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Autonomous Vehicles News and Discussions

Tesla autonomous vehicles self-driving cars passenger drones AVs Google Uber Autopilot driverless car self-driving truck

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#21
Italian Ufo

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I think I will loose the freedom feeling that one have when it drives the cars..but on the other hand in the morning i would like to phone my car and it will come to pick me up downstair and drive me to work while it drives me to work

#22
skiier4384

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http://www.cnn.com/2....html?hpt=hp_t1

Self-Driving Cars are officially legal in California.
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#23
Time_Traveller

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http://www.cnn.com/2....html?hpt=hp_t1

Self-Driving Cars are officially legal in California.


Can't wait until there in the UK and then i can drive or should i say don't drive one. :D
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#24
GenX

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I could't find a dedicated thread for this so I figured it was past time to start one.  This is one of my top-five future technologies that I am most excited about.  I know that Google is supposed to be working on this.  My guess was that Mercedes would have the first, since they have a history of coming out with the most cutting edge innovations on their S-Class before anyone else (ABS, air bags, etc.).  However, if Google got together with Tesla then perhaps they'd be able to develop something first.  Right now there are various pieces of technology available but they are scattered among different car companies.  Ford has the new auto parking feature where the car can go park itself after it lets you off at the entrance to your destination, Mercedes and many others have laser guided cruise control that stops the car if you get too close to the car in front of you, and now Audi is coming out with an interesting new technology.  It doesn't say in the article that this is intended to on day be used in self-driving cars but it's pretty easy to imagine that as the next logical step.

 

https://autos.yahoo....20299.html?vp=1

 

How Audi's new tech times your driving with traffic lights

 

What if your car displayed the precise speed you needed to drive in order to hit every green light? And what if that same system told you when the light was about to change color?

That's the future, according to Audi. And with beta testing in full force, it's a future that's rapidly approaching.{C}

At this year's Consumer Electronics Show, Audi revealed its "Traffic Light Recognition Technology" and offered brief demonstrations around the streets of Las Vegas. We sampled a very pre-production version last June in Berlin, and were initially impressed.

 

It works by utilizing Audi's in-car 4G cellular data link to establish a connection between the car and a city's traffic light network. As you arrive within the vicinity of a light, it tells you [font="Cambria;font-size:12pt;"]–[/font] via the car's infotainment screen [font="Cambria;font-size:12pt;"]–[/font] how fast you need to travel in order to skate through on green, as well as a timer displaying when the light will change color. This, according to Audi, would not only save time but also fuel [font="Cambria;font-size:12pt;"]–[/font] as well as a possible 15 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions. By potentially reducing red-light runners, making drivers less likely to get caught in a yellow-to-red transition, there could be a safety benefit too.

If you're waiting at a stoplight, you will receive the aforementioned countdown to green while the system interacts with the car's start-stop function, bringing the motor back to life five seconds before the light changes.

Testing continues in Las Vegas using 50 sets of lights. In Verona, Italy, a further 60 traffic lights are being utilized for beta testing, while in Berlin, Germany, 25 Audi customers are evaluating the system using 1,000 traffic lights. According to an Audi press release, "A market launch is currently the subject of intense analysis in the United States," and that the system is "fully

functional" and ready to be fitted to every Audi in the current range.

 

Of course this remains subject to government legislation; Audi would need permission to connect to each city's traffic light network before it could implement the technology into production. As the German automaker told Yahoo Autos, that will "certainly require more time," but that the concept could become a reality in the "near term."

 

When it does, count us in. We'll see if we can beat the Manhattan driver who managed 55 straight green lights, recorded while cruising New York at 3am.


Edited by Yuli Ban, 26 June 2017 - 09:41 PM.
Merged with older threads to create a general dedicated thread

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#25
Yuli Ban

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When 5G and 6G becomes the norm, I can see this becoming better refined.


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#26
Monoceros

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What's the status of the driverless car project by Google ?  Anyone know what issues they still have (if any) ?



#27
GenX

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[font="calibri;"]Actually, AP had an article yesterday:[/font]

 

[font="calibri;"]5 Things to Know about Google’s Self-Driving Cars[/font]

[font="calibri;"]Justin Pritchard, Associated Press[/font]

[font="calibri;"]Apr 28, 2014[/font]

 

[font="calibri;"]The director of Google’s self-driving car project wrote in a blog post Monday that development of the technology has entered a new stage: trying to master driving on city streets. Many times more complex than freeways, which the cars can now reliably navigate, city streets represent a huge challenge.[/font]

[font="calibri;"]Here are five things to know about the cars, and their future:[/font]

 

  • [font="calibri;"]City streets are far trickier.[/font]

[font="calibri;"]Google says its cars have now driven about 700,000 accident-free miles on freeways in “autonomous mode” — with the car in control, though a safety driver sits behind the wheel. That’s the equivalent of about 120 San Francisco-to-Manhattan-to-San Francisco road trips.[/font]

[font="calibri;"]With that success, Google has been focusing on city driving for about the past year. Freeways are relatively simple for the cars — no blind corners, no cyclists, and no pedestrians. City streets have all that and more, including intersections and complex interactions with other drivers, such as who goes first at a four-way stop.[/font]

 

  • [font="calibri;"]Google has adjusted its car tech.[/font]

[font="calibri;"]Google says that in the past year, the Lexus RX450H SUVs it has retrofitted with lasers, radar, and cameras rapidly learned how to handle thousands of urban driving situations. The robot’s vision can now “read” stop signs (rather than rely on a map to plot them out) and differentiate between hundreds of objects in real time. It also can negotiate construction zones much more reliably.[/font]

[font="calibri;"]But the technology is far from perfect. Improvements are needed in merging and lane changes, turning right on red, and handling bad weather.[/font]

 

[font="calibri;"]3. You probably won’t see them on your block.[/font]

[font="calibri;"]Not in the near future — unless you live in Mountain View, Calif., where Google is located. So far, the tech giant has focused on street driving in its hometown, which it has mapped parts of in tremendous detail. The mapping helps the car’s computer make sense of its environment and focus on moving parts — other cars, cyclists, and pedestrians.[/font]

[font="calibri;"]Just four states — California, Nevada, Florida, and Michigan — and Washington, D.C., have formally opened public streets to testing of self-driving cars, though testing is probably legal nearly everywhere (because it is not expressly banned).[/font]

 

[font="calibri;"]4. You may be driving one sooner than you think.[/font]

[font="calibri;"]In 2012, Google co-founder Sergey Brin predicted that the public would be able to get the technology within five years. Google isn’t revising that date. Initially, drivers would be expected to take control if the computer fails. Eventually, the vision goes, there would be no need for a person in the driver’s seat — or at least not a person who has to watch the road.[/font]

 

[font="calibri;"]5. Google probably won’t make the car itself.[/font]

[font="calibri;"]While Google has enough money to invest in making cars, that likelihood is remote. More likely options include collaborating with major carmakers or giving away the software, as Google did with its Android operating system.[/font]

[font="calibri;"]Meanwhile, traditional automakers are developing driverless cars of their own. Renault-Nissan’s CEO said he hopes to deliver a model to the public by 2020.[/font]


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#28
jamesgera

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what do you think the future car will look like. 

if the car is self derivable what will we do.

could we sit back and watch TV on the TV in the car ? could we sleep or do we have to pay attention like we do today.

also could cars pick us up. say you are out and you won't to go home could you ring your car and it would come and collect you like a taxi.

 

also what will it be like at the start. between the self driving cars and non self driving cars will this course a problem. these cars communicate with each other so a car driven by a person could be more risky.



#29
GenX

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Awesome Volvo!

 

 

Volvo Begins Testing Self-Driving Cars on Public Roads
Anthony Cuthbertson, IB Times
May 6, 2014

 

Volvo has begun testing its self-driving cars on public roads in what the Swedish car manufacturer hopes will be the world’s first large-scale fleet of autonomous vehicles.

The driverless cars were tested by Volvo on roads around Gothenburg, Sweden, as part of the company’s Drive Me project, which was announced last December.

“The test cars are now able to handle lane following, speed adaption, and merging traffic all by themselves,” said Erik Coelingh, a technical specialist at Volvo.

“This is an important step towards our aim that the final Drive Me cars will be able to drive the whole test route in highly autonomous mode.”

The technology, referred to by Volvo as Autopilot, allows drivers to hand over all driving functions to the onboard computer.

 

Similar technology is currently being developed by other car manufacturers, including Nissan, Ford, and Tesla.

Other companies have also moved into the space. Google has already racked up thousands of test miles on the streets around its California headquarters, while Nokia announced in a statement yesterday that it had launched a $100 million fund to invest in smart cars.

Volvo’s own plans involve the introduction of 100 autonomous cars on a 50-kilometer route in Gothenburg by 2017, with the hope that the introduction of such vehicles will help improve road safety and reduce congestion.

“That Volvo Cars’ hometown of Gothenburg becomes the world’s first arena for self-driving cars in everyday driving conditions demonstrates both our technological leadership and Sweden’s dedication to pioneering the integration of self-driving vehicles,” Coelingh said.

“This public pilot will provide us with a valuable insight into the societal benefits of making autonomous vehicles a natural part of the traffic environment.”


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#30
Bradley

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Some of the resistance I've heard regarding autonomous cars is that 'driving is fun'. So, forget about the deaths, injuries, traffic congestion, pollution and the huge cost of building cars to survive impacts….because driving is fun. 

 

However, I'm glad Google publicized their efforts so people have years to grow accustomed to the idea. Five years should be long enough so that when the cars are finally in the showroom people will say, "finally, what the hell took so long". 



#31
MarcZ

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This belongs more generally in the Technology of the Future section of the forum than news. I am also surprised that you haven't found dedicated posts for this topic on this site I seem to think we cover this topic quite a lot actually. >.>



#32
Ghostreaper

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The argument 'Driving is fun' does have some merit tbf, I thoroughly enjoy driving on some roads and it's fairly obvious millions of other people do as well. The times and places that driving is not fun however are places like cities and motorways/interstates where there is either congestion due to driver error or just tediousness. I think that having places like these be 'Autonomous vehicles only' (similar to i-robot's underground highways) would be a good place to start.

 

It could also open up the idea of far higher speed limits on motorways due to fully autonomous systems.


“If the genius of invention were to reveal to-morrow the secret of immortality, of eternal beauty and youth, for which all humanity is aching, the same inexorable agents which prevent a mass from changing suddenly its velocity would likewise resist the force of the new knowledge until time gradually modifies human thought.” 

 

                                                                 Nikola Tesla - New York World, May 19th 1907 


#33
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'Car is more cautious around train tracks.' http://www.businessw...sed-kill-button



#34
Bradley

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The argument 'Driving is fun' does have some merit tbf, I thoroughly enjoy driving on some roads and it's fairly obvious millions of other people do as well. The times and places that driving is not fun however are places like cities and motorways/interstates where there is either congestion due to driver error or just tediousness. I think that having places like these be 'Autonomous vehicles only' (similar to i-robot's underground highways) would be a good place to start.

 

It could also open up the idea of far higher speed limits on motorways due to fully autonomous systems.

 

As long as vehicle to vehicle and vehicle to network tech was mandated I wouldn't have a problem with manual drivers outside the cities. But that would make manual driving less fun because people would get dinged every time they violated a traffic law. 



#35
Italian Ufo

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I wonder how many will trust to have a self driving car.



#36
tornado64

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I wonder how many will trust to have a self driving car.

 

When it's publicly available it will be better than every human driver...



#37
GenX

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Driving will have to be reserved for virtual reality in the future.  There are too many safety benefits to self driving cars that they will eventually win out over however many hardcore driving enthuasists try to prevent it.  Maybe somewhere like Vegas will be reserved for a spot where you can still rent and drive your own car, or maybe even a country or two will keep it legal, but by and large driving your own car will be illegal within 100 years, and maybe as soon as 35 depending on how fast the technology progresses.


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#38
tornado64

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I think it will be like this. 

At some point you won't need a driver's license anymore to use an automated car. Then the majority of people will not have driver's licenses anymore and the places where you can get these will start to disappear. The steering wheel will then also disappear completely in cars. So yeah, you don't have to make it illegal, you just won't be able to drive yourself at some point. Car driving will have it's place as a sport I think. I don't see car races disappear.



#39
Italian Ufo

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. Car driving will have it's place as a sport I think. I don't see car races disappear.

 

I think people will still enjoy driving in the future. it gives a sense of control and this kind of sense is very pleasurable for humans psychologically speaking.  Many people will still drive in the future even when we will have self-driving cars.



#40
Bradley

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The two initial markets for autonomous vehicles are long haul trucking (city to city) and rich people. Elderly rich people who have had their drivers license revoked will be all over autonomous cars.

 

After that, companies like FedEx and UPS will adopt autonomous vehicles even though they still contain drivers to carry the package to the door. UPS, for example, has a policy that drivers should always 'turn right' because they determined right hand turns save fuel, reduce accidents, and delivers the package in just about the same amount of time. If UPS can control the exact details of driving through autonomous systems they will be all over it. And they have the money to pull it off.

 

Then we will see adoption by regular people as prices drop. Finally, we will see vehicle drones (no drivers) start to take over the commercial trucking and delivery segments. The Internet of Things will tell the grocery store when you are home so that it can coordinate delivery. The truck will drive up, a robot will crawl out and run your groceries up to your front door. 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Tesla, autonomous vehicles, self-driving cars, passenger drones, AVs, Google, Uber, Autopilot, driverless car, self-driving truck

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