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The Technism/Vyrdism Discussion Thread

technism Vyrdism postcapitalism automation technotariat proletariat John Henry Vyrd post scarcity artificial intelligence robotics

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#61
caltrek

caltrek

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...and even without new legislation:

 

 

Family Business Sells Ohio Grocery Chain to Its 2,100 Employees

 

https://nonprofitqua...2100-employees/

 

Extract:

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) Based in Wooster, Ohio, after 88 years in operation, family-owned Buehler’s Fresh Foods, a small supermarket chain that operates 13 stores and employs 2,100 people, is selling the business to its employees, reports Gabrielle Pickard-Whitehead of Small Business Trends. The company will be owned by an employee stock ownership plan (ESOP) company, a form of business organization, which, as NPQ covered earlier this month, allows employees to acquire ownership that is held in a trust through a form of 401(k) retirement account contributions.

 

…In Supermarket News, company president Dan Buehler said:

 

Our generation of Buehlers are reaching retirement age, and we think this a better option than selling the business to outsiders. We want these supermarkets to be here serving customers and providing good jobs well into the future. There’s no one better qualified than our own employees to carry on that mission.

 

Pickard-Whitehead notes the broader importance of the sale from the standpoint of the nation’s millions of small business owners: “By selling its stores to its employees, who are already familiar with the business, this is an example of how it can make sense for small businesses to sell internally rather than to an outside buyer.” She also observes that “selling a company to your workers demonstrates a level of loyalty and trust between ownership and employees not often seen in business.”

 

Pickard-Whithead adds, “Selling the stores to employees means the 2,100 Buehler’s Fresh Foods workers will be able to keep their job. For a small business, selling a company internally comes with many benefits, including not having to find, recruit and train new staff.” Other benefits of employee ownership she cites include increased staff loyalty and greater productivity.

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#62
caltrek

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NYC Nonprofits Use Land Trusts, Co-ops to Satisfy Residents’ Economic Needs Post Sandy

 

https://nonprofitqua...eds-post-sandy/

 

Extract:

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) A nonprofit community development financial institution (CDFI), The Working World, and Occupy Sandy started Worker-Owned Rockaway Cooperatives (WORCs) in spring 2013.

 

As Anderson writes, the co-op development effort aims:

 

to assist people in Far Rockaway and the surrounding area with opening cooperative businesses or converting existing businesses to worker-owned cooperatives. Working World, an NYC-headquartered nonprofit that helps to build worker-cooperative businesses in low-income communities, provided free business development training and ongoing technical assistance, in addition to non-extractive financing.

 

Part of what makes this effort unique is what Anderson calls “non-extractive” financing. What this means is that rather than a traditional loan, a royalty mechanism is used, by which the business pays more to the lender if the business succeeds but pays nothing if it fails. As Alex Peters from The Working World explains, “repayment only comes from profits, which means we are aligned with the business in seeking success.”

 

Anderson reports that to date, Rockaway organizers have launched three co-op businesses, and “they also facilitated the conversion of an existing business that was going to close because its owner decided to retire.” Anderson says that The Rockaways co-ops currently employ 13 people, with a new childcare co-op in development. All co-ops in the network have a vote on WORC’s governing board, which makes decisions about which projects to support and how to fund them.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#63
caltrek

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Erowind found this article and posted it as a status update.

 

Puerto Rico turns to socialist and anarchist collectives to rebuild

 

https://boingboing.n...king-point.html

 

Introduction:

 

Disaster capitalism depends on the idea that "There is No Alternative" and that the populace can only sit by passively while their infrastructure, government, homes and schools are hijacked and sold off to low-bidder corporations to financially engineer and then extract rent from.

 

That's certainly the model that started to play out after Hurricane Maria, when Trumpist cronies were handed sweetheart deals and the people were left to die in droves while captains of industry carved up the loot.

 

But the populace need not be a flock of sheep waiting passively for the shear: instead, they can rise up and take care of themselves, through systems of solidarity and mutual aid, and that's what's happening in Puerto Rico, where Molly Crabapple reports on the smashing success of anarchists and socialists whose collectives are filling in the humanitarian relief that has been denied to them by Trump's incompetent state and the shareholder firms who are more interested in their bottom lines than the human lives they are being paid to ease.

 

So you've got the radical black feminists of Taller Salud, rebuilding homes in Loíza; Colectiva Feminista en Construcción, handing out "food, supplies, and money for tarps"; there's the punks of Santurce's El Local, feeding 600 people a day from a community kitchen; and many others -- often these groups date back to the incompetent bungling of the Hurricane Irma relief, and have gone from strength to strength, forging ties with the diaspora in Miami and New York, showing people that there is an alternative.

 

Two weeks after Hurricane Maria hit, aid remained a bureaucratic quagmire, mismanaged by FEMA, the FBI, the US military, the laughably corrupt local government. The island looked as if it were stuck somewhere between the nineteenth century and the apocalypse. But leftists, nationalists, socialists—Louisa Capetillo’s sons and daughters—were stepping up to rebuild their communities

crabapple2-caguas-kitchen.jpg


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#64
caltrek

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Can Employee Ownership Hold Back a Tsunami of Small Business Closures?

 

https://nonprofitqua...iness-closures/

 

Introduction:

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) To paraphrase John Oliver, it is hard to find two words in the English language more likely to put you to sleep than “business succession.” Oliver famously made that claim for “net neutrality,” but the phrase “business succession” might be even more mind-numbingly boring.

 

And yet, a business succession crisis that could cause millions to lose their jobs is looming. Nearly half of US small business owners are baby boomers, aged 53 to 71. Many are likely to retire soon. Collectively, according to the Oakland, California-based nonprofit Project Equity, baby boomers own 2.34 million businesses, employ 24.7 million people, and have combined annual sales of $5.14 trillion. It is estimated that 80 percent of these businesses lack a plan for what they are going to do when their owner retires or, if misfortune falls, dies unexpectedly.

 

In short, people’s livelihoods across the nation are at stake—not because of the usual culprits, such as globalization or automation, but for the simple reason that hundreds of thousands of companies are likely to shut down due to a failure to develop adequate business succession plans. The impending mass retirement of baby boomers has been labeled by some a silver tsunami.

 

The usual business succession paths are to pass the business on to your children, sell to a competitor, or sell to private equity, but, as an article in Forbes noted a few years ago, “Only a third of all family businesses successfully make the transition to the second generation.”

 

One option that’s increasingly being used, however, involves transferring ownership to employees. It has a lot to recommend it. For one, it dramatically increases the chance of business survival, preserving community jobs in the process. This fall, an Ohio-based grocery chain that employs 2,100 was saved from oblivion using this mechanism.


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: technism, Vyrdism, postcapitalism, automation, technotariat, proletariat, John Henry Vyrd, post scarcity, artificial intelligence, robotics

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