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Oldest Homo sapiens fossil claim rewrites our species' history

humans homo sapiens africa origins evolution paleontology

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#1
wjfox

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Oldest Homo sapiens fossil claim rewrites our species' history

07 June 2017

Researchers say that they have found the oldest Homo sapiens remains on record in an improbable place: Morocco.

At an archaeological site near the Atlantic coast, finds of skull, face and jaw bones identified as being from early members of our species have been dated to about 315,000 years ago. That indicates H. sapiens appeared more than 100,000 years earlier than thought: most researchers have placed the origins of our species in East Africa about 200,000 years ago.

The finds, which are published on 7 June in Nature, do not mean that H. sapiens originated in North Africa. Instead, they suggest that the species' earliest members evolved all across the continent, scientists say.

http://www.nature.co...history-1.22114

 

 

1skulls_web.jpg


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#2
Maximus

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Amazing. As with any branch of science, there are always new discoveries waiting to be made that change our previous understanding. There was also the G. freybergi discovery a few weeks ago that could even put the evolution of the first hominids somewhere around Bulgaria!



#3
Sciencerocks

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The more we dig the more questions we have to answer. Our understanding of ourselfs and the world around us can change at any moment.

 

This is why science is so awesome.


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#4
Yuli Ban

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So the first Homo sapiens may have been Mediterraneans? 

 

That would actually explain pretty well why we could interbreed with Neanderthals so easily to the point of having a high amount of their DNA present in ourselves.


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#5
Zaphod

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The more we dig the more questions we have to answer. Our understanding of ourselfs and the world around us can change at any moment.

 

This is why science is so awesome.

 

"I was saying 20 years ago that the only thing we should be calling Homo sapiens are humans that look like us. This was a view that Homo sapiens suddenly appeared in Africa at some point in time and that was the beginning of our species. But it now looks like I was wrong," Prof Stringer told BBC News.

 

This is also why science is awesome. True scientists aren't interested in proving themselves correct, but just want to find the true answer. I've only experienced it on a minor scale, but there is a thrill in finding a result that is completely counter to your hypothesis. 


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#6
TheComrade

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So the first Homo sapiens may have been Mediterraneans? 

 

That would actually explain pretty well why we could interbreed with Neanderthals so easily to the point of having a high amount of their DNA present in ourselves.

 

No. If first Homo Sapiens were of mediterranean origin, then black Africans would have Neanderthal DNA too, while they actually aren't.



#7
Yuli Ban

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^ Further fueling my belief that there may be something modern science isn't willing to tell us about the human species.

 

How many living species (or subspecies) of humans are there, Science? Is the truth not politically correct or is it just not the truth?


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#8
TheComrade

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How many living species (or subspecies) of humans are there, Science?

 

HOW DARE YOU???  :angry:  :angry:  :angry: 

 

But yes, in countries less obsessed with politcorrectness, such as Russia, the answer is: differences between major human races are enough to consider them as "subspecies". But since the term itself is a bit artificial, there is a common agreement to avoid this when talking about modern human beings. This is what i've read in books/articles of our local anthropologists.



#9
sara amber

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Correct me if i am wrong, or well in this case if my teacher was wrong..but we were taught that there is currently only one species of the genus Homo that is still living, H. sapiens. These are anatomically modern humans, and the majority of our DNA are the same as all others of the species. There used to be other human species, such as H. s. idaltu or H. neanderthalensis. But as for now, anatomically modern humans are the only human species on earth. Question- Is this in Theory correct?



#10
TheComrade

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Correct me if i am wrong, or well in this case if my teacher was wrong..but we were taught that there is currently only one species of the genus Homo that is still living, H. sapiens. These are anatomically modern humans, and the majority of our DNA are the same as all others of the species. There used to be other human species, such as H. s. idaltu or H. neanderthalensis. But as for now, anatomically modern humans are the only human species on earth. Question- Is this in Theory correct?

 

Yes, correct. But there are nuances, for example: there are still discussions about Neandertals. Were they the separate specie - Homo Neanderthalensis - or they should be considered as separate subspecie of Homo Sapiens? If so, then they should be called Homo Sapiens Neanderthalensis (green part - the name of specie, yellow part - the name of subspecie). The same way Homo Sapiens Idaltu were the early subspecie of our specie.


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#11
sara amber

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Correct me if i am wrong, or well in this case if my teacher was wrong..but we were taught that there is currently only one species of the genus Homo that is still living, H. sapiens. These are anatomically modern humans, and the majority of our DNA are the same as all others of the species. There used to be other human species, such as H. s. idaltu or H. neanderthalensis. But as for now, anatomically modern humans are the only human species on earth. Question- Is this in Theory correct?

 

Yes, correct. But there are nuances, for example: there are still discussions about Neandertals. Were they the separate specie - Homo Neanderthalensis - or they should be considered as separate subspecie of Homo Sapiens? If so, then they should be called Homo Sapiens Neanderthalensis (green part - the name of specie, yellow part - the name of subspecie). The same way Homo Sapiens Idaltu were the early subspecie of our specie.

 

Aha. Got it!.it's always refreshing to learn a thing or two! Thank you.



#12
caltrek

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New Evidence Points to Sophisticated Tools, Distant Trading for Early Humans

 

https://www.courthou...r-early-humans/

 

Introduction:

 

(Courthouse News) — Anthropologists at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and a team of international collaborators discovered that early humans in East Africa displayed sophisticated behavior, trading and tool crafting tens of thousands of years earlier than previously assumed.

 

Middle Stone Age humans began using color pigments, creating sophisticated tools and trading with distant groups about 320,000 years ago, a period matching the oldest known fossil record of Homo sapiens. These behaviors replaced the technologies and ways of life of Early Stone Age humans, whose practices had been in place for hundreds of thousands of years.

 

In a statement, Smithsonian researchers referred to these discoveries as “milestones in humans’ evolutionary past.”

 

In an earlier era, experts say humans crafted large, unrefined tools resembling all-purpose stone axes. But new research has uncovered advanced, smaller tools that had been more carefully crafted by later groups. Many of the tools were specialized, designed to be attached to a shaft and potentially used as projectile weapons, while others were shaped as scrapers or needles.

Potts-looking-at-Olorgesailie-Handaxes.j

 

Rick Potts, director of the National Museum of Natural History’s Human Origins Program at the Smithsonian, surveys an assortment of Early Stone Age hand-axes discovered in the Olorgesailie Basin, Kenya.

(Photo credit: Smithsonian)


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: humans, homo sapiens, africa, origins, evolution, paleontology

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