50s, whereas now they are more often an active part of the work force?

 

I don't see everyone getting married and only having one breadwinner per family being a realistic solution to rising unemployment. In general people living near large cities (where most of the jobs are) seem to need 2 incomes to afford a family. 



#24
Alice Tepes

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This isn't a problem that can be fixed by means of capitalism. and tech does not create the same number of jobs that it takes away. I don't know how the government's will try to fix this but if they try to protect human employment or do nothing our current economic system will collapse eventually because AI will become as good or better than humans at everything we do.


aspiring gynoid macrointelligence


#25
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Unionizing Only First Step to a More Just Economy for These Farm Workers

 

 

https://nonprofitqua...y-farm-workers/

 

Introduction:

 

On Sakuma Brothers berry farms in Washington state, indigenous migrant workers drew on the strength of their community to fight for workers’ rights and union representation. After four years, they have succeeded and formed Familias Unidas por la Justicia (FUJ).

 

Fifty-six percent of Americans approve of unions, and the National Labor Relations Board received nearly 3,000 petitions for union formation just for nursing home and non-acute care employees between 2000–2010. Despite these figures, unions are in decline in the United States; in 2016, only 10.7 percent of U.S. laborers were part of a union, with union membership almost evenly split between government and private sector employees, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Jobs with Justice policy analyst Michael Wasser asserts that “current law does not offer working people a level playing field, advantaging chief executives set on denying their employees’ right to organize and negotiate together.”

 

In western Washington, however, a group of indigenous farm laborers has beaten the odds and formed the first new farm workers union in 25 years. For years, Mixtecos and Zapotecos from the state of Oaxaca in Mexico have been coming to this area to pick berries and other crops, many as undocumented migrants. One in ten U.S. laborers overall is undocumented, but the figure rises to one in two for farm workers. On farms and elsewhere, indigenous peoples (as NPQ has documented) face disproportionate levels of discrimination, unsafe working conditions, and violence.

 

“We are part of a movement of indigenous people,” says Felimon Pineda, FUJ vice president. “Sometimes people see us as being very low. They think we have no rights. They’re wrong. The right to be human is the same.”

 

Systemic discrimination is compounded by the fact that most of the workers don’t speak English, and many don’t even speak Spanish; they speak Triqui and Mixteco, which Sakuma representatives do not. Ramon Torres from Guadalajara was elected to represent the workers in negotiations (and ultimately became president of the union) even though he is not technically a member of the indigenous community, in part because he is able to communicate in Spanish.

 

 

See also post #22 above

 

blackberries.jpg

"Blackberries 05.”

Credit: Seher Media


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#26
caltrek

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Much of what Trump does feels entirely unprecedented.  However, this feels more like the ghost of Ronald Reagan returning.

 

Trump’s Labor Board Appointments Are Another Blow for Unions

 

http://www.motherjon...low-for-unions/

 

Introduction:

 

n 2000, Donald Trump wrote in his book The America We Deserve that “with the globalization craze in full heat, unions are about the only force reminding us to remember the American family.” During last year’s presidential campaign, he boasted that he had “tremendous support within unions” and then received a larger share of the union vote than any Republican since Ronald Reagan. 

 

But as president, he hasn’t always repaid the favor. On Wednesday, a Senate committee approved two Trump nominees, Marvin Kaplan and William Emanuel, to the National Labor Relations Board who have long records of fighting unions. If they are confirmed by the full Senate, Republican appointees will control the five-person board and be able to undo rulings that made it easier for workers to form unions.  

 

During the Obama administration, the NLRB, an independent agency tasked with protecting workers’ right to organize, frustrated employers by consistently siding with workers. The board redefined what counts as an employer, making it easier for workers at fast-food restaurants and other franchised businesses to form a union. It opened the door to “micro-unions” by allowing nursing assistants to unionize independently of their coworkers, and it allowed graduate-student employees at private universities to unionize.

 

Perhaps most important, the board ruled that workers, regardless of union status, cannot be forced to sign arbitration agreements that require disputes to be resolved by individual tribunals instead of class-action lawsuits argued before an open court. Former Fox News host Gretchen Carlson, for example, was prevented from suing Fox for sexual harassment because she signed such an agreement. After she got around it by suing the late Fox CEO Roger Ailes directly, more than 20 women accused Ailes of harassment. 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#27
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Meet the Anti-Union Crusader in Charge of Rolling Back Regulations at Trump’s Labor Department

 

 

http://www.motherjon...bor-department/

 

Introduction:

 

President Donald Trump likes to tout his affinity for the American worker. He’s climbed into an American-made big rig in the White House driveway. He’s donned a hard hat while addressing West Virginia coal miners. And he’s boasted about hiring “thousands and thousands and thousands” of union workers.

 

But on Trump’s first Labor Day as president, it’s clear that his Labor Department is mostly focused on rolling back regulations that protect the blue-collar workers Trump celebrates. The department has delayed several rules that would limit workers’ exposure to carcinogens and has begun to undo the Obama administration’s signature labor achievements. And its policy and regulation team is now led by a man who has made a career out of fighting unions.

 

Nathan Mehrens became the department’s head of policy in June, leading an office that Sharon Block, who headed it under President Barack Obama, says served as the Labor Department’s think tank. Bloomberg reported last month that Mehrens is also running the department’s regulatory reform office. In that role, he will work with a still-unformed task force to identify regulations that should be eliminated. (The Labor Department did not respond to requests to confirm Mehrens’ role.)

 

Since getting his law degree from a conservative Christian correspondence schoolthat emphasizes “the centrality of Scripture,” Mehrens has spent his professional life rooting out union corruption. That work appears to have begun with a stint at Stop Union Political Abuse (SUPA), a now-defunct group started  by Linda Chavez after unions helped sink her nomination to be President George W. Bush’s secretary of labor. Chavez would go on to write that donating to SUPA would “cripple liberal politics” by helping pass a right-to-work law…

 

Conclusion:

…On Wednesday, (President of the AFL-CIO Richard) Trumka made clear that he no longer thinks there is much chance of a productive relationship with the Trump administration. “You had two factions in the White House,” he said at a roundtable discussion. “You had one faction that actually had some of the policies that we would have supported on trade and infrastructure, but they turned out to be racist. And on the other hand, you had people who weren’t racist, but they were Wall Streeters.” The Wall Street faction, he said, had won.

170902_trump-coal-miner-fixed1.jpg?w=990

President Donald Trump shakes hands with a coal miner in February. Trump's Labor Department has delayed several regulations that protect workers.

REX/AP


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#28
caltrek

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Workers Accuse Tesla of Thwarting Union Efforts

 

https://www.courthou...-union-efforts/

 

Introduction:

 

SAN JOSE, Calif. (CN) – The National Labor Relations Board hit Tesla with a complaint Thursday night, creating a headache for the largest electric vehicle manufacturer just days before the United States celebrates workers on Labor Day.

 

The complaint says Elon Musk’s celebrated technology and auto-manufacturing company has been routinely harassing and intimidating employees trying to create a union for workers who’ve voiced concerns about overwork and employee safety at the Fremont, California, Tesla plant.

 

Tesla strongly refuted the labor relations board’s allegations in a statement released Thursday night, saying the United Auto Workers’ “publicity campaign” against Tesla has more to do with flagging membership and influence than any substantive problems at the Fremont plant.

 

“As we approach Labor Day weekend, there’s a certain irony in just how far the UAW has strayed from the original mission of the American labor movement, which once advocated so nobly for the rights of workers and is the reason we recognize this important holiday,” Tesla said in a statement through a company spokesman.

 

However, multiple reports show three workers claim they handled dangerous chemicals without appropriate safety measures, and those claims are separate from the complaints filed with the labor relations board on Thursday.

tesla-field.jpeg


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#29
caltrek

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Confidentiality Agreement

 

https://www.courthou...lity-agreement/

 

Entire Story:

 

MANHATTAN – The Second Circuit agreed Thursday that the Long Island Association for AIDS Care violated federal labor law by firing a worker who refused to sign an unlawful confidentiality agreement, the terms of which barred employees from discussing wages and other working conditions.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#30
caltrek

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When the Parades Are Over, Who Stands With Unions?

 

https://ourfuture.or...nds-with-unions

 

Introduction:

 

The Labor Day parades are over. The bands have packed up. The muscular speeches celebrating workers are finished. The trash is getting collected from parks across the country.  And now conservative politicians from Trump on down will revive their systematic efforts to weaken unions and undermine workers.

 

Trump – despite all the populist bunting that decorates his speeches – sustains the deeply entrenched Republican antipathy to organized workers. Their attack is relentless.

Trump’s budget calls for deep cuts in the Labor Department, eviscerating job training programs and cutting – by 40 percent – the agency that does research on workplace safety. It would eliminate the program that funds education of workers on how to avoid workplace hazards. It even savages money for mine safety enforcement for the miners Trump claims to love.

 

Trump is systematically reversing any Obama rule that aided workers. He signed legislation scrapping the rule that required federal contractors to disclose violations of workplace safety and employment and anti-discrimination laws. His Labor Secretary has announced his intention to strip millions of workers of the overtime pay they would have received under Obama DOL regulations.

 

Trump is creating a pro-business majority at the National Labor Relations Board, which will roll back Obama’s efforts to make it easier for workers to organize, and make it possible to hold home companies responsible for the employment practices of their franchisees.

 

The GOP’s Anti-Union Strategy

 

This is simply standard operating procedure for today’s Republican party. Long ago, Republicans realized that organized labor was a central “pillar,” as Grover Norquist described it, of Democratic Party strength. Now Republican office holders at every level – from county officials to statehouses to judges – know that their job is to weaken labor unions. From right to work laws to administrative regulations to court challenges, Republicans sustain an unrelenting attack.

 

50064v.jpg?w=829

 

Labor Day parade on Pennsylvania Avenue in the vicinity of Kernan's Lyceum Theater and unfinished Post Office building in Washington D.C. 1894

Courtesy Library of Congress


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#31
caltrek

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The collapse of the bargaining power of organized labor continues to have implications for the growing inequality of wealth in this country.  New tech industries now act with impunity in ignoring the desire for collective bargaining right.  The linked article helps to describe this sorry state of affairs.

 

Contract laborers at tech companies should be allowed to organize

 

https://techcrunch.c...ed-to-organize/

 

Introduction:

 

Although median household income rose last year for the second year in a row (thanks, Obama), working families still face overwhelming challenges. Immigrant rights are under attack. Workers are forced to fight for basic dignity and justice. Health care access is readily threatened. Quality childcare is scarce. But the biggest challenge is growing economic inequality.

 

This is fueled in part by businesses that rely on contract labor — a well-known tactic to drive down worker wages in order to create million-dollar executive paydays. These corporations use contract labor as a tool to crush worker attempts to negotiate fair wages and as a loophole to avoid paying for quality health insurance, family and medical leave, worker education and worker retraining.

 

As an Asian American woman leader of a labor rights organization and a regular consumer with many choices, I am constantly faced with the decision of sacrificing my ideals for the sake of convenience or cost. That might mean looking past toxic corporate culture to take an Uber over a taxi or risking racial profiling to book an Airbnb over a hotel.

 

Choosing companies that rely on contract labor should pose similar dilemmas to conscious consumers. Behind small decisions, like what app to use, lie real consequences for workers. But when it comes to some of the worst offenders — the biggest tech companies that have become an inextricable part of our everyday lives — we aren’t left with much of a choice.

Facebook preaches its goal “to focus every day on how to build real value for the world.” Google famously shouts its motto, “Don’t be evil.” But when it comes to treating workers fairly, the reality for Big Tech’s tens of thousands of contract workers can be dramatically different.

shutterstock_151379408.jpg?w=738


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#32
caltrek

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The Cruel Exploitation of Farmworkers Continues Unabated—Only Organizing Can Turn It Around

 

https://www.alternet...-turn-it-around

 

Extract:

 

(Alternet) Founded in 1993, the Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW) first targeted tomato growers, but years of marches and strikes convinced them the growers were not going to raise wages or improve working conditions unless buyers of their tomatoes would help cover the cost. The CIW began targeting buyers of tomatoes: grocery stores, restaurants, institutional food service companies.

 

The workers' demand was easy to communicate to the general public: an additional penny a pound for the tomatoes they picked. At the time pickers were earning about 1.5 cents per pound, not much more than they had collected 25 years before. To put that penny in context, we pay $1 to $4 per pound in the grocery store for those tomatoes. An extra penny a pound would cost the average family a paltry 40 cents a year but as McMillan observes, if “the premium went toward wages, workers would, in effect, receive a nearly 80 percent raise.”

 

The Campaign for Fair Food’s chose as its first target Taco Bell. Student customers immensely aided the campaign. At more than 300 college campuses and 50 high schools they urged people to “Boot the Bell” until the chain responded to the workers' demands. At one point 22 colleges banned Taco Bell from operating.

 

In 2005, after four years of picketing, organizing, and demonstrating, the workers finally convinced Taco Bell and its parent company, Yum! Brands, to agree to their a-penny-more demand. Two years later, McDonald’s signed up. In 2008, Burger King, Subway, and Whole Foods Market followed suit. In 2010, the campaign added Aramark and Sodexo, two of the country’s largest institutional food service companies, to its list of partners. In 2012 Chipotle and Trader Joe's agreed. In 2014 and 2015 Walmart and Ahold, respectively, agreed to work on behalf of the 30,000 workers in their combined supply chains.

 

…Companies that comply with the Fair Food Program are committed to buy tomatoes only from growers who agree with the CIW Code of Conduct (see linked article for bullets describing the CIW). 

untitled_design_7_5.jpg?itok=F5G9TP3N

The Immokalee region in southwestern Florida grows one-third of all U.S. tomatoes.

Photo Credit: withoon_life / Shutterstock


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#33
caltrek

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In Great Britain, Uber Has Lost An Appeal Against A Ruling That Gave Drivers Workers' Rights

 

https://www.buzzfeed...4e0#.nl6a2a0mJQ

 

Introduction:

 

Uber has lost an appeal against a court ruling that found a group of drivers were entitled to holiday pay, sick pay, and the minimum wage.

 

The Employment Appeal Tribunal dismissed the company's appeal against the "landmark" ruling made in 2016.

 

BuzzFeed News understands Uber will proceed with further appeals, with the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court two possible stages in the appeal process.

 

In September, Uber appealed the 2016 tribunal ruling that found Uber had incorrectly classified a group of workers as self-employed rather than as contracted "workers".

The case is central to arguments about whether gig economy companies are relying on genuinely self-employed labour or are misclassifying employment status. It is significant because "workers" under the law are entitled to rights like sick pay and the minimum wage, whereas the self-employed are not.

sub-buzz-17446-1510304740-5.jpg?downsize


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#34
caltrek

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Because women and Latinos are workers too:

 

Pay Survey’s Rollback Draws Fire Against White House

 

https://www.courthou...re-white-house/

 

Introduction:

 

WASHINGTON (Courthouse News) — Fighting to keep employers from withholding vital data, two groups say in a federal complaint that recent interference by the Trump administration hurts their ability to close race and gender pay gaps.

 

The National Women’s Law Center and Labor Council for Latin American Advancement brought their Nov. 15 complaint in Washington less than three months after an abrupt policy reversal by the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, a subsidiary of the Office of Management and Budget.

 

Targeted by the office’s machinations were recent revisions to an employer survey put out by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

 

...In 2016 the EEOC made it so that its longstanding employer survey, known as the EEO-1, would start collecting W-2 earnings data for employees by sex, race, ethnicity and job category.

 

There is good reason for the government to collect such data, the complaint alleges, blaming “the persistence of race and gender pay gaps” in part on the dearth of comparative salary and wage information.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#35
caltrek

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I suppose now there will once again be complaints about how stories like this (see both above and below)  further "identity politics".  As if minorities should just shut up and put up with the special outrages that they face.

 

Farm Workers Claim North Carolina Law Violates Their Right to Unionize

 

https://www.courthou...right-unionize/

 

Introduction:

 

(Courthouse News) – Farm workers in North Carolina claim in court that a recently approved amendment to the state’s Farm Act unfairly targets Latinos and other immigrants and prevents them from unionizing.

 

In a federal complaint filed Thursday in the Greensboro, North Carolina, the two lead plaintiffs and the Farm labor Organizing Committee claim the Act “mandates that agreements by agricultural employers to administer payroll union dues deductions requested by employees … [are] invalid and unenforceable.”

 

Secondly, they say, “the Act declares that settlement agreements that include a stipulation that an agricultural employer will recognize or enter into an agreement with a union shall be invalid and unenforceable.”

 

The plaintiffs say both mechanisms voided by the amendment have been relied on by migrant and immigrant farm workers in North Carolina for decades.

 

They claim the amendment was an act of retaliation by State Sen. Brent Jackson, owner of Jackson Farming Inc., who had to settle a wage theft case with plaintiff Valentine Hernandez n 2016.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#36
caltrek

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I Was a Warehouse Wage Slave

 

http://www.motherjon...rehouses-labor/

 

Introduction:

 

“Don’t take anything that happens to you there personally,” the woman at the local chamber of commerce says when I tell her that tomorrow I start working at “Amalgamated Product Giant Shipping Worldwide Inc.” She winks at me. I stare at her for a second.

 

“What?” I ask. “Why, is somebody going to be mean to me or something?”

 

She smiles. “Oh, yeah.” This town somewhere west of the Mississippi is not big; everyone knows someone or is someone who’s worked for Amalgamated. “But look at it from their perspective. They need you to work as fast as possible to push out as much as they can as fast as they can. So they’re gonna give you goals, and then you know what? If you make those goals, they’re gonna increase the goals. But they’ll be yelling at you all the time. It’s like the military. They have to break you down so they can turn you into what they want you to be. So they’re going to tell you, ‘You’re not good enough, you’re not good enough, you’re not good enough,’ to make you work harder. Don’t say, ‘This is the best I can do.’ Say, ‘I’ll try,’ even if you know you can’t do it. Because if you say, ‘This is the best I can do,’ they’ll let you go. They hire and fire constantly, every day. You’ll see people dropping all around you. But don’t take it personally and break down or start crying when they yell at you.”

 

Several months prior, I’d reported on an Ohio warehouse where workers shipped products for online retailers under conditions that were surprisingly demoralizing and dehumanizing, even to someone who’s spent a lot of time working in warehouses, which I have. And then my editors sat me down. “We want you to go work for Amalgamated Product Giant Shipping Worldwide Inc.,” they said. I’d have to give my real name and job history when I applied, and I couldn’t lie if asked for any specifics. (I wasn’t.) But I’d smudge identifying details of people and the company itself. Anyway, to do otherwise might give people the impression that these conditions apply only to one warehouse or one company. Which they don’t.

 

So I fretted about whether I’d have to abort the application process, like if someone asked me why I wanted the job. But no one did. And though I was kind of excited to trot out my warehouse experience, mainly all I needed to get hired was to confirm 20 or 30 times that I had not been to prison.

cover_372_720-630.jpg?w=990

 

Illustration by Mark Matcho


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls





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