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Quantum Computing News and Discussions

quantum computing computing artificial intelligence D-Wave Alphabet deep learning quantum internet quantum quantum computer physics

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#1
wjfox

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Single atom stores quantum information

(PhysOrg.com) -- A data memory can hardly be any smaller: researchers working with Gerhard Rempe at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching have stored quantum information in a single atom. The researchers wrote the quantum state of single photons, i.e. particles of light, into a rubidium atom and read it out again after a certain storage time. This technique can be used in principle to design powerful quantum computers and to network them with each other across large distances.

Read more - http://www.physorg.c...ntum-limit.html

See also - http://www.nature.co...ature09997.html



nature09997-f3.2.jpg



#2
wjfox

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http://www.extremete...,2385665,00.asp

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May 20, 2011
By Sebastian Anthony

First Ever Commercial Quantum Computer Now Available for $10 Million

D-Wave Systems, after some 12 years of research, the accumulation of 60 patents, and the filing of 100 more, has finally released the world's first commercial quantum computer. The computer, which has been labelled with the wondrously adventurous name "D-Wave One", is outfitted with a 128-qubit (quantum bit) chipset that performs just a single task -- discrete optimization -- and costs $10,000,000 dollars.

The processor itself, which has the far cooler codename "Rainier," uses a process called quantum annealing to solve very specific problems. Quantum annealing is an exciting new topic which allows the "moulding and warping" of quantum particle energy levels on a scale far greater than any other approach. Quantum annealing enables the creation of integrated circuits -- processors -- that look and operate much like conventional silicon. The 128-qubit Rainier processor is so "conventional" that it can be programmed with the popular Python programming language.

The most exciting bit, though, is that quantum annealing allows scientists and researchers to observe what's actually going on. Historically, the problem with quantum computing is that observing the result is impossible -- to observe a quantum state is to destroy it -- which makes it rather hard to prove that qubits are actually performing as they should. D-Wave has pioneered a process that allows for quick, rapid "snapshotting" of Rainier's current state, which then become the frames of a movie. By watching the result, D-Wave can finally peer inside the quantum black box and begin to see whether quantum computing can deliver mathematically-provable results.

#3
FrostFuzz

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I've always been a bit skeptical about the feasibility of having computers run using quantum computing in the short term, but we can already put out a working quantum computer, even if it is little more than a novelty at this point, it is a great sign for the future of computing.

#4
Andy

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More on this:

Lockheed-Martin signs on for D-Wave prototype computer

Controversial Canadian company D-Wave, which has long made press claims about “commercial” quantum computing, can now claim to have sold a machine.

Even while debate still rages over whether its technology truly constitutes quantum computing, the company says that Lockheed-Martin is going to buy its D-Wave One machine for a rumoured US$10 million.

Exactly what the D-Wave One is, however, is still up in the air – as is the relationship between what its marketing department writes and what the company has actually built. For example, while the company describes the machine as offering 128 qubits of processing, other physicists say the D-Wave paper in Nature demonstrates only “non-classical effects” (ie, behaviours that appear to happen at a quantum scale) in an eight-qubit system.


More at The Register
For everyone's sake, watch this video

#5
wjfox

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First Quantum Computer With Quantum CPU And Separate Quantum RAM

Computer scientists have built a superconducting number cruncher with a Von Neumann architecture that paves the way for a new era of quantum computation

http://www.technolog...og/arxiv/27183/

#6
Unrequited Lust

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Interesting. But I still don't think quantum computing will be the next computing paradigm.

#7
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Interesting. But I still don't think quantum computing will be the next computing paradigm.


I agree with Lust.
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#8
Prolite

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Computer scientists have built a superconducting number cruncher with a Von Neumann architecture that paves the way for a new era of quantum computation.

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Back in 1946, the world's first general purpose electronic computer was switched on at the University of Pennsylvania. The huge processing power of ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer) stunned the world, or at least the few dozen people who had any idea what it was for and why it was important.

But ENIAC had an important flaw. It could only be programmed by resetting a myriad switches and dials, a task that could take weeks. And this seriously hindered the computer's flexibility.

The solution was not hard to find. it had already been outlined by Alan Turing, John Von Neumann and others: have a unit for number crunching and a separate electronic memory that could store instructions and data. That design meant that any reprogramming could be done relatively quickly, easily and electronically.

Today, almost all modern computers use this design, now known as the Von Neumann architecture.
The exception is the quantum computer. These devices use the strange properties of the quantum world to perform huge numbers of calculations in parallel. Consequently they have the potential to vastly outperform conventional number crunchers.
Unfortunately, physicists have only a vague and fleeting power over the quantum world and this means has prevented them the luxury of designing a Von Neumann-type quantum computer.

Until now. Today, Matteo Mariantoni at the UC Santa Barbara and pals reveal the first quantum computer with an information processing unit and a separate random access memory.

Their machine is a superconducting device that stores quantum bits or qubits as counter-rotating currents in a circuit (this allows the qubit to be both a 0 and 1 at the same time). These qubits are manipulated using superconducting quantum logic gates, transferred using a quantum bus and stored in separate microwave resonators.

Let's say upfront that the result is not a particularly powerful computer. Mariantoni and co show off their device by demonstrating a couple of simple but unspectacular algorithms but ones that were carefully chosen as the building blocks of more impressive tasks such as error correction and factoring large numbers.

Not that they've actually done any of those things. What's impressive, however, is that they soon could since this approach is eminently scalable. "Our results provide optimism for the near-term implementation of a larger-scale quantum processor based on superconducting circuits," say Mariantoni and co.

There has been no shortage of false dawns for quantum computing in the last 20 years or so. But it could that the Sun is about to rise on a new era of computation. If it does, everything that has gone before will one day seem as primitive as ENIAC seems to us.
Ref: arxiv.org/abs/1109.3743: Implementing the Quantum von Neumann Architecture with Superconducting Circuits


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#9
Unrequited Lust

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Still on page 1: http://www.futuretim...te-quantum-ram/

#10
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^Indeed. Merged =)
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#11
Prolite

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http://www.nanowerk....ewsid=23090.php "We are still at an early stage. The first quantum computers will appear in about 15 years. They will open up an entirely new field by multiplying the capacity to store and process information in very small sizes. Currently, one of the obstacles to their development is that the demonstrations that have been made were based on extremely bulky assemblies which entailed conditions that can only be reproduced in controlled laboratory environments", adds José Capmany. On the capabilities of quantum computing, the director of the UPV's ITEAM explains that it will allow for much faster calculations and for processing speeds that will make possible the resolution of problems whose complexity makes them unapproachable with today's classical computers. Its uses are many, from massive simulations in meteorology, climate, chemistry, genetics, etc., to new quantum security systems, which will generate completely indecipherable encrypted messages.
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#12
Unrequited Lust

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Interesting. The next computing paradigm could be very short if this comes to pass. The exponential growth of computing could be even faster under quantum computing.

#13
Prolite

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I am more excited about quantum computers than anything else, even more so than flying cars. Quantum computers could solve the hardest problems humanity faces, and will also play a key role in practically every area of life.
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#14
Craven

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Isn't that too optimistic? Isn't this "just" incredible increase in FLOPS? It may help to find prime numbers fast, it won't heal this planet.
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#15
Prolite

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Craven, why do you think quantum computers can ONLY be used to find prime numbers? They can be used for simulating biological systems, photonic systems, the universe, and etc... These factors are mentioned in news articles regarding quantum computers all the time. I read about it every day just about. Also, this is just one article. There have been many breakthroughs in the past 2 weeks. Just go to Google news and type in "quantum computing" and click "past 2 weeks" on the left-hand side under more tools.
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#16
Prolite

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It may help to find prime numbers fast, it won't heal this planet.


Computers have practically influenced almost every area of our lives. Computers are healing this planet, sort of speak. I don't understand why you don't see this??
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#17
Craven

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Oh I see this. :) All I'm saying is that more FLOPS don't fix world's problems. Faster and stronger computer may be helpful, no question about that. But it's just a stronger tool.
"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#18
Unrequited Lust

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Oh I see this. :) All I'm saying is that more FLOPS don't fix world's problems.
Faster and stronger computer may be helpful, no question about that. But it's just a stronger tool.

Software will inevitably catch up to it.

Today's fastest supercomputers can barely fold proteins (it takes months and months even at like 20 petaFLOPs). Figuring out how every protein folds would help soooooooooooo fucking much in medicine (especially cancer research). A standard quantum computer could fold a protein in minutes.

This is but one example. There are other biological processes that could be simulated, along with climate models, cosmological models, etc. Quantum computers would be invaluable.
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#19
GNR Rvolution

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Quantum computers are a massive leap forward in computing hardware and processing power, but you will need software that utilises that. Yes, software will catch up, but I think it will need a revolution in software design to keep up with the technological curve, otherwise software will rarely ever be able to harness the most recent hardware capability.
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#20
Unrequited Lust

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Quantum computers are a massive leap forward in computing hardware and processing power, but you will need software that utilises that. Yes, software will catch up, but I think it will need a revolution in software design to keep up with the technological curve, otherwise software will rarely ever be able to harness the most recent hardware capability.

Software advances exponentially too, just not as fast. Exponential growth provides the software "revolution" you speak of.

We have petaFLOP computers. Extrapolating FLOPS (I'll remind you that r^2 is over .98) in 30 years, have yottiFLOPS, which are a billion times faster than today's fastest supercomputers. Do we need a revolution to keep up with these expected extrapolations? Or does computer science naturally advance exponentially a la the law of accelerating returns?
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