Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

These ads will disappear if you register on the forum

Photo

Quantum Computing News and Discussions

quantum computing computing artificial intelligence D-Wave Alphabet deep learning quantum internet quantum quantum computer physics

  • Please log in to reply
201 replies to this topic

#181
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Nadsat Brat

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,133 posts
  • LocationAnur Margidda

University of Tokyo pair invent loop-based quantum computing technique

Japanese scientists have invented a new loop-based quantum computing technique that renders a far larger number of calculations more efficiently than existing quantum computers, allowing a single circuit to process more than 1 million qubits theoretically, as reported in Physical Review Letters.


  • Casey likes this
Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#182
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

Researchers change wavelengths of entangled photons to those used in telecommunications
September 26, 2017

Schematic of the emission of entangled photon pairs from a quantum dot. Credit: Sascha Kolatschek

The potential for photon entanglement in quantum computing and communications has been known for decades. One of the issues impeding its immediate application is the fact that many photon entanglement platforms do not operate within the range used by most forms of telecommunication.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...ations.html#jCp


  • Ghostreaper likes this

To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#183
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Nadsat Brat

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,133 posts
  • LocationAnur Margidda

With new Microsoft breakthroughs, general purpose quantum computing moves closer to reality

Microsoft’s plan to build a quantum computing ecosystem is based on Freedman’s field of math and a branch of physics so seemingly mystical its early pioneers invoked philosophy and spirituality to describe it, and its later disciples attracted funding and support from self-help gurus in the 1970s.  Even today, experts use terms like “magic state” to describe some elements of quantum computing theory and practice.
Although it evokes mystical comparisons, experts believe quantum computing will have innumerable practical benefits. That’s because it would allow scientists to do computations in minutes or hours that would take the lifetime of the universe on even the most advanced classical computers we use today. That, in turn, would mean that people could find answers to scientific questions previously thought unanswerable.
Researchers say quantum computing could eventually be used to solve some of the world’s toughest problems, from world hunger to the dangerous effects of climate change.
“A quantum computer is able to model nature,” said Krysta Svore, who has led development of Microsoft software designed to work on quantum computers, as well as the quantum simulators that allow development to proceed even while the first machines are being built. “With classical computers we’re not able to really understand those processes.”
In one of its earliest uses, experts believe a topological quantum computer will help artificial intelligence researchers speed up the labor-intensive process of training algorithms using machine learning.
Craig Mundie, who as Microsoft’s chief research and strategy officer first backed Freedman’s push into quantum computing a dozen years ago, noted that if a quantum computer could hypothetically process a training algorithm for the Cortana digital assistant in a day rather than a month, that would mark a profound improvement in AI advances.
“Even if everything else was the same, Cortana would improve 30 times faster,” said Mundie, who has continued to be deeply involved in the project.
For Freedman, to see a lifetime’s work in theoretical mathematics morph into an actual computing platform that could tackle previously unsolvable problems is “very intense.” After spending most of his career exploring theoretical math with no strings attached, it’s perhaps ironic that knots – or, more specifically, topology knot theory – is part of what led him to what he affectionately calls the first real job of his life, building a topological qubit.


Quantum computing experts will often note two things: That one of the best uses they see for a topological qubit is to develop better quantum computing technologies, and that one of the great pleasures of this kind of work is that you can’t predict what incredible advances it will produce.
When Mundie first backed Freedman’s research effort a dozen years ago, it was because he could envision getting to this point, where quantum theory would lead to engineering.
More than 50 years after Richard Feynman first pioneered the idea of quantum computing, Mundie is now looking ahead to the quantum economy that he believes this new type of computing will create. Just like classical computing has changed virtually every aspect of society, he thinks quantum computing will eventually help fuel revolutionary changes in almost everything, starting with chemistry, materials and machine learning.
“For the first time in 70 years we’re looking at a way to build a computing system that is just completely different,” he said. “It’s not an incremental tune-up or improvement. It’s a qualitatively different thing.”


  • Casey and Alislaws like this
Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#184
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Nadsat Brat

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,133 posts
  • LocationAnur Margidda

Google quantum computer test shows breakthrough is within reach

Google has big plans for quantum computing. The company has come up with a strategy for demonstrating quantum supremacy, the claim that quantum computers can perform tasks that no current computers can. While it’s widely assumed that we will eventually reach quantum supremacy, nobody has done it yet because current quantum computers can only run a small number of specialised algorithms.
Their plan is based on simulating coin flips. An ordinary computer does this by storing two numbers and choosing one of them at random each time. To simulate 50 coin tosses, it just selects 50 times in a row.
This is simple with regular coins, but if the coins behave like particles obeying the laws of quantum mechanics, things get more complicated.


  • Casey likes this
Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#185
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Nadsat Brat

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,133 posts
  • LocationAnur Margidda

Amazing!


  • Casey likes this
Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#186
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Nadsat Brat

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,133 posts
  • LocationAnur Margidda

Google Believes They Can Show "Quantum Supremacy" With Existing Tech for the First Time

“We are entering a new era on this planet."

Google is working on a computer that could unlock the true potential of artificial intelligence, and it may be ready to show its results in a matter of months. The team, Charles Neill at the University of California Santa Barbara and Pedram Roushan at Google, believe that they know how to show “quantum supremacy” for the first time — a quantum computer that is measurably better than a regular computer.
The Google team has been experimenting with nine superconducting qubits, with nine metal loops that have electrical current flowing in both directions. They were able to show that these qubits could represent 512 numbers all at once. It’s a small start, but the team believes they can scale it up from here.
“These results provide promising evidence that quantum supremacy may be achievable using existing technology,” the researchers told MIT Technology Review.

And to think the best we could do a century ago were purely mechanoanalogue machines that could only barely calculate binary numbers.


  • Casey likes this
Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#187
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Nadsat Brat

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,133 posts
  • LocationAnur Margidda

There's a New Quantum Material That Mimics Human Brains in an Unexpected Way

“[It] could represent the future of artificial intelligence – not because it retains vast amounts of data, but precisely because it doesn't.”

Scientists have discovered a quantum material that could represent the future of artificial intelligence – not because it retains vast amounts of data, but precisely because it doesn't.
The human brain is often singled out as being the most complex and powerful computer that scientists know of, and one of the mechanisms that enables this complexity is our ability to forget things – a phenomenon that can be mimicked in a material called samarium nickelate.
"The brain has limited capacity, and it can only function efficiently because it is able to forget," says one of the researchers, nanoscientist Subramanian Sankaranarayanan from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#188
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

IBM simulates 56 qubit quantum computer which is beyond 49 qubit limit
brian wang | October 21, 2017 |
Save

IBM now has a functional 56-qubit quantum computer simulated in a classical supercomputer. IBM simulated 56 qubits with only 4.5 terabytes.

It was previously believed that current supercomputers would not be able to simulate more that 49 qubits.

They divide the simulation task into many parallel pirces, which allowed them to use the many processors of a supercomputer simultaneously. thiis enabled the efficiency needed to simulate a 56-qubit quantum computer.

“IBM pushed the envelope,” says Itay Hen at the University of Southern California. “It’s going to be much harder for quantum-device people to exhibit [quantum] supremacy.”

 

https://www.nextbigf...ubit-limit.html


  • Casey and Yuli Ban like this

To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#189
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Nadsat Brat

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,133 posts
  • LocationAnur Margidda

Physics Boosts AI Methods

Researchers report the first application of quantum computing to a physics problem. By employing quantum-compatible machine learning techniques, they developed a method of extracting a rare Higgs boson signal from copious noise data, as reported in Nature.


  • Unity likes this
Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#190
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Nadsat Brat

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,133 posts
  • LocationAnur Margidda

Quantum computers should see rapid progress to millions of qubits

Just a few years ago, the consensus on a timeline to large-scale, reliable quantum computers was 20 years to never. This was in spite of the success that DWave systems had with adiabatic quantum computing systems.
“Nobody is saying never anymore,” says Scott Totzke, the chief executive of Isara Corp., a Canadian firm developing encryption resistant to quantum computers, which threaten to crack current methods. “We are in the very, very early days, but we are well past the science-fiction point.”
Google, IBM and some other companies have been spending tens of millions of dollars per year on quantum computing projects for several years.


  • Casey and rennerpetey like this
Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#191
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

IBM has 50 qubit prototype chip which should be close to Quantum Supremacy
brian wang | November 10, 2017 |
1Save

 

Quantum Supremacy is when quantum computers become faster than classical computers. Once Quantum Computers surpass classical computers they will continue to improve at a far more rapid pace. Doubling the transistors on a regular chip might achieve double the performance doubling the qubits on a quantum computer can provide an exponential speedup depending upon the kind of problem it is trying to solve. Dwave has shown speed ups of 10,000 time or more by doubling the qubits in their quantum annealing systems.

IBM Q scientists have successfully built and measured a 50 qubit processor prototype. Expanding on the 20 qubit architecture, it will be the next-gen IBM Q system. IBM aims to demonstrate capabilities beyond today’s classical systems with systems of this size.

Above – IBM 50Q System: An IBM cryostat wired for a 50 qubit system.

 

https://www.nextbigf...-supremacy.html


  • Casey likes this

To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#192
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

IBM says it's reached milestone in quantum computing
November 10, 2017 by The Associated Press

IBM has announced a milestone in its race against Google and other big tech firms to build a powerful quantum computer.

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...uantum.html#jCp


  • Casey likes this

To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#193
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

Essential quantum computer component downsized by two orders of magnitude
November 15, 2017

 

Qubits, or quantum bits, are the key building blocks at the heart of every quantum computer. In order to perform a computation, signals are directed to and from qubits. However, qubits are extremely sensitive to interference from their environment, and need to be shielded from outside signals, in particular from magnetic fields. It is a serious problem that the devices built to shield qubits from unwanted signals, known as nonreciprocal devices, produce magnetic fields themselves. Moreover, they are several centimeters in size, which is problematic, given that a large number of such elements is required in each quantum processor.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...nitude.html#jCp


  • Casey and Yuli Ban like this

To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#194
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

Dwave Systems has upgraded reverse annealing quantum system that is 150 times faster
brian wang | November 21, 2017 |
1Save

 

D-Wave Systems Inc., the world’s leader in quantum computing systems and software, announced major upgrades coming to the D-Wave 2000QTM quantum computer in the first quarter of 2018. Two of the most powerful new capabilities are reverse annealing and virtual graphs. These features enable significant performance improvements over the current D-Wave 2000Q system by giving users increased control of the quantum processing unit (QPU).

“With its expanding user base, D-Wave has had the opportunity to learn firsthand about new capabilities that would be useful to customers working on solving real world problems,” said Earl Joseph, CEO of Hyperion Research, “The combination of larger, more powerful quantum processors, enhanced user control over the quantum computation, and a growing list of software tools are all critical to advancing quantum computing. D-Wave is doing pioneering work in all of these areas.”

 

https://www.nextbigf...mes-faster.html


  • Casey likes this

To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#195
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

Japan launching quantum computer prototype likely based on quantum dot and photonics
brian wang | November 23, 2017 |
1

 

Japan has unveiled its first quantum computer prototype, amid a global race to build ever-more powerful machines with faster speeds and larger brute force that are key towards realizing the full potential of artificial intelligence.

Japan’s machine can theoretically make complex calculations 100 times faster than even a conventional supercomputer, but use just 1 kilowatt of power – about what is required by a large microwave oven – for every 10,000 kilowatts consumed by a supercomputer.

Above – Universal logic gates for quantum-dot electron-spin qubits using trapped quantum-well exciton polaritons
Author: Shruti Puri, Peter L. McMahon, and Yoshihisa Yamamoto Publication: Physical Review B Publisher: American Physical Society

 

https://www.nextbigf...-photonics.html


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#196
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

Interview on 5000 qubit quantum system and paths to general purpose quantum computers
brian wang | November 28, 2017 |
1

 

Nextbigfuture interviewed Bo Ewald who is D-Wave System’s President of International Business. Bo previously worked at Cray, Silicon Graphics and Los Alamos National Laboratory.

How does Quantum Annealing work ?

Imagine the solution to complex math and science problems are like a mountain landscape. The goal is to find the lowest valley.

The 2000 qubit annealers start with a quantum fog covering the mountains then the annealing removes the fog and the qubits move to lowest valley based on the input parameter qubits.

 

https://www.nextbigf...-computers.html


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#197
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

Superconducting qubit 3-D integration prospects bolstered by new research
November 29, 2017

 

Researchers from Google and the University of California Santa Barbara have taken an important step towards the goal of building a large-scale quantum computer.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...stered.html#jCp


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#198
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

Physicists set new record with 10-qubit entanglement
November 29, 2017 by Lisa Zyga feature

 

(Phys.org)—Physicists have experimentally demonstrated quantum entanglement with 10 qubits on a superconducting circuit, surpassing the previous record of nine entangled superconducting qubits. The 10-qubit state is the largest multiqubit entangled state created in any solid-state system and represents a step toward realizing large-scale quantum computing.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...lement.html#jCp


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#199
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

Key component for quantum computers miniaturized by 1000 times
brian wang | November 30, 2017 |
1
 

The Microwave circulator is a key part of many quantum computer implementations and researchers has been miniaturized by 1000 times. Making parts like these smaller will help enable quantum computers with millions of qubits.

Above – Lead author of the study, PhD candidate Alice Mahoney, in the quantum science laboratories at the Sydney Nanoscience Hub.

The Sydney team’s component, coined a microwave circulator, acts like a traffic roundabout, ensuring that electrical signals only propagate in one direction, clockwise or anti-clockwise, as required. Similar devices are found in mobile phone base-stations and radar systems, and will be required in large quantities in the construction of quantum computers. A major limitation, until now, is that typical circulators are bulky objects the size of your hand.

They used the properties of topological insulators to slow the speed of light in the material. This miniaturization paves the way for many circulators to be integrated on a chip and manufactured in the large quantities that will be needed to build quantum computers.

The work to scale-up quantum computing is driving breakthroughs in related areas of electronics and nanoscience.

 

https://www.nextbigf...1000-times.html


  • Casey likes this

To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#200
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,721 posts

Google and UCSB achieve 3D integration of Superconducting qubits
brian wang | November 30, 2017 |
1Save

 

Researchers from Google and the University of California Santa Barbara have taken an important step towards the goal of building a large-scale quantum computer.

Writing in the journal Quantum Science and Technology, they present a new process for creating superconducting interconnects, which are compatible with existing superconducting qubit technology.

The race to develop the first large-scale error-corrected quantum computer is extremely competitive, and the process itself is complex. Whereas classical computers encode data into binary digits (bits) that exist in one of two states, a quantum computer stores information in quantum bits (qubits) that may be entangled with each other and placed in a superposition of both states simultaneously.

 

https://www.nextbigf...ing-qubits.html


  • rennerpetey likes this

To follow my work on tropical cyclones






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: quantum computing, computing, artificial intelligence, D-Wave, Alphabet, deep learning, quantum internet, quantum, quantum computer, physics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users