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Exoplanets - worlds of other suns


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#41
tornado64

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I think over the next years we will find many exoplanets who are very earth-like. There should be thousands alone in our galaxy. But, I'm not sure whether that brings us a closer to find life. It may hard, if there is life, but no higher lifeforms or civilizations, to explore it from so far away.

#42
Logically Irrational

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I think over the next years we will find many exoplanets who are very earth-like. There should be thousands alone in our galaxy.
But, I'm not sure whether that brings us a closer to find life. It may hard, if there is life, but no higher lifeforms or civilizations, to explore it from so far away.


Undertakings like Kepler mainly do probabilities. It gets us closer to finding life in the sense that it narrows our search, and gives us a better idea of where to go once we have probes to explore the planets on location.

If you're talking about outright confirmation of life, right now, SETI has more of a chance, but that's just because confirmation really isn't what telescopic observation is used for.
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#43
Craven

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Two nice reads from io9: http://io9.com/59185...rs-have-planets This one just confirms insane abundance of planets in universe. http://io9.com/59191...anity-is-doomed An this one is about consequences of above statement. What does it say about Drake's equation and Fermi paradox? Are we doomed like all other lifeforms?
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#44
Raklian

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Two nice reads from io9: http://io9.com/59185...rs-have-planets This one just confirms insane abundance of planets in universe. http://io9.com/59191...anity-is-doomed An this one is about consequences of above statement. What does it say about Drake's equation and Fermi paradox? Are we doomed like all other lifeforms?


There is only one way to find out - to explore our galaxy and find out if the Fermi paradox has any basis.
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#45
Logically Irrational

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From xkcd:

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Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn!

#46
Raklian

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Oh, so many planets to exploit. *rubbing hands in excitement*
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#47
Craven

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ALL THESE WORLDS ARE YOURS — EXCEPT EUROPA. ATTEMPT NO LANDINGS THERE.

Edited by Craven, 20 June 2012 - 06:17 PM.

"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#48
Logically Irrational

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Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer, do...
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#49
tornado64

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The thing is, even if we know other earthlike planets are there, they will be too far... we can't even travel with 1% of lightspeed and the galaxy is just too damn big. So I think over the next time we will slowly explore our solar system start building settlements and so on, but even if we have colonys all over the system the next earthlike planet would be way too far to reach. We are inprisoned in our system for a long time. Even with lightspeed it would take 20 years or more to reach such a planet, a communication lag of 20 years will never be practical so that we could have something like a colony out of our system which is a part of our zivilisation. If there would be ever colonists traveling to another system they would start their own zivilisation with their own development and there would be no communication. I think we will stay in our system for a very long time, if not forever. There will be some robotic exploration of space, but I don't see human deep space exploration happen, as long we can't go over the light barrier. Humans will focus more on virtual environments than in deep space.

#50
Craven

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We'll start with observation. We're nowhere near actually going anywhere outside solar system. But to see planet with liquid water, oxygen in atmosphere, methane. That would be fantastic and might boost espace exploration budget.
"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#51
Craven

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http://www.nasa.gov/...odd-couple.html

Astronomers have discovered a pair of neighboring planets with dissimilar densities orbiting very close to each other. The inner planet, Kepler-36b, orbits its host star every 13.8 days and the outer planet, Kepler-36c, every 16.2 days. On their closest approach, the neighboring duo comes within about 1.2 million miles of each other. This is only five times the Earth-moon distance and about 20 times closer to one another than any two planets in our solar system.

Kepler-36b is a rocky world measuring 1.5 times the radius and 4.5 times the mass of Earth. Kepler-36c is a gaseous giant measuring 3.7 times the radius and eight times the mass of Earth. The planetary odd couple orbits a star slightly hotter and a couple billion years older than our sun, located 1,200 light-years from Earth


PS. Kinda reminds me of Caprica/Geminon from Galactica:
http://media.battles...es_of_Kobol.jpg

Edited by Craven, 21 June 2012 - 08:23 PM.

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"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#52
Craven

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http://www.space.com...here-video.html Kinda confirms my fears about habitability of red dwarf planets :( I bet they are depraved of atmosphere before they can develop life...
"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#53
Raklian

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http://www.space.com...here-video.html

Kinda confirms my fears about habitability of red dwarf planets :(
I bet they are depraved of atmosphere before they can develop life...


That planet is many times closer to its star than Mercury is to our Sun. That's what you expect when a star releases a powerful x-ray filled flare at a planet merely 2 million miles away.

I'm pretty sure there are many planets orbiting red-dwarf stars at a safe distance so life can develop.
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#54
kjaggard

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if we extended our lifetimes to 200 years a twenty year trip to some of the nearby stars would be more like investing a few years in college seems to us now. it won't be nearly as much of our total lifetime as it seems now. If we live a thousand years, or more, journeys to the stars would be so much more acceptable a time useage. Add, faster space propulsion, and cryostasis availability and you can go into stasis for fourty to eighty years and it'd feel like a long weekend to anybody you knew back on earth when you woke up at a new world and sent a message back. create entanglment communications, where one persons data stream is send at one particle and emerges from the entangled one back home. whole communications networks could be built with no time lag.
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#55
Craven

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That planet is many times closer to its star than Mercury is to our Sun. That's what you expect when a star releases a powerful x-ray filled flare at a planet merely 2 million miles away.



http://en.wikipedia....d_dwarf_systems

"Any planet in orbit around a red dwarf would have to orbit very close to its parent star to attain Earth-like surface temperatures; from 0.3 AU (just inside the orbit of Mercury) for a star like Lacaille 8760, to as little as 0.032 AU for a star like Proxima Centauri[10] (such a world would have a year lasting just 6.3 days)."

And to that you need to add that red dwarfs are known for violent flares, unlike more stable yellow dwarfs or short-lived giants.

I'm very interested in atmospheric aspect of red dwarf planets for quite some time but so far no documentary or news answered my doubts. Especially - if tidally locked planet can have stable atmosphere. Tidal locking may mean no spinnig core -> no magnetic field, that holds earths atmosphere in place, especially against solar wind.
"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#56
tornado64

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create entanglment communications, where one persons data stream is send at one particle and emerges from the entangled one back home. whole communications networks could be built with no time lag.


Quantum entanglement dosn't include faster than light information exchange...
FTL communication isn't possible, and it may never possible, but I still hope we can find some tricks to go over the light barrier.
That's why I think we will never have a Type III civilication, to spread all over the galaxie doesn't make sense if you have communication lags of at least a couple of years up to centuries. I think we will long stay inside the solar system, if we can't overcome the speed of light.

#57
Tumaini12

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...red dwarfs are known for violent flares, unlike more stable yellow dwarfs or short-lived giants.

I'm very interested in atmospheric aspect of red dwarf planets for quite some time but so far no documentary or news answered my doubts. Especially - if tidally locked planet can have stable atmosphere. Tidal locking may mean no spinnig core -> no magnetic field, that holds earths atmosphere in place, especially against solar wind.


Why should tidal locking mean no magnetosphere? A tidally-locked planet or moon still rotates, albeit in synchronicity with its orbital period - and if the planet is very close to its star, the rotation period would be only a few Earth days. As long as it possesses a liquid core or mantle, it could still generate a magnetic field.

Mercury has a measurable magnetic field, and its rotation is extremely slow (59 Earth days) - not to mention, in a 3:2 resonance with its orbit.

Iif we consider a large satellite of a gas giant situated in the habitable zone of a red dwarf - you yourself previously suggested that the gas giant's much stronger magnetic field might help shield its moons from the intense stellar flares.

Edited by Tumaini12, 29 June 2012 - 03:57 PM.


#58
Craven

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Mercury has a measurable magnetic field, and its rotation is extremely slow (59 Earth days) - not to mention, in a 3:2 resonance with its orbit.


Would that be enough to hold an atmosphere? I'm not familiar with necessities for magnetic field. I thought it's mainly spinning metallic core. If that not the case, there may be a hope for red dwarf planets :)
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"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#59
Craven

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Gliese 581g is back on the table. One our best candidates for habitable planets is just 20 light years away.

http://io9.com/59277...ting-gilese-581

Astronomers confirm there are two potentially habitable planets orbiting Gilese 581

Remember Gliese 581g? The potentially habitable "second Earth" 20 light years away, also known as Zarmina? It's been looking dicey for a while, as many astronomers questioned its very existence.
But now, Gilese 581g has been re-added to the top five list of exoplanets considered prime candidates for harboring of life. New data from Steven Vogt of UC Santa Cruz clearly shows that it's quite real. And what's just as exciting is the realization that there are now two potentially habitable planets orbiting the same star.
Gilese 581g was originally discovered by astronomers of the Lick-Carnegie Exoplanet survey in 2010, but subsequent surveys were unable to detect it.

The planet is about 1.5 times the size of Earth and it receives a similar amount of sunlight. Though it orbits a red dwarf, it resides within its sun's habitable zone and is considered the best exoplanetary candidate for life yet discovered.
As Abel Torres of Planetary Habitability Laboratory notes, "These factors combine to make Gliese 581g the most Earth-like planet known with an Earth Similarity Index, a measure of Earth-likeness from zero to one, of 0.92 and higher than the previously top candidate Gliese 667Cc, discovered last year."
And indeed, the Gilese system, with its two potentially life-friendly planets, may be our best bet when considering our first interstellar mission. At 20 light-years away, it's clearly the most exciting solar system in our immediate vicinity.
Other planets suspected of harboring life include Kepler-22b, HD85512, and Gliese 581d.
You can read's Vogt's entire study here. And read our exclusive interview with Vogt about Gliese 581g, from a couple years ago, here.

Edited by Craven, 21 July 2012 - 01:54 PM.

"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#60
Zeitgeist123

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Posted Imageor we could have this:

Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

Edited by Zeitgeist123, 22 July 2012 - 09:30 AM.

“Philosophy is a pretty toy if one indulges in it with moderation at the right time of life. But if one pursues it further than one should, it is absolute ruin." - Callicles to Socrates





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