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Exoplanets - worlds of other suns


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#441
Sciencerocks

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15 new planets confirmed around cool dwarf stars
March 12, 2018, Tokyo Institute of Technology

 

A research team led by Teruyuki Hirano of Tokyo Institute of Technology's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences has validated 15 exoplanets orbiting red dwarf systems. One of the brightest red dwarfs, K2-155 that is around 200 light years away from Earth, has three transiting super-Earths. Of those three super-Earths, the outermost planet, K2-155d, with a radius 1.6 times that of Earth, could be within the host star's habitable zone.

 

The researchers found that K2-155d could potentially have liquid water on its surface based on three-dimensional global climate simulations. Hirano says, "In our simulations, the atmosphere and the composition of the planet were assumed to be Earth-like, and there's no guarantee that this is the case."

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...-stars.html#jCp



#442
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K2-229b is a very dense planet in a multiple planet system.

An Earth-sized exoplanet with a Mercury-like composition
https://www.nature.c...1550-018-0420-5

This tweet thread has more graphics and information.
https://twitter.com/...308332976066560


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#443
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K2-229b is a very dense planet in a multiple planet system.

An Earth-sized exoplanet with a Mercury-like composition
https://www.nature.c...1550-018-0420-5

This tweet thread has more graphics and information.
https://twitter.com/...308332976066560

Is it near the habitable zone?



#444
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Very close to its star.

 

 

In fact, the system was detected by Kepler through the method of planetary transits (occultations similar to eclipses). Of all the "bodies" found, the most striking by far was K2-229b, since it had the size of the Earth, but a composition similar to that of Mercury.

The study, published in the journal Nature Astronomy , shows that K2-229b orbits much closer to its star than does Mercurio del Sol, and its 'daytime' temperature can reach 2,330 K. According to Barrado for AgenciaSinc :

    This proximity possibly causes its mantle, the outermost part of the planet, to volatilize and form an atmosphere of silicate vapors. An alternative explanation would be the impact with large asteroids, analogous to what happened to the Earth when the Moon formed.

 

https://translate.go...29b&prev=search


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#445
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What I love about the internet right now.

 

TRAPPIST-1 system may have too much water to support life

http://www.astronomy...to-support-life

 

 

Hope was ignited in the science community when researchers discovered that three of the seven Earth-size planets orbiting TRAPPIST-1, a cool red dwarf about 40 light-years from Earth, are within the star’s habitable zone and could have flowing water on their surfaces. But while the presence of water undoubtedly increases the likelihood of habitability for these planets, it doesn’t automatically make them safe havens for life. In fact, an overabundance of water suggests just the opposite, and new research conducted by scientists at Arizona State and Vanderbilt Universities indicates that the TRAPPIST-1 system actually has too much water to support life.

 

BUT WAIT, THERE'S MORE

 

The lead author of the paper saw this linked on reddit, and did an AMA there.

 

https://www.reddit.c..._to_be/dwfxj85/


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The Prophet (saw) said: He who does not thank the people is not thankful to Allah.

#446
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If there's too much water = the solar winds sure as fuck aint powerful enough to rip off a atmosphere of earth massed planets. ;) That is the way I see it.

 

I believe life can and will develop in such oceans! ;) We don't have enough understanding of our universe and we're hardly even starting to chip the surface of the new questions that have been brought up!



#447
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OGLE-2017-BLG-0482Lb: A Microlensing Super-Earth Orbiting a Low-mass Host Star
https://arxiv.org/abs/1803.10830

   

We report the discovery of a planetary system in which a super-earth orbits a late M-dwarf host. The planetary system was found from the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2017-BLG-0482, wherein the planet signal appears as a short-term anomaly to the smooth lensing light curve produced by the host. Despite its weak signal and short duration, the planetary signal was firmly detected from the dense and continuous coverage by three microlensing surveys. We find a planet/host mass ratio of q∼1.4×10−4. We measure the microlens parallax πE from the long-term deviation in the observed lensing light curve, but the angular Einstein radius θE cannot be measured because the source trajectory did not cross the planet-induced caustic. Using the measured event timescale and the microlens parallax, we find that the masses of the planet and the host are Mp=9.0+9.0−4.5 M⊕ and Mhost=0.20+0.20−0.10 M⊙, respectively, and the projected separation between them is a⊥=1.8+0.6−0.7 au. The estimated distance to the lens is DL=5.8+1.8−2.1 kpc. The discovery of the planetary system demonstrates that microlensing provides an important method to detect low-mass planets orbiting low-mass stars.

 



#448
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Independent Discovery of a Sub-Earth in the Habitable Zone Around a Very Close Solar-Mass Star
Michael B. Lund, Robert J. Siverd, Ponder Stibbons
(Submitted on 2 Apr 2018)

    With the wealth of planets that have been discovered over the past ∼ 20 years, the field can broadly be divided into two regimes. For understanding broad occurrence and formation rates, large numbers of planets allow for population statistics to be calculated, and this work preferentially tends towards fainter planets (and fainter host stars) to allow for a large number of detections. The second regime is the detailed understanding of a single planet, with particular consideration to planetary structure and atmosphere, and in this case benefits from finding individual planets (and host stars) that are very close, and subsequently, very bright. The closest of these also provide very novel possibilities for exploration if they are close enough that travel time to them is relatively low, something that would be extremely unlikely for more distant planets. Here, we announce the independent discovery of a sub-earth planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a very close solar-mass star using a novel processing technique and observations from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT)

 

https://arxiv.org/abs/1804.00419
 

 

In this paper we have demonstrated how the fraction of saturated pixels can be used to de-tect the presence of very bright, and very close,planets. In particular, we provide an indepen-dent confirmation of a sub-Earth in the habit-able zone of a 1M star using this technique. The planet we detect is in an orbit with a semi-major axis of 1.54 AU, and the star that it is orbiting is located extremely close to the Earth.

 



#449
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Independent Discovery of a Sub-Earth in the Habitable Zone Around a Very Close Solar-Mass Star
Michael B. Lund, Robert J. Siverd, Ponder Stibbons
(Submitted on 2 Apr 2018)

    With the wealth of planets that have been discovered over the past ∼ 20 years, the field can broadly be divided into two regimes. For understanding broad occurrence and formation rates, large numbers of planets allow for population statistics to be calculated, and this work preferentially tends towards fainter planets (and fainter host stars) to allow for a large number of detections. The second regime is the detailed understanding of a single planet, with particular consideration to planetary structure and atmosphere, and in this case benefits from finding individual planets (and host stars) that are very close, and subsequently, very bright. The closest of these also provide very novel possibilities for exploration if they are close enough that travel time to them is relatively low, something that would be extremely unlikely for more distant planets. Here, we announce the independent discovery of a sub-earth planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a very close solar-mass star using a novel processing technique and observations from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT)

 

https://arxiv.org/abs/1804.00419
 

 

In this paper we have demonstrated how the fraction of saturated pixels can be used to de-tect the presence of very bright, and very close,planets. In particular, we provide an indepen-dent confirmation of a sub-Earth in the habit-able zone of a 1M star using this technique. The planet we detect is in an orbit with a semi-major axis of 1.54 AU, and the star that it is orbiting is located extremely close to the Earth.

 

 

Why doesn't the paper say which star?!



#450
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I have no idea why they didn't name the star. It is weird.

 

 

Astronomers discover a 'super-Earth' exoplanet orbiting a low-mass star
April 4, 2018 by Tomasz Nowakowski, Phys.org report

Using microlensing method, an international team of astronomers has detected a new "super-Earth" alien world circling a low-mass star about five times less massive than our sun. The finding is detailed in a paper published March 28 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

Based on the gravitational lens effect, the microlensing method is mainly used to detect planetary and stellar-mass objects regardless of the light they emit. Hence, this technique is therefore sensitive to the mass of the objects, especially to low-mass planets like "super-Earths." The so-called "super-Earths" are extrasolar worlds with a mass higher than that of our home planet, but substantially below the masses of the solar system's gas giants.

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...w-mass.html#jCp



#451
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KPS-1b: the first transiting exoplanet discovered using an amateur astronomer's wide-field CCD data
Artem Burdanov, Paul Benni, Eugene Sokov, Vadim Krushinsky, Alexander Popov, Laetitia Delrez, Michael Gillon, Guillaume Hébrard, Magali Deleuil, Paul A. Wilson, Olivier Demangeon, Özgür Baştürk, Erika Pakštiene, Iraida Sokova, Sergei A. Rusov, Vladimir V. Dyachenko, Denis A. Rastegaev, Anatoliy Beskakotov, Alessandro Marchini, Marc Bretton, Stan Shadick, Kirill Ivanov
(Submitted on 16 Apr 2018)

 

    We report the discovery of the transiting hot Jupiter KPS-1b. This exoplanet orbits a V=13.0 K1-type main-sequence star every 1.7 days, has a mass of 1.090+0.086−0.087 MJup and a radius of 1.03+0.13−0.12 RJup. The discovery was made by the prototype Kourovka Planet Search (KPS) project, which used wide-field CCD data gathered by an amateur astronomer using readily available and relatively affordable equipment. Here we describe the equipment and observing technique used for the discovery of KPS-1b, its characterization with spectroscopic observations by the SOPHIE spectrograph and with high-precision photometry obtained with 1-m class telescopes. We also outline the KPS project evolution into the Galactic Plane eXoplanet survey (GPX). The discovery of KPS-1b represents a new major step of the contribution of amateur astronomers to the burgeoning field of exoplanetology.

 

https://arxiv.org/abs/1804.05551






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