Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

These ads will disappear if you register on the forum

Photo

USA Watch Thread

America USA Politics Military Wars Science Information News Economy Geopolitics

  • Please log in to reply
232 replies to this topic

#161
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,248 posts

@ Caltrek Labeling peaceful protesters a threat and violently suppressing them is a very effective way to turn peaceful people into violent insurgents. I mean at what point does someone decide they've had enough. When they are forced to be silent? When they are treated as a second class citizen? When they are labeled a terrorist for holding a sign? We all saw this coming, it was only a matter of time before the state started using the terrorist card against its own people.

 

Actually, a well disciplined movement will not respond violently to provocation.  (Unless you consider an appeal for legal remedies that might involve use of governmental force as an act of violence.  Some anarchists I have known would reject such appeals to the legal system precisely because they do feel they are violent.)

 

I am reminded of the assassination scene in the movie Gandhi.  As soon as Gandhi was shot all of his followers fell to the ground in prayer or in an otherwise peaceful manner.  Only the provocateurs where left standing shouting for violence, and were thus easily identified as not true followers.

 

I don't know if that actual scene was accurate, but something like that occurs on a regular basis during protests.  


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#162
Erowind

Erowind

    Psychonaut, Aspiring Mathematician and Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 529 posts
  • LocationInside some convoluted formula I don't actually understand.

 

@ Caltrek Labeling peaceful protesters a threat and violently suppressing them is a very effective way to turn peaceful people into violent insurgents. I mean at what point does someone decide they've had enough. When they are forced to be silent? When they are treated as a second class citizen? When they are labeled a terrorist for holding a sign? We all saw this coming, it was only a matter of time before the state started using the terrorist card against its own people.

 

Actually, a well disciplined movement will not respond violently to provocation.  (Unless you consider an appeal for legal remedies that might involve use of governmental force as an act of violence.  Some anarchists I have known would reject such appeals to the legal system precisely because they do feel they are violent.)

 

I am reminded of the assassination scene in the movie Gandhi.  As soon as Gandhi was shot all of his followers fell to the ground in prayer or in an otherwise peaceful manner.  Only the provocateurs where left standing shouting for violence, and were thus easily identified as not true followers.

 

I don't know if that actual scene was accurate, but something like that occurs on a regular basis during protests.  

 

 

The only reasons mass peace movements like Ghandi's India succeed are because the state permitted them, as in, an independent India was not an existential threat to the empire and in some ways was in interest of the empire. When one's movement is an existential threat, peacefully taking abuse won't accomplish anything. I'm not advocating mindless violence, but violence in self defense is entirely justified. With this said, care should to be taken to minimize loss of life and avoid violence as much as possible. Another area where peaceful protesting accomplishes nothing is when the group being protested can ignore the protesters and carry on. For example, had the insurgents during the Battle of Blair Mountain decided to peacefully protest instead--as many did in the past--they would have been met with violent corporate goons and gotten fired. From there the mining company would have hired replacements and went on with business as usual. The Battle of Blair Mountian was a pyrrhic victory for the mining corporation and lead to mainstream awareness of the atrocious conditions that coal miners of the time endured, which later led to labor reform.


Current status: slaving away for the math gods of Pythagoras VII.


#163
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,248 posts

 

 

The only reasons mass peace movements like Gandhi's India succeed are because the state permitted them, as in, an independent India was not an existential threat to the empire and in some ways was in interest of the empire. 

 

 

Perhaps, but that was very far from the initial position taken by the British government.  It was only through struggle that the state finally "permitted" success.

 

 

 

When one's movement is an existential threat, peacefully taking abuse won't accomplish anything

 

 

As discussed in other threads, what constitutes an existential threat is far from a straightforward an obvious thing.

 

 

 

I'm not advocating mindless violence, but violence in self defense is entirely justified.

 

 

Even Martin Luther King thought that self-defense was justifiable. So, one can embrace nonviolent tactics without having to totally give up on the notion of the right to self-defense. 

 

 

 

With this said, care should to be taken to minimize loss of life and avoid violence as much as possible. 

 

Unless I am missing something, this is consistent with King's position.

 

 

 

Another area where peaceful protesting accomplishes nothing is when the group being protested can ignore the protesters and carry on.

 

Oh, I am not suggesting that all problems can magically disappear because a group decides on a day of protest.  Typically, such struggles can be of a protracted nature in which immediate results are not forthcoming.  A day or two of peaceful protest is merely an event or two in such a long process.

 

 

 

For example, had the insurgents during the Battle of Blair Mountain decided to peacefully protest instead--as many did in the past--they would have been met with violent corporate goons and gotten fired. From there the mining company would have hired replacements and went on with business as usual. The Battle of Blair Mountian was a pyrrhic victory for the mining corporation and lead to mainstream awareness of the atrocious conditions that coal miners of the time endured, which later led to labor reform.

 

 

I am not familiar with the particular example you cite, but your description is consistent with the kind of process that I am describing.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#164
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,766 posts

Tribes in Columbia River Gorge hit by White House decision
Source: Associated Press

Andrew Selsky, Associated Press
Updated 8:26 pm, Monday, October 30, 2017

 

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Trump administration is neglecting the U.S. government's obligation to build new homes for Indians whose original abodes were submerged by dams along the Columbia River, members of Congressional delegations from Oregon and Washington state said.

The hundreds of tribal members are living in dilapidated trailers and other substandard housing along the Columbia River. The promised new homes haven't been built yet even though decades have passed since the dams were built. Now a funding decision by the White House's Office of Management and Budget has put even the preparation work on hold.

In a letter, the politicians told Mick Mulvaney, director Office of Management and Budget, that "the federal government has a legal and moral responsibility" to maintain the funding. They urged him to reconsider his decision.

The letter, dated Friday and released to the media on Monday, was signed by Sens. Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell of Washington, Sens. Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Rep. Earl Blumenauer of Oregon. All of the lawmakers are Democrats.

 

Read more: http://www.chron.com...#photo-14454257


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#165
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,766 posts

'I want to quit': Fox News employees say their network's Russia coverage was 'an embarrassment'
Source: CNN

 


by Oliver Darcy @oliverdarcy

October 31, 2017: 1:21 PM ET

 

Some employees at Fox News were left embarrassed and humiliated by their network's coverage of the latest revelations in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian election meddling, according to conversations CNN had with several individuals placed throughout the network.

-snip-

On Monday, it was revealed that President Trump's former campaign manager Paul Manafort and another associate Rick Gates had been indicted by a grand jury on 12 counts, including conspiracy against the United States. Unsealed court records also revealed that another Trump associate, George Papadopoulos, had pleaded guilty to making a false statement to the FBI weeks ago.

The revelations jolted through the news media, and Fox News did cover it as its top story. But in contrast with CNN and MSNBC, which aired non-stop rolling coverage throughout the day, Fox News found plenty of time to cover other topics, like the NFL protests, North Korea, and tax reform.

Additionally, Fox News aired segments that questioned Mueller's credibility and many were framed around how Trump and his allies were responding to the news. On Fox News' homepage, the lead story at one point was focused on Trump slamming the indictment. Another lead story cited Manafort's lawyer, and asked, "Mueller's 'ridiculous' claims?"

"This kind of coverage does the viewer a huge disservice and further divides the country," one Fox News personality told CNN.

 

Read more: http://money.cnn.com...=hp-toplead-dom


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#166
PhoenixRu

PhoenixRu

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,519 posts
  • LocationRussia

One of reasonable voices from USA. It seems they're becoming rare on the background of this current McCarthyism:

 

Revealed: How The Russians Stole Our Election

 

jesus-russians.jpg?width=443px&height=44

 

Now we can see why they initially tried to keep a lid on the content of the infamous "Russia-linked" social media advertisements. Today, while grilling representatives of Google, Facebook, and Twitter, the Senate Intelligence Committee released a number of social media ads they claim were taken out by "Russia-linked" accounts for the purpose of interfering in the US electoral process. 
 
The ads were supposed to have swayed Americans away from Hillary and toward Trump...or undermined our confidence in democracy...or...well something bad! But the truth is they were so strange and even funny (see above) that one might be led to believe someone is having a giant joke on everyone who is pushing the "Russia meddled" story.
 

This was a sophisticated Russian operation targeting the American electoral system?

 

Cyberwarfare...

 

Sen. Diane Feinstein screeched at the representatives of Google, Twitter, and Facebook at the hearing today:
 
"What we’re talking about is a cataclysmic change. What we’re talking about is the beginning of cyberwarfare. What we’re talking about is a major foreign power with sophistication and ability to involve themselves in a presidential election and sow conflict and discontent all over this country. We are not going to go away, gentlemen. And this is a very big deal"
 
Examples of "cyberwarfare". Russian infiltrators in twitter:
 
Twitter's criteria for determining which accounts were "Russia-linked" should raise some alarm bells. According to a prepared statement by Sean J. Edgett Acting General Counsel, Twitter, Inc., the company considers a user "Russia-linked" if any of the following criteria are met:
 
(1) the account had a Russian email address, mobile number, credit card, or login IP; 
 
(2) Russia was the declared country on the account; or 
 
(3) Russian language or Cyrillic characters appeared in the account information or name.
 
Well, my own account perfectly meets all these criteria. Furthermore, sometimes i write sarcastic tweets about US affairs! Yes, not as often as about Russia or Ukraine, but this is still the "act of cyberwarfare", according to twiiter admins. Of course, I'm used to idea that, with current course of event, I'll lose this account withnin next 2-3 years, as this already happened to many "Russian trolls and bots". Not a big loss anyway...
 
But wait a minute, look at YouTube:
 
Google released the results of its investigation into "Security and Disinformation in the US 2016 Election" and the results were similarly underwhelming. On YouTube, it identified 18 suspicious channels that "appeared to be political" but that "​also ​posted ​non-political videos, ​e.g., ​personal ​travelogues."
 
These must have been incredibly influential YouTube channels if they helped sway the election. 
 
But no, according to Google:
 
● These ​videos ​generally ​had ​very ​low ​view ​counts; ​only ​around ​3 ​percent ​had ​more ​than ​5,000 views. 
 
● These ​channels’ ​videos ​were ​not ​targeted ​to ​the ​U.S. ​or ​to ​any ​particular ​sector ​of ​the ​U.S. population
 
So the election was manipulated by 18 YouTube channels of people's travel videos (presumably in Russia) that didn't target any particular section of the US population and that no one watched. This is evidence of Sen. Feinstein's "major foreign power with sophistication and ability"?

 

It seems authoritarianism comes not from Trump's camp.


--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---

 

"And the Russian land, let God keep it! Under heavens, there is no other land like this. And although Russian nobles are not righteous neither kind, let God arrange the Russian land and give us enough justice" - Afanasy Nikitin, medieval traveler of XV century.


#167
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,248 posts

Berniecrats Issue Report Criticizing the Democratic National Committee for Failing to Learn Lessons from 2016

 

https://www.alternet...rn-lessons-2016

 

Introduction:

 

(Alternet) During the 2016 campaign, a big reason that Hillary Clinton lost—according to longtime Democratic pollster and Clinton associate Stan Greenberg—was her campaign didn’t look at what was happening on the ground in the final stretch in states like Michigan, where Donald Trump beat Clinton by the smallest margin of any state.

 

The Clinton campaign stopped local tracking polls, pulled back on messaging and lost a state where voters that spring enthusiastically delivered a presidential primary victory to Bernie Sanders. Greenberg’s analysis is among a handful of recent reports suggesting what Democrats need to do differently as they look to 2018.  But where he focuses on campaign nuts and bolts, and an upcoming New York Times Magazine story traces a hapless search for a compelling message, another report this week says the answer is staring the Democratic National Committee in the face—but they don’t see it.

 

 

“There has been a real desire for the national Democratic Party to learn key lessons from 2016,” said Norman Solomon, who organized 2016’s Bernie Delegates Network and is one of four co-authors of Autopsy: The Democratic Party in Crisis. “While there's been real progress in some state parties and local party entities, there are very few indications that the national Democratic Party has done much but double down on a failed set of policies.”

 

 

The national party hasn’t found ways to embrace those who elected 46 percent of delegates to 2016’s national convention. The DNC still does not know how to deal with these Berniecrats, even though some state parties have found ways to bridge gaps and cultivate relationships for 2018.     

 

 

The DNC’s key failures, as elaborated by the Autopsy report, differ from Greenberg’s post-mortem and the upcoming Times Magazine piece. Those portray national leaders either as clueless about their shortcomings or adrift in seeking a compelling message to rebuild their brand. In contrast, Solomon’s report emphasizes the DNC continues to run much as it did in 2016—when it didn’t recognize or respect the candidacy of and supporters drawn to Sanders

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#168
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,766 posts

House Republicans' tax bill would increase taxes for 12 percent of Americans next year
House Republicans' tax bill would increase taxes for 12 percent of Americans next year, according to a new report from the nonpartisan

Tax Policy Center. By 2027, at least 28 percent of Americans would see their taxes rise, the report says. Many of those taking a hit would be people who make less than $48,000 a year.

The vast majority of Americans would get a tax cut if the bill becomes law, TPC found, but the rich would benefit the most. The finding comes amid intense debate over whether this bill does enough to help the middle and working classes, a key promise of President Trump.

The middle of the middle — those making $48,000 to $86,000 — would get an average tax cut of $700 next year, according to TPC. Meanwhile, taxpayers in the top 1 percent (those making more than $730,000) would receive an average cut of $37,000 next year, and the top 0.01 percent (those making more than $3.4 million) would see their after-tax incomes rise by an average of $179,000 in 2018.

-snip-

Ryan often says that a middle income family of four making $59,000 a year would pay $1,182 less in taxes next year, but that amount decrease over time and would be a tax hike for the family by 2024, according to New York University tax professor David Kamin. A key new benefit aimed at helping the middle class -- the Family Flexibility Credit -- goes away after 2022 in the GOP bill. The credit is worth $300 per person or $600 per couple, making it an important tax deduction for the working and middle classes.

 

https://www.washingt...national&wpmk=1


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#169
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,766 posts

John McCain: Tax Reform Is "DOA In The Senate"
It’s official: The Republican tax reform bill is dead on arrival in the Senate now that John McCain has become the third Republican senator to confirm that he plans to vote against it.

 

What’s worse for the Trump administration, McCain reportedly wants the bill to receive input from both parties – a criticism that he cited as his reason for voting against the Trump administration’s plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. This is particularly problematic because there’s approximately zero chance that any Democratic lawmakers will break ranks to vote with Republicans, despite President Donald Trump repeatedly saying that he expects to win a modicum of bipartisan support.
In recent weeks, John McCain has reiterated his demand that Republicans pass their tax plan through a bipartisan process. McCain voted down his party’s Obamacare repeal bill precisely because it failed to meet this standard. And it will be impossible to pass the House plan - or anything close to it - through anything but a secretive, partisan process.

On Monday, Susan Collins declared her opposition to repealing the tax on multimillion-dollar estates. The current bill includes such a repeal, and many House conservatives seem deeply attached to repealing what Republicans have successfully tagged as "the death tax." And for months now, Bob Corker has also insisted that he wouldn’t vote for any tax plan that adds even a penny to the debt, even during the first ten years, where Congress would legally be allowed to do so. As it stands, the House plan would increase the deficit by a total of $1.5 trillion over ten years.

 

http://www.zerohedge...form-doa-senate


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#170
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,248 posts

Maine Ballot Question 2: Expand Medicaid Eligibility

 

https://www.nytimes....icaid-expansion

 

Introduction:

 

(New York Times) Voters in Maine decided on Tuesday to expand access to Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, making the state the first in the nation to settle the issue by referendum.

 

Maine is one of 19 states whose Republican governors or legislatures have refused to expand Medicaid under Obamacare. Other holdouts like Utah and Idaho are closely watching the initiative, as newly formed committees in both those states are working to get a Medicaid expansion question on next year’s ballot. The outcome may offer clues about the salience of the issue in next year’s midterm congressional elections.

 

 

ANSWER

VOTES

PCT.

 

Yes

198,631

59.1%

 

No

137,620

40.9

 

92% reporting (540 of 584 precincts)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#171
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,248 posts

Ohio Ballot Issue 2: Cap State Agency Drug Costs

 

https://www.nytimes....-cap-drug-costs

 

Introduction:

 

Voters in Ohio decided not to approve an initiative on Tuesday that was aimed at reducing the cost of prescription drugs in the state. The measure would have capped the price of prescription drugs purchased by the state government, including Medicaid.

 

The measure drew strong resistance from drug makers, which spent more than $49 million to try to kill it, and the industry is not accustomed to losing political fights. Last year, it successfully killed a measure in California that was similar to the one in Ohio, but only after spending more than $100 million to do so.

 

 

ANSWER

VOTES

PCT.

 

Yes

476,216

20.7%

 

No

1,820,544

79.3

 

100% reporting (8,909 of 8,909 precincts)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#172
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,248 posts

Ravi Bhalla Becomes New Jersey's First Sikh Mayor

 

https://www.msn.com/...ID=ansmsnnews11

 

Introduction:

 

(International Business Times) Indian-American Ravinder Bhalla became the first ever Sikh mayor of Hoboken, New Jersey, after winning Tuesday night's election, following an ugly campaign where he was branded as a "terrorist."

 

Bhalla, who defeated five other mayoral candidates, tweeted after the results: "Thank you Hoboken. I look forward to being your Mayor."

His victory came days after he was targeted by flyers labeling him a terrorist. But the negative publicity did not affect his campaigning.

 

Bhalla, who serves on the City Council, claimed the mayoral victory at Moran's Pub on Garden Street where he was surrounded by dozens of his supporters and his family and friends, NJ.com reported.

 

"Thank you for having faith in me, for having faith in our community, faith in our state, and faith in our country; this is what America is all about," he said, addressing the people inside the packed bar. "We've been through a bruising campaign... but now is the time we come together and see who we can work with to bring this city forward," he added.


  • Cody930 likes this

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#173
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,248 posts

Woman Unseats GOP Lawmaker Who Made Sexist Joke About Women’s March

 

http://www.motherjon...sey-freeholder/

 

Introduction:

 

On Tuesday, life came at John Carman fast.

 

Nearly 10 months after the New Jersey Republican legislator shared a meme asking if the historic Women’s March would be “over in time” for its participants to “cook dinner,” a woman and first-time political candidate who expressed anger over the sexist remarks has ousted Carman from office.

 

Democrat Ashley Bennett will now take Carman’s seat on the Atlantic County Board of Freeholders, a nine-member governing body that oversees politics in the South Jersey county. She was one of thousands of women around the country to dive into politics after Trump’s victory last year

 

“I was angry about [the Facebook meme], because elected officials shouldn’t be on social media mocking and belittling people who are expressing their concerns about their community and the nation,” Bennett said in October.

 

Last month, Carman drew fresh outrage for sporting a Confederate flag patch in the shape of New Jersey on his denim vest. He denied the racist implications of the patch, calling it the “South Jersey Rebel Patch.”

20171108-women.png?w=921

 

Amy Sussman/ZUMA


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#174
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,766 posts

US 'loses 60% of career ambassadors' since January
Source: BBC News

 

The United States has lost 60% of its career ambassadors since January, according to the head of the labour union that represents US diplomats.
"Leadership ranks are being depleted at a dizzying speed," Barbara Stephenson, head of the American Foreign Service Association (AFSA) chief, wrote.
Ms Stephenson, a former ambassador to Panama, says there has been a "decapitation" of top talent.
The BBC has asked the Department of State for a comment.
"The rapid loss of so many senior officers has a serious, immediate, and tangible effect on the capacity of the United States to shape world events," Ms Stephenson writes.
The former ambassador to Panama writes in a forthcoming issue of the Foreign Service Journal that the art of diplomacy must be defended under an administration that she argues appears bent on "dismantling government as we know it".

 

Read more: http://www.bbc.com/news/41921907


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#175
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,248 posts

Did Education Save The Democrats’ Bacon in the Virginia Governor’s Race?

 

https://ourfuture.or...-governors-race

 

Introduction:

 

Ralph Northam’s big win for the Democratic party in the Virginia governor’s election is being hailed as a “rebuke of President Trump.” But it’s also a rebuke of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

 

The race, which was called a “bellwether” and a “must win” for Democrats, is a teachable moment for Democratic party operatives heading into 2018. But the race appeared to stay close the whole time, with RealClear Politics rating it a “toss up” less than a week away from the vote. So what helped Northam pull it out?

 

Most analysts in the media have focused on the campaign tactics employed in the race, especially when the campaign for Ed Gillespie, the Republican, took a Trumpist turn and decided to demonize immigrants, defend Confederate monuments, and portray Northam as soft on crime. But the Virginia race suggests candidates running in swing states will have to get the issues right rather than the rhetoric.

 

In state and local elections education is a top issue, sometimes the top issue. Education is the number one or two priority in most city, county, and state budgets and is a concern for literally every single voter, including adults with no school-aged children who pay taxes to support local schools and rely on the quality of those institutions to bolster their property values and anchor their neighborhoods.

 

In the Virginia governor’s contest, education was the voters’ “top concern,” according to at least one poll.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#176
wjfox

wjfox

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,970 posts
  • LocationLondon

Trump Nominee for Federal Judgeship Has Never Tried a Case

By VIVIAN WANG
NOV. 11, 2017

A 36-year-old lawyer who has never tried a case and who was unanimously deemed “not qualified” by the American Bar Association has been approved for a lifetime federal district judgeship by the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The lawyer, Brett Talley, is the fourth judicial nominee under President Trump to receive a “not qualified” rating from the bar association and the second to receive the rating unanimously.

https://www.nytimes....dge-senate.html


hc8ro3q.jpg



#177
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,766 posts

HuffPost: Zinke Inquired About Redesigning Interior Department Flag
By CAITLIN MACNEAL Published NOVEMBER 14, 2017 12:11 PM
Upon taking office, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke looked into redesigning the department’s flag and making it bigger, emails surfaced by the Huffington Post on Tuesday show.

 

Zinke started inquiring about making the changes just one week after he became the department’s secretary, according to the Huffington Post. In an email one week after Zinke took office, an Interior Department staffer said that Zinke would be able to make the department’s flag and the interior secretary’s flag bigger, so long as they are not larger than the American flag that flies atop the building, according to an email obtained by the Huffington Post. The staffer said it was unclear whether Zinke could change the flags’ design, per the report.

As secretary, Zinke has started a new tradition of raising a secretarial flag atop the department’s Washington, D.C., headquarters when he is in the building, and raising the deputy secretary’s flag when Zinke is out of town.

He has also redecorated his office in the Interior Department with the heads of an elk and a bison mounted on the wall, the Huffington Post reported. He also brought in a taxidermy grizzly bear and bobcat, per the Huffington Post.

Zinke is one of several cabinet leaders to come under scrutiny for his spending, particularly on air travel. He used military and private planes to attend events in Montana and the Caribbean islands.

 

http://talkingpoints...department-flag

So this asshole thinks that its just fine and dandy to decorate the office he goes to with animals, that are in decline, in many parts of the country, which they use to inhabit all over the country at one point-----------------and the purpose of this, is to treat these animals as trophies---------------------sick fuck


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#178
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,248 posts

No Cash Bail Movement Gains Momentum

 

https://nonprofitqua...gains-momentum/

 

Introduction:

 

In August, the Marshall Project reported that even while mounting an increasingly high-profile bail reform campaign, activists have been establishing bail funds to mitigate some of the damage done to poorer defendants pending those reforms. A study released in April documents the recent growth of this field and details some of its principles of practice and programming profiles.

 

Now, however, there appear to be intermediaries emerging that may help develop a more robust case for no-cash bail at the same time that they help with fundraising for and establishment of the funds.

 

As reports over the past week indicate, for instance, over the past two years Robin Steinberg has raised $30 million of a $50 million-dollar goal to seed local revolving bail funds for indigent defendants. Steinberg is the founder of the Bronx Freedom Fund, which has been bailing New Yorkers out for the past ten years and a former director of the Bronx Defenders, a free legal clinic.

 

The new national effort will be known as the Bail Project, and it plans to establish sites in St. Louis and Tulsa, Oklahoma early next year, then expanding to three dozen cities in the next five years. Thomas Harvey, executive director and co-founder of the nonprofit ArchCity Defenders law firm in St. Louis, is leaving to become The Bail Project’s national director of strategic relationships and advocacy.  The Bail Project goal “is to free 160,000 people in five years, in part by reusing the money in a revolving fund that’s replenished when a case is concluded and the bail is returned to the group.”

 

Bail is only one of a number of elements of the criminal justice system that disadvantage poor people, forcing them into far more jail time, guilty pleas, and convictions than a more well-off person would experience, but it is an important one. 

Bail_Bonds.jpg


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#179
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,248 posts

The Nation has also taken an interest of late in the implications for justice of our current bail system.  In an editorial from their November 20/27, 2017 issue:

 

 

Altogether, roughly 500,000 people are in jails across the country simply because they are poor.  These men and women haven't been found guilty of any crime.  Rather, most of them have been found guilty of low-level infractions that shouldn't be crimes at all and that often don't carry jail time.

 

Another point raised in the editorial relates to what some might call "identity" politics:

 

 

States and local governments, starved for revenues, turned to their own residents - especially low-income people of color - to subsidize everything from courts and prisons to private probation companies, piling on higher and higher fines and fees.

 

 

These facts on the ground force identity politics upon this country. If blacks and other minorities were treated with true justice, then complaints about "identity" politics might be well founded.  Unfortunately, as the editorial notes, that is not the reality we live in.  Also unfortunate is a judicial system that is staffed by conservative appointees who are increasingly deaf, dumb, and blind to the existence of such injustices.  Even to the Supreme Court making "factual" findings that are in truth counter-factual, and then overturning legislation based on these mythical findings. As is the case with the Court's weakening of voting rights legislation.   

 

Still, many otherwise progressive individuals in this forum gripe and complain about "identity" politics.  When such "identity" politics are nothing more than a request for simple justice, then they should be embraced.  Nor should dramatic differences on such issues between Democrats and Republicans be ignored with declarations as to how there is "no difference" between the two major parties.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#180
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,248 posts

Here is a article that fits in nicely with the points I have just made about an increasingly conservative judiciary. It is also a good follow-up to post #176 in this thread made by Wjfox.

 

The GOP’s Plan to Rule the Courts Until 2050

 

https://www.thedaily...urts-until-2050

 

Introduction:

 

(The Daily Beast) Mitch McConnell says his top goal as Senate leader is to remake the judiciary, a higher priority even than tax reform. He’s off to a terrifying start. Terrifying that is, if you’re not a conservative Republican.

 

Trump judges are getting rushed through the confirmation process at a record pace, and they’re super conservative on cultural issues, and mostly young. A lifetime appointment for someone in his or her thirties or forties is a gift that keeps on giving for three or four decades.

 

Brett Talley, a 36-year-old prolific blogger who has never tried a case, is the poster child for Trump’s conservative youth movement. Currently a deputy assistant attorney general at the Justice Department, he has been active on social media, expressing strongly partisan views about Hillary “Rotten” Clinton, and pledging fealty “financially, politically and intellectually” to the National Rifle Association a month after 20 children were gunned down in Newtown, Connecticut.

 

The Senate Judiciary Committee approved his nomination last week to become a federal district judge in his home state of Alabama. All 11 Republicans backed Talley despite questions about his qualifications and temperament, clearing the way for the full Senate to vote as early as this week despite the American Bar Association (ABA) rating him “not qualified.”

 

Dianne Feinstein, ranking Democrat on the committee, sought to slow down or possibly derail Talley’s confirmation with the revelation that he had not disclosed a potential conflict of interest on Senate forms. He is married to Ann Donaldson, chief of staff to White House counsel Donald McGahn. She has been interviewed as a witness in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of Donald Trump.

6469595-scales-of-justice-atop-legal-boo

 

Photo Credit:: https://www.123rf.co...cdrr12tvsilvlv|


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: America, USA, Politics, Military, Wars, Science, Information, News, Economy, Geopolitics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users