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North Korea Watch Thread

North Korea DPRK Korea Juche communism Stalinism Orwellian 1984 China South Korea

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#681
Sciencerocks

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North Korea just tested a missile that experts say could reach anywhere in the US
Alex Lockie at Business Insider

http://www.businessi...tire-us-2017-11

"SNIP...........

North Korea tested a missile on Tuesday that experts say could reach any part of the US.

The missile flew about 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) and landed in the sea east of Japan, but crested at a remarkable 4,500 kilometers (2,800 miles) above the Earth's surface, making it the highest and longest-lasting flight North Korea has completed to date.

North Korea previously tested intercontinental-ranged ballistic missiles, but those did not display ranges sufficient to hit important targets on the US's East Coast.

David Wright, a physicist and the codirector of the Union of Concerned Scientists' global security program, wrote in a recent blog post that North Korea's latest missile could likely fly 8,100 miles on a normal trajectory, enough to reach anywhere in the continental US.

 



#682
Yuli Ban

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I wanted to mention, it actually got up to 2,800 miles! Even going up from 2,300 to 2,800 miles from the previous test to this one is a major improvement. 
A visual of their current range:
pa-32338880.jpg?strip=all&w=960

The funny thing is, I'm just barely outside the missile range.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#683
TheComrade

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North Korea just tested a missile that experts say could reach anywhere in the US

 

Good! Now they'll need to work on accuracy, so that their missiles would hit exactly the target instead of "target +/- 200 km". With such pace of progress as they've demonstrated, it should take only a few years.

 

Btw, about "socialism doesn't work"... the whole story of Korean missile program demonstrates that socialism (even distorted one) DOES work. This was the incredible achievement for such a small and poor country. And the famous phrase about "Upper Volta with missiles" is nonsense. To build missiles (better and better with each passed year) you need advanced industry and science plus bunch of engineers and qualified workers. And this all already means you're not Upper Volta.

 

Some conspiracy theorists, hovewer, insists that such a fast progress is still a bit suspicious. There shoud be someone more experienced behind those North Korean engineers. Who knows? I wouldn't be much surprised if it was true.



#684
bgates276

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North Korea just tested a missile that experts say could reach anywhere in the US

 

Good! Now they'll need to work on accuracy, so that their missiles could hit exactly the target instead of "target +/- 200 km". With such pace of progress as they've demonstrated, it should take only a few years.

 

Btw, about "socialism doesn't work"... the whole story of Korean missile program demonstrates that socialism (even distorted one) DOES work. This was the incredible achievement for such a small and poor country. And the famous phrase about "Upper Volta with missiles" is nonsense. To build missiles (better and better with each passed year) you need advanced industry and science plus bunch of engineers and qualified workers. And this all already means you're not Upper Volta.

 

Some conspiracy theorists, hovewer, insists that such a fast progress is still a bit suspicious. There shoud be someone more experienced behind those North Korean engineers. Who knows? I wouldn't be much surprised if it was true.

 

 

I think this just shows how capable the Koreans are, with their high IQ's, in spite of a terrible system. It makes me wonder how much more powerful they would be, if they were operating at peak efficiency. There's been rumors that South Korea already has secret nuclear capabilities. 



#685
Yuli Ban

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I still don't get the propensity to call North Korea "communist." They literally have more in common with Japanese fascism than they do Marxism-Leninism, and  they never commanded the trust of other socialist states because they knew what Kim Il-Sung was actually going for. I think Mao was more supportive of Saloth Sar/Pol Pot than he was Kim Il-Sung (before he heard what was going on in Cambodia). I mean, they were giving the Khmer Rouge instructions on how to build communism— build socialism first, create an industrial proletariat, etc.— and the Cambodians ignored them. The Chinese and Russians didn't even bother with the North Koreans, which you'd think would be a red flag (no pun intended).

 

It also makes sense if you look further back into Korean history. They didn't start opposing Western imperialism in 1948— they'd been called the 'Hermit Kingdom' and opponents of imperial hegemony since the 1600s, since the Joseon days. They've never been internationally minded— trying to make them so fundamentally misunderstands their culture. Their culture doesn't change because they're following a new book; at least, not unless they've been following that book for many generations. It's like when Britain, Russia/USSR/ and America tried invading Afghanistan— none of us bothered to understand Afghani culture because we assume that they'll roll over for us and our ideals with enough pressure, but that's just not the way they are. Failing to understand someone else's culture, especially attempting to apply a universal standard towards it, will almost always result in misunderstanding.

 

That's not different for North Korea. The South is only so different because it's a US puppet, and even then it's not like they're that different from the North. We're just told they're different, and we know that they have a freer economy and shinier buildings. Yet they were under a repressive fascist dictatorship for decades, then elected the daughter of the dictator that ruled them and they deposed, and it turned out that she was being controlled by a bunch of billionaire shamans so they had to depose her as well, and it's not like there was a revolution that undid the whole network that made this possible. Not to mention a handful of megacorps literally control the country. They, too, keep elements of Japanese imperialism in their culture (despite demanding apology from Japan for their WWII atrocities), on top of already having an isolationist and xenophobic culture.

 

 

I dunno, it just doesn't seem like anyone's got the full story on either of the Koreas and completely ignoring their history in lieu of what they claim to be now is part of the problem.


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#686
Zaphod

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I still don't get the propensity to call North Korea "communist." They literally have more in common with Japanese fascism than they do Marxism-Leninism, and  they never commanded the trust of other socialist states because they knew what Kim Il-Sung was actually going for. I think Mao was more supportive of Saloth Sar/Pol Pot than he was Kim Il-Sung (before he heard what was going on in Cambodia). I mean, they were giving the Khmer Rouge instructions on how to build communism— build socialism first, create an industrial proletariat, etc.— and the Cambodians ignored them. The Chinese and Russians didn't even bother with the North Koreans, which you'd think would be a red flag (no pun intended). 

 

It also makes sense if you look further back into Korean history. They didn't start opposing Western imperialism in 1948— they'd been called the 'Hermit Kingdom' and opponents of imperial hegemony since the 1600s, since the Joseon days. They've never been internationally minded— trying to make them so fundamentally misunderstands their culture. Their culture doesn't change because they're following a new book; at least, not unless they've been following that book for many generations. It's like when Britain, Russia/USSR/ and America tried invading Afghanistan— none of us bothered to understand Afghani culture because we assume that they'll roll over for us and our ideals with enough pressure, but that's just not the way they are. Failing to understand someone else's culture, especially attempting to apply a universal standard towards it, will almost always result in misunderstanding.

 

That's not different for North Korea. The South is only so different because it's a US puppet, and even then it's not like they're that different from the North. We're just told they're different, and we know that they have a freer economy and shinier buildings. Yet they were under a repressive fascist dictatorship for decades, then elected the daughter of the dictator that ruled them and they deposed, and it turned out that she was being controlled by a bunch of billionaire shamans so they had to depose her as well, and it's not like there was a revolution that undid the whole network that made this possible. Not to mention a handful of megacorps literally control the country. They, too, keep elements of Japanese imperialism in their culture (despite demanding apology from Japan for their WWII atrocities), on top of already having an isolationist and xenophobic culture.

 

 

I dunno, it just doesn't seem like anyone's got the full story on either of the Koreas and completely ignoring their history in lieu of what they claim to be now is part of the problem.

 

Many North Korean defectors have also described how internally there is essentially a highly resource-depleted capitalistic system operating. Since the government provides next to nothing or nothing. 

 

https://youtu.be/DyqUw0WYwoc?t=13m4s



#687
caltrek

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The abilities—and limits—of North Korean early warning

 

https://thebulletin....ly-warning11295

 

Introduction:

 

(The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists) At 2:00 a.m. on a quiet night, a North Korean navy vessel on routine patrol moves slowly north along the eastern coast of North Korea. The watch officer on the ship is the first to notice signs: a barely audible rumble of engines from the north and small objects glinting in the moonlight as they streak toward North Korean shores. By the time the sound of the engines fades, it is clear to all on board that 20 to 30 cruise missiles are headed toward targets in North Korea.

 

Immediately, the ship contacts East Sea Fleet headquarters, which passes word to national leadership in Pyongyang. The source of the missiles can’t be known for sure, but few doubt their origin: US destroyers well out in the Sea of Japan have launched Tomahawk cruise missiles in response to North Korea’s latest nuclear weapon test. The missiles, traveling 100 to 150 feet above the water at speeds of more than 800 kilometers per hour, will reach their targets in 10 to 15 minutes.

 

Though this scenario is fiction—and hopefully will stay that way—it raises some crucial questions about North Korea’s early warning systems. How effectively can they detect attacks? How much warning will they provide the North Korean leadership? How will the capabilities and condition of Pyongyang’s early warning systems affect the nation’s response to military action?

 

If South Korea or the United States attacked the north, the amount of warning Pyongyang received would depend on the specific military action. A large-scale military operation would be relatively easy to detect. But a small-scale strike such as a cruise missile attack would be much more difficult—and could force North Korean leaders to make difficult decisions based on very little advance warning.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#688
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Five Points Concerning North Korea

 

https://thebulletin....g-out-time11368

 

Extract:

 

 

(Bulletin of Atomic Scientists) First, North Korea is not going to give up nuclear weapons just because we want them to. They are a failed economy with only one thing going for them—their nuclear weapons program. They will not give it up ever.

Second, China will put pressure on North Korea to express their displeasure, but not to break North Korea. China wants a divided Korean peninsula. The last thing they want is for North Korea to collapse and have South Korea take over. China is willing to put pressure on North Korea to get North Korea to stop doing things that are awkward for China. North Korea’s provocative military gestures are awkward for China, which is why China is putting pressure on them now. But China will not break North Korea because they need North Korea. And North Korea knows this. China’s real strategy is to drive a wedge between the United States and South Korea.

Third, we are never going to reward North Korea for becoming a weapon state. Somehow the North Koreans think that once they can threaten the United States, we will give up and give them something in exchange for being nice to us. That will never happen. We will support North Korea financially only when they abandon nuclear weapons. That won’t happen, so there are no rewards on the horizon for North Korea.

Fourth, we anticipated North Korea’s actions 20 years ago. We started then to deploy a missile defense system in Alaska designed to knock down North Korean missiles. It is in place, and we can expand it. The purpose of a missile defense system is not to keep blocking wave after wave of attacking missiles. The purpose of a missile defense system is to buy time – to block the initial attack long enough for us to retaliate with overwhelming nuclear destruction. That will happen. North Korea knows that will happen. North Korea is not suicidal.

Fifth, we are not going to invade North Korea to find their nuclear weapons and destroy them. The North Koreans know this. They also know that we are not going to preemptively attack them because they now have a nuclear retaliatory capability and the destruction of our South Korean (and maybe Japanese) ally would be horrendous and unacceptable.

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#689
eacao

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North Korea just tested a missile that experts say could reach anywhere in the US

 

Good! Now they'll need to work on accuracy, so that their missiles would hit exactly the target instead of "target +/- 200 km". With such pace of progress as they've demonstrated, it should take only a few years.

 

Btw, about "socialism doesn't work"... the whole story of Korean missile program demonstrates that socialism (even distorted one) DOES work. This was the incredible achievement for such a small and poor country. And the famous phrase about "Upper Volta with missiles" is nonsense. To build missiles (better and better with each passed year) you need advanced industry and science plus bunch of engineers and qualified workers. And this all already means you're not Upper Volta.

 

Some conspiracy theorists, hovewer, insists that such a fast progress is still a bit suspicious. There shoud be someone more experienced behind those North Korean engineers. Who knows? I wouldn't be much surprised if it was true.

 

 

wait -- you're missing the point. Socialism can get some things done. It fails time and again at getting the right things done. What to produce, how to produce it, who gets it. Those are the three fundamental concerns of any economic system whether it's centrally planned or market dominated.

 

Socialist systems put the purchasing power in the hands of a third party. A third party can and will choose to put themselves above you. The North Koreans are the epitome of this with their starving population living in the shadows beneath their ballistic missiles. Market driven systems put the purchasing power in the hands of the individuals. They own their own capital and choose how to use their wealth based on their own opportunity cost.

 

No trust given to a third party, no being at the mercy of someone else's honest nature. 

 

The grand Soviet Union goes to show the instability of centrally planned systems today. A lot of progress can be made for some time but in the end, mispricing of opportunity cost makes for a top-heavy system, and trusting others to provide for you puts your welbeing in absolute risk. Especially with the political imprisonment citizens of communist regimes find themselves in. 

 

So yeah. Work at what


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#690
TheComrade

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^ ^ ^ Well, yes, the well-known and actively discussed (in 1960-s) problem of planned economy: how to properly define and measure the people's needs.



#691
joe00uk

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The Party isn't some random object that fell out of the sky just imposing its will on the people. What is the Party made up of? People. People who were/are elected representatives. By whom? Their electorate. Who is that? The adult population. For higher bodies of the Party the electorate would be the lower Party bodies but even so, ultimately it goes/went back to the entire electorate. Everyone in the Party, no matter what level they were at, had a mandate both from their electors and from their seniors. If they failed to satisfy the electorate, they were replaced in the next election (and still are in North Korea and Cuba) - often there could even be immediate recall. Of course, if they failed to perform their duties to their seniors then they could also be dismissed. There was/is both upwards and downwards accountability.

 

As for meeting people's needs, well it's like I said, they had a mandate - which obviously included that as an integral part of it. They had to work to satisfy the needs of the people or they would be dismissed or voted out, etc. Corruption and bureaucracy in Communist parties only ever flourished when the people became apathetic (and also when market mechanisms were introduced). Whenever the people took full advantage of socialist democracy, corruption was low. For example, Cuba today has managed to keep the active, participatory, revolutionary spirit among its people and it has the most democratic political structure the world has ever seen. North Korea, being under siege conditions, obviously would have a difficult time relaxing - it's basically under a semi-wartime command structure, because it has to be to survive. Any capitalist country under North Korea's situation would have collapsed into a failed state very quickly. Still, North Korea hasn't seen starvation in 20 years now and India (a huge economy under no blockades) has a worse problem with hunger.

 

The collapse of the USSR was largely due to the implementation of market mechanisms, beginning under Khrushchev and culminating under Gorbachev's perestroika. The era of stagnation from 1975 was due to the hampered efficiency of the planned economy due to the growth of the capitalist black market second economy and other legal market mechanisms. I recommend this article about "Do Publicly Owned, Planned Economies Work?". Yes, it's on a blog but it has good citations everywhere so it's fine. As for how the free market is supposedly efficient at meeting the needs of the people - does one need look further than Africa? That's a continent full of capitalist countries there. People talk about capitalist countries meaning those of Western Europe, North America, Japan, Australia or New Zealand. They don't mention that these are imperialist powers whose wealth is extracted from the labour and resources of the Third World, which I suppose "free market" could be a handy euphemism for.

 

An excerpt from that article:

 

The Soviet Union was a concrete example of what a publicly owned, planned economy could produce: full employment, guaranteed pensions, paid maternity leave, limits on working hours, free healthcare and education (including higher education), subsidized vacations, inexpensive housing, low-cost childcare, subsidized public transportation, and rough income equality. Most of us want these benefits. However, are they achievable permanently? It is widely believed that while the Soviet Union may have produced these benefits, in the end, Soviet public ownership and planning proved to be unworkable. Otherwise, how to account for the country’s demise? Yet, when the Soviet economy was publicly owned and planned, from 1928 to 1989, it reliably expanded from year to year, except during the war years. To be clear, while capitalist economies plunged into a major depression and reliably lapsed into recessions every few years, the Soviet economy just as unfailingly did not, expanding unremittingly and always providing jobs for all. Far from being unworkable, the Soviet Union’s publicly owned and planned economy succeeded remarkably well. What was unworkable was capitalism, with its occasional depressions, regular recessions, mass unemployment, and extremes of wealth and poverty, all the more evident today as capitalist economies contract or limp along, condemning numberless people to forced idleness. What eventually led to the Soviet Union’s demise was the accumulated toll on the Soviet economy of the West’s efforts to bring it down, the Reagan administration’s intensification of the Cold War, and the Soviet leadership’s inability to find a way out of the predicament these developments occasioned.

 

Examples of how it fared meeting the needs of the people:

 

The benefits of the Soviet economic system were found in the elimination of the ills of capitalism—an end to unemployment, inflation, depressions and recessions, and extremes of wealth and poverty; an end to exploitation, which is to say, the practice of living off the labour of others; and the provision of a wide array of free and virtually free public services.

 

Among the most important accomplishments of the Soviet economy was the abolition of unemployment. Not only did the Soviet Union provide jobs for all, work was considered a social obligation, of such importance that it was enshrined in the constitution. The 1936 constitution stipulated that “citizens of the USSR have the right to work, that is, are guaranteed the right to employment and payment for their work in accordance with quantity and quality.” On the other hand, making a living through means other than work was prohibited. Hence, deriving an income from rent, profits, speculation or the black market – social parasitism – was illegal (Szymanski, 1984). Finding a job was easy, because labour was typically in short supply. Consequently, employees had a high degree of bargaining power on the job, with obvious benefits in job security, and management paying close attention to employee satisfaction (Kotz, 2003).

 

Article 41 of the 1977 constitution capped the workweek at 41 hours. Workers on night shift worked seven hours but received full (eight-hour) shift pay. Workers employed at dangerous jobs (e.g., mining) or where sustained alertness was critical (e.g. physicians) worked six or seven-hour shifts, but received fulltime pay. Overtime work was prohibited except under special circumstances (Szymanski, 1984).

 

From the 1960s, employees received an average of one month of vacation (Keeran and Kenny, 2004; Szymanski, 1984) which could be taken at subsidized resorts (Kotz, 2003).

 

All Soviet citizens were provided a retirement income, men at the age of 60, and women at the age of 55 (Lerouge, 2010). The right to a pension (as well as disability benefits) was guaranteed by the Soviet constitution (Article 43, 1977), rather than being revocable and subject to the momentary whims of politicians, as is the case in capitalist countries.

 

That US citizens had to pay for their healthcare was considered extremely barbaric in the Soviet Union, and Soviet citizens “often questioned US tourists quite incredulously on this point.”

 

Women were granted maternity leave from their jobs with full pay as early as 1936 and this, too, along with many other benefits, was guaranteed in the Soviet constitution (Article 122, 1936). At the same time, the 1936 constitution made provision for a wide network of maternity homes, nurseries and kindergartens, while the revised 1977 constitution obligated the state to help “the family by providing and developing a broad system of childcare…by paying grants on the birth of a child, by providing children’s allowances and benefits for large families” (Article 53). The Soviet Union was the first country to develop public childcare (Szymanski, 1984).

 

Women in the USSR were accorded equal rights with men in all spheres of economic, state, cultural, social and political life (Article 122, 1936), including the equal right with men to employment, rest and leisure, social insurance and education. Among its many firsts, the USSR was the first country to legalize abortions, which were available at no cost (Sherman, 1969). It was also the first country to bring women into top government positions. An intense campaign was undertaken in Soviet Central Asia to liberate women from the misogynist oppression of conservative Islam. This produced a radical transformation of the condition of women’s lives in these areas (Szymanski, 1984).

 

The right to housing was guaranteed under a 1977 constitutional provision (Article 44). Urban housing space, however, was cramped, about half of what it was per capita in Austria and West Germany. The reasons were inadequate building in Tsarist times, the massive destruction of housing during World War II, and Soviet emphasis on heavy industry. Prior to the October Revolution, inadequate urban housing was built for ordinary people. After the revolution, new housing was built, but the housing stock remained insufficient. Housing draws heavily on capital, which the government needed urgently for the construction of industry. In addition, Nazi invaders destroyed one-third to one-half of Soviet dwellings during the Second World War (Sherman, 1969).

 

City-dwellers typically lived in apartment buildings owned by the enterprise in which they worked or by the local government. Rents were dirt cheap by law, about two to three percent of the family budget, while utilities were four to five percent (Szymanski, 1984; Keeran and Kenny, 2004). This differed sharply with the United States, where rents consumed a significant share of the average family budget (Szymanski, 1984), and still do.

 

Food staples and other necessities were subsidized, while luxury items were sold well above their costs.

 

Public transportation was efficient, extensive, and practically free. Subway fare was about eight cents in the 1970s, unchanged from the 1930s (Szymanski, 1984). Nothing comparable has ever existed in capitalist countries. This is because efficient, affordable and extensive public transportation would severely limit the profit-making opportunities of automobile manufacturers, petroleum companies, and civil engineering firms. In order to safeguard their profits, these firms use their wealth, connections and influence to stymie development of extensive, efficient and inexpensive public alternatives to private transportation. Governments, which need to keep private industry happy so that it continues to provide jobs, are constrained to play along. The only way to alter this is to bring capital under public control, in order to use it to meet public policy goals set out in a consciously constructed plan.

 

The Soviet Union placed greater stress on healthcare than their capitalist competitors did. No other country had more physicians per capita or more hospital beds per capita than the USSR. In 1977, the Soviet Union had 35 doctors and 212 hospital beds per 10,000 compared to 18 doctors and 63 hospital beds in the United States (Szymanski, 1984). Most important, healthcare was free. That US citizens had to pay for their healthcare was considered extremely barbaric in the Soviet Union, and Soviet citizens “often questioned US tourists quite incredulously on this point” (Sherman, 1969).

 

Education through university was also free, and stipends were available for post-secondary students, adequate to pay for textbooks, room and board, and other expenses (Sherman, 1969; Szymanski, 1984).

 

Income inequality in the Soviet Union was mild compared to capitalist countries. The difference between the highest income and the average wage was equivalent to the difference between the income of a physician in the United States and an average worker, about 8 to 10 times higher (Szymanski, 1984). The elite’s higher incomes afforded privileges no greater than being able to acquire a modest house and car (Kotz, 2000). By comparison, in 2010, Canada’s top-paid 100 CEOs received incomes 155 times higher than the average full-time wage. The average full-time wage was $43,000 (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 2011). An income 10 times larger would be $430,000—about what members of the capitalist elite make in a single week. A factor that mitigated the modest degree of Soviet income inequality was the access all Soviet citizens had to essential services at no, or virtually, no cost. Accordingly, the degree of material inequality was even smaller than the degree of income inequality (Szymanski, 1984).

 

Soviet leaders did not live in the opulent mansions that are the commonplace residences of presidents, prime ministers and monarchs in most of the world’s capitals (Parenti, 1997). Gorbachev, for example, lived in a four-family apartment building. Leningrad’s top construction official lived in a one-bedroom apartment, while the top political official in Minsk, his wife, daughter and son-in-law inhabited a two-bedroom apartment (Kotz and Weir, 1997). Critics of the Soviet Union accused the elite of being an exploiting ruling class, but the elite’s modest incomes and humble material circumstances raise serious doubt about this assessment. If it was indeed an exploiting ruling class, it was the oddest one in human history.

 

So, I mean, they didn't do too badly meeting the needs of the people.



#692
Sciencerocks

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North Korea declares latest U.N. sanctions 'an act of war'
Source: The Washington Post

 


By Amy B Wang December 24 at 1:48 PM

North Korea said on Sunday that sanctions imposed by the United Nations last week are an “act of war,” and Pyongyang vowed to bolster its nuclear force in an outright rejection of the resolution.

“We define this ‘sanctions resolution’ rigged by the U.S. and its followers as a grave infringement upon the sovereignty of our republic and as an act of war violating peace and stability in the Korean Peninsula and the region,” North Korea's foreign ministry said in a statement on state media.

The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Friday to impose additional sanctions on North Korea because of its missile tests, the third time the Security Council had ratcheted up sanctions this year. This latest round tightens North Korea’s oil imports and calls on other countries to expel North Korean guest workers within two years. Those guest workers are a major source on foreign income for Pyongyang, and two of the biggest employers of North Koreans are Security Council members China and Russia.

The sanctions are part of a continuing effort to coerce the North Korean government into negotiating an end to its development of nuclear weapons. The previous round of sanctions, imposed in mid-September, was followed by more than two months of calm without a missile or weapons test. But on Nov. 29 Pyongyang launched a missile, identified as a Hwasong-15, that it said could reach any part of the United States.

 

 

Read more: https://www.washingt...s-an-act-of-war



#693
caltrek

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Why do I have a bad feeling about this?

 

U.S. Sanctions North Korea Missile Experts, Russia Offers to Mediate

 

https://www.msn.com/...ID=ansmsnnews11

 

Introduction:

 

 

(Reuters) The United States announced sanctions on two North Korean officials behind their country's ballistic missile program on Tuesday, while Russia reiterated an offer to mediate to ease tensions between Washington and Pyongyang.

 

The new U.S. steps were the latest in a campaign aimed at forcing North Korea - which has defied years of multilateral and bilateral sanctions - to abandon a weapons program aimed at developing nuclear-tipped missiles capable of hitting the United States.

 

The U.S. Treasury named the officials as Kim Jong Sik and Ri Pyong Chol. It said Kim was reportedly a key figure in North Korea's efforts to switch its missile program from liquid to solid fuel, while Ri was reported to be a key official in its intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) development.

 

"Treasury is targeting leaders of North Korea’s ballistic missile programs, as part of our maximum pressure campaign to isolate (North Korea) and achieve a fully denuclearized Korean Peninsula,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement.

 

The largely symbolic steps block any property or interests the two might have within U.S. jurisdiction and prohibit any dealings by U.S. citizens with them.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#694
Sciencerocks

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North Korea leader says he has a 'nuclear button on my desk' and that the deterrent will prevent war
Source: Washington Post
By Washington Post Staff December 31 at 8:57 PM

 

In his annual New Year’s Day address, Kim Jong Un vowed to focus on producing nuclear warheads and missiles for operational deployment, adding that the United States is now within range. But he also said North Korea won’t use nuclear weapons unless it faces aggression, and he opened the door to dialogue with South Korea.

This is a developing story. It will be updated.

 

 

Read more: https://www.washingt...-united-states/


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#695
Sciencerocks

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Trump: I have a 'much bigger' button than Kim Jong Un
Source: The Hill

 

President Trump on Tuesday said that the nuclear launch button on his desk is "much bigger" and "more powerful" than that of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un – and that his button actually "works."

"North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un just stated that the 'Nuclear Button is on his desk at all times,'" Trump tweeted. "Will someone from his depleted and food starved regime please inform him that I too have a Nuclear Button, but it is a much bigger & more powerful one than his, and my Button works!"

Trump's comments came after Kim said in a New Year's Day speech that he had a nuclear launch button at his desk, and that the international community would have to accept North Korea's status as a nuclear-armed nation as a "reality."

In that address, Kim also said he was willing to send a delegation to the Winter Olympics in South Korea in February and engage in talks with Seoul about easing military tensions between the two countries.

 

 

Read more: http://thehill.com/h...han-kim-jong-un



#696
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Trump: I have a 'much bigger' button than Kim Jong Un

That moment when two grown men compare sizes of something like it's a fucking competition.

They should just both take estrogen and Xanax and be done with it.
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Completely redpilled.

#697
Pisiu369

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Trump: I have a 'much bigger' button than Kim Jong Un

That moment when two grown men compare sizes of something like it's a fucking competition.

They should just both take estrogen and Xanax and be done with it.

 

Them comparing sizes is much better than them actually doing something about it.



#698
Sciencerocks

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You're so right aswerise..Giving all men estrogen would end a lot of bullshit in this world.



#699
Pisiu369

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You're so right aswerise..Giving all men estrogen would end a lot of bullshit in this world.

 

Giving all men estrogen would mess up the world more than not giving men estrogen, you're deranged.


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North Korea Accidentally Hit Its Own City During Missile Test According To New Report

https://www.msn.com/...ocid=spartanntp

 

North Korea conducted a missile test on April 28, 2017 that didn't go quite as planned. In fact, we're now learning that the Hwasong-12 missile that the country launched actually went astray and may have hit the North Korean city of Tokchon.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: North Korea, DPRK, Korea, Juche, communism, Stalinism, Orwellian, 1984, China, South Korea

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