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Tech changes since 2000 and future trends


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#1
Sciencerocks

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List some tech changes since 2000 in this thread...

1. Has to do with computers being able to fit more stuff onto the CPU.

 

2000 https://en.wikipedia...i/130_nanometer

2017 https://en.wikipedia...ki/10_nanometer

 

List some more advancements

 

 

 


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#2
wjfox

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This doesn't belong here. It either goes in the History forum, or off-topic. This section, as its title says, is for science and technology of the future.



#3
wjfox

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Okay, I have re-opened this thread with a different title, so it's more future-focused.


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#4
sasuke2490

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Use my link for free steam wallet codes if you want


#5
Casey

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I'll aim for about 10 to start things off. I'm sure a lot of these will be related to computers and the internet; the beginning of the internet is kind of like the advent of electricity in that it's just not one giant change, but dozens and dozens of small, moderate, and large changes.

Let's see.

1. At the beginning of 2000, there were probably only three computers in the entire world that could be measured in teraflops (the November 1999 TOP500 list has three such computers, and January 2000 was right around the corner). Needless to say, this is insanely weak by modern standards. By the end of 2018, it's entirely possible that the TOP500 will be petaflop computers only since one petaflop of power will only cost around $40,000 by the end of 2017.

2. Whenever the 2000s began, barely more than four percent of the global population had an internet connection. By December 2000, that number fell just short of six. If you had your own internet connection in 2000, you were part of the lucky few far as the overall world goes. You were even part of the minority in America, since the 50 percent penetration mark wasn't reached until 2001. Very different story in 2017, the year where those who don't have the internet finally become a minority on a worldwide scale (a very large minority, granted, but still... even at the 'business as usual' rate of 3 to 4 percent per year, the global percentage of those with a connection would be around 60 percent by the beginning of the 2020s, and in the 80s or 90s by the decade's end).

3. The Gameboy Color was still in its prime, the Gameboy Advance not coming out until the next year. Graphically, the Gameboy Color fell shy of the original Famicom from 1983, meaning that the 2000 videogame world was still somewhat tethered to the 1980s. Whenever the major, official companies with millions or billions to burn turn out graphics like this, and it's a completely sincere and authentic effort rather than some kind of retro throwback, you know you've entered a different kind of world.

4. kjaggard mentioned the concept of a read-write society once, where regular people have more control over media and the general flow of society. In 2000, some areas were certainly more democratized than they were a few years prior, namely far as pure text-related stuff goes: you could publish news or your own personal fiction online, and you could make primitive videogames that were somewhere between the 8-bit and 16-bit eras at best. Here in 2017, far more domains have joined that group. Youtube democratized things in the video realm in 2005, Kickstarter began making it much more realistic in the post-2009 world for entrepreneurs to make their dreams a reality, and Virtual Reality has essentially made it possible since 2015 to bring your projects to the big screen (theater apps are very immersive and true-to-life).

5. Floppy disk were still very much alive and well; the last time I used one myself was for my Senior year high school exams in 2006. The fact that 4.4 MB devices were still commonly used for much of the 2000s definitely feels a bit old and dusty. Unless I'm missing something, nothing is measured in megabytes anymore; even the very smallest form factors provide tens of gigabytes.

6. You want Artificial Intelligence to do anything cool or meaningful? Sorry, try again in 10 years... oh wait, that's a bit too soon also. Make it twelve or thirteen. I guess you could ask Babelfish to translate some foreign writing for you, but you could also just ask your two year old nephew to scribble on a sheet of paper to much the same effect.

7. Message boards were much more skeletal and barebones. Message boards in 2000 tended to have an avatar limit of either 25x25 or 50x50, assuming that they were even available at all - they were a new feature at this time and many forums didn't have them. Outside of avatars and signatures, it was fairly rare for anyone to embed images into posts at all prior to 2005 or so (at least in my experience; I personally didn't sign up for Photobucket until later in 2005). I honestly can't think of a single time during my middle school years where someone posted an image on a forum, and they weren't much more common for the vast duration of high school either. The capability certainly existed, but it wasn't used nearly as often; the message boards I used were all very close to text-only until image sharing suddenly became more prominent around 2005. Avatars and signatures did become more colorful and advanced before this point, though - the first time I remember seeing an animated avatar was in 2003, which was an animation of this one guy struggling to remove a sword from a stone and pulling it out with so much force that he rolled down a nearby hill, and by 2004 gif avatars and signatures weren't uncommon or out-of-place at all.

8. Whenever 2000 began, the solar power capacity for the entire world could be measured in megawatts. By the end of the year, the world's solar capacity reached one gigawatt for the first time, but that's still a quaint and paltry amount when here in 2017, twenty-two countries have more solar power than what existed in the entire world during 2000. 2017 China alone beats 2000 Earth by almost 80 times.

9. Despite being important enough to business that many feared Y2K would leave the economy in ruins, the internet played an infinitely smaller role in daily life. You used it sometimes to do research for school, download music, and send emails. Sure, there were some who used it more extensively (I was such a person myself, growing attached to the internet very quickly whenever I first used it at 11), but that sentence sums things up for the average person well enough. Here in 2017 and of course for many years before this, home is a place where you can perform many daily and societal tasks remotely. Paying your bills and going to school or work from the comfort of your own home are very commonplace, everyday things by this point. The world of 2000 was much more physical, with home closer to being just a place to relax and unwind. In order to actually 'accomplish' things, you had to leave home and go interact with the outside world for virtually everything, whether that be working, going to school, shopping, paying bills, going to therapy sessions or other kinds of appointments, etc. Some of these things were certainly already possible in 2000, but the normal John and Jane wasn't aware of them, and many of the services which did exist were much more limited than they are today; Amazon existed in 2000 and was very nice for what it was, but it was still a far cry from the service we know today where you can order virtually anything.

10. This might be a weak one to end things off with, but I need to wrap this up; Solid State Drives weren't a thing which existed at all in 2000 on the consumer level. The first consumer devices to include SSDs were released in 2008, and even then there was only a very small handful which offered them. The 2000s were almost purely an HDD decade. The 2010s are the crossover decade where both are prominent at the same time, and the 2020s should be where HDDs die out and SSDs become the standard.

I can come back sometime to do more, but I think that's enough to get this thread off to a start. It's unfortunate that none of those are medical related, but I do expect the 20s and 30s to be to medicine what the 10s have been to AI.
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#6
LWFlouisa

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I'll aim for about 10 to start things off. I'm sure a lot of these will be related to computers and the internet; the beginning of the internet is kind of like the advent of electricity in that it's just not one giant change, but dozens and dozens of small, moderate, and large changes.

Let's see.

1. At the beginning of 2000, there were probably only three computers in the entire world that could be measured in teraflops (the November 1999 TOP500 list has three such computers, and January 2000 was right around the corner). Needless to say, this is insanely weak by modern standards. By the end of 2018, it's entirely possible that the TOP500 will be petaflop computers only since one petaflop of power will only cost around $40,000 by the end of 2017.

2. Whenever the 2000s began, barely more than four percent of the global population had an internet connection. By December 2000, that number fell just short of six. If you had your own internet connection in 2000, you were part of the lucky few far as the overall world goes. You were even part of the minority in America, since the 50 percent penetration mark wasn't reached until 2001. Very different story in 2017, the year where those who don't have the internet finally become a minority on a worldwide scale (a very large minority, granted, but still... even at the 'business as usual' rate of 3 to 4 percent per year, the global percentage of those with a connection would be around 60 percent by the beginning of the 2020s, and in the 80s or 90s by the decade's end).

3. The Gameboy Color was still in its prime, the Gameboy Advance not coming out until the next year. Graphically, the Gameboy Color fell shy of the original Famicom from 1983, meaning that the 2000 videogame world was still somewhat tethered to the 1980s. Whenever the major, official companies with millions or billions to burn turn out graphics like this, and it's a completely sincere and authentic effort rather than some kind of retro throwback, you know you've entered a different kind of world.

4. kjaggard mentioned the concept of a read-write society once, where regular people have more control over media and the general flow of society. In 2000, some areas were certainly more democratized than they were a few years prior, namely far as pure text-related stuff goes: you could publish news or your own personal fiction online, and you could make primitive videogames that were somewhere between the 8-bit and 16-bit eras at best. Here in 2017, far more domains have joined that group. Youtube democratized things in the video realm in 2005, Kickstarter began making it much more realistic in the post-2009 world for entrepreneurs to make their dreams a reality, and Virtual Reality has essentially made it possible since 2015 to bring your projects to the big screen (theater apps are very immersive and true-to-life).

5. Floppy disk were still very much alive and well; the last time I used one myself was for my Senior year high school exams in 2006. The fact that 4.4 MB devices were still commonly used for much of the 2000s definitely feels a bit old and dusty. Unless I'm missing something, nothing is measured in megabytes anymore; even the very smallest form factors provide tens of gigabytes.

6. You want Artificial Intelligence to do anything cool or meaningful? Sorry, try again in 10 years... oh wait, that's a bit too soon also. Make it twelve or thirteen. I guess you could ask Babelfish to translate some foreign writing for you, but you could also just ask your two year old nephew to scribble on a sheet of paper to much the same effect.

7. Message boards were much more skeletal and barebones. Message boards in 2000 tended to have an avatar limit of either 25x25 or 50x50, assuming that they were even available at all - they were a new feature at this time and many forums didn't have them. Outside of avatars and signatures, it was fairly rare for anyone to embed images into posts at all prior to 2005 or so (at least in my experience; I personally didn't sign up for Photobucket until later in 2005). I honestly can't think of a single time during my middle school years where someone posted an image on a forum, and they weren't much more common for the vast duration of high school either. The capability certainly existed, but it wasn't used nearly as often; the message boards I used were all very close to text-only until image sharing suddenly became more prominent around 2005. Avatars and signatures did become more colorful and advanced before this point, though - the first time I remember seeing an animated avatar was in 2003, which was an animation of this one guy struggling to remove a sword from a stone and pulling it out with so much force that he rolled down a nearby hill, and by 2004 gif avatars and signatures weren't uncommon or out-of-place at all.

8. Whenever 2000 began, the solar power capacity for the entire world could be measured in megawatts. By the end of the year, the world's solar capacity reached one gigawatt for the first time, but that's still a quaint and paltry amount when here in 2017, twenty-two countries have more solar power than what existed in the entire world during 2000. 2017 China alone beats 2000 Earth by almost 80 times.

9. Despite being important enough to business that many feared Y2K would leave the economy in ruins, the internet played an infinitely smaller role in daily life. You used it sometimes to do research for school, download music, and send emails. Sure, there were some who used it more extensively (I was such a person myself, growing attached to the internet very quickly whenever I first used it at 11), but that sentence sums things up for the average person well enough. Here in 2017 and of course for many years before this, home is a place where you can perform many daily and societal tasks remotely. Paying your bills and going to school or work from the comfort of your own home are very commonplace, everyday things by this point. The world of 2000 was much more physical, with home closer to being just a place to relax and unwind. In order to actually 'accomplish' things, you had to leave home and go interact with the outside world for virtually everything, whether that be working, going to school, shopping, paying bills, going to therapy sessions or other kinds of appointments, etc. Some of these things were certainly already possible in 2000, but the normal John and Jane wasn't aware of them, and many of the services which did exist were much more limited than they are today; Amazon existed in 2000 and was very nice for what it was, but it was still a far cry from the service we know today where you can order virtually anything.

10. This might be a weak one to end things off with, but I need to wrap this up; Solid State Drives weren't a thing which existed at all in 2000 on the consumer level. The first consumer devices to include SSDs were released in 2008, and even then there was only a very small handful which offered them. The 2000s were almost purely an HDD decade. The 2010s are the crossover decade where both are prominent at the same time, and the 2020s should be where HDDs die out and SSDs become the standard.

I can come back sometime to do more, but I think that's enough to get this thread off to a start. It's unfortunate that none of those are medical related, but I do expect the 20s and 30s to be to medicine what the 10s have been to AI.

 

I find this interesting, as I was using thumb drive just about when they first came out. I didn't even know people still used floppy disks.


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#7
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MP3 Players in the Year 2000 Were Not So Good (But We Still Loved Them)

This is the Creative Nomad Jukebox from the year 2000. It may have been shaped like a CD player to mentally ease technophobes, but it actually had a 6GB hard drive on board. And boy did we love it.
That's not to say that this thing was great—because it wasn't; not by today's standards. It had only a USB 1.1 connection, so uploading all 6GB worth of music took hours and hours. Imagine filling up a 1TB hard drive over a USB 2 connection today, if that gives you any idea of how long the process was. Oh, and it cost $420.
 
But you know what? It actually a pretty decent player for the year 2000. The 6GB is adequate even now (the lowest iPod Nano today has 8GB), and that 8GB of 5-minute skip protection was good enough for continuous music most of the time, except when you were off-roading or running away from cougars.

NEnECiz.jpg

So let's talk about mp3 players for a moment. Back in the early '00s, they were all the rage. They were The Future™ of portable music. My aunt still has an authentic mp3 player from around 2001. 
It looks something like this:
yK05weR.jpg
 
And I think it holds about 50 songs? She used to frequent the gym (she still does, actually), so back in the 2000s, a portable media player like this was perfect. 
 
 




Picking the right MP3 player
These days, there are options for everyone in compact digital audio.
January 2, 2003: 5:22 PM EST

They're everywhere - on the bus, at the gym. Wherever people congregate, they're listening to MP3 players. And there's a good chance each person is using a different make or model. At last count, there were well more than 100 different players out there. So picking one can be, shall we say, a challenge. But if you know what you're looking for, you'll be able to eliminate many lesser models right off the bat.
 
The first thing you need to know is how much music you want to put on your player. This can get a bit confusing, so pay attention. A good rule of thumb is that tunes recorded at so-called "CD quality" (128Kbps, aka the bit rate) will take about 1MB of space for each minute of music. A five minute song takes up about 5MB. The same song recorded at 192Kbps, which gives higher sound quality, will take up more than 7MB of space.
 

The Purist
If you're looking for big space, there's the Nomad Jukebox 3 ($500) from Creative Labs. It has an enormous 40GB hard drive, which the company claims can store 5,000 songs. For audiophiles who record at the device's highest bit rate (320Kbps) that number drops significantly. Personally, even though I don't have that much music that I really like, it's nice to know the device has the capacity to handle it if my kids want to add, say, the soundtrack from Harry Potter.

Home and Away
The Apple iPod is the gem of today's portable MP3 players and comes in three configurations for the Mac and the PC: a 5GB player that holds 1,000 songs ($299), a 10GB version, which holds 2,000 ($399) and a 20GB version that holds up to 4,000 ($499). It's small and amazingly easy to use. But the thing that sets the device apart from other players is its 32MB cache, or short-term memory, which stores 20 minutes of music. Since music is stored in the cache, the iPod isn't bothered by bumps or other movement. For a portable, that's a big deal. The iPod has 20 presets for equalization, so you can adjust the sound depending on what type of music you're listening to, whether it's jazz, rock, or classical. It even has software that allows you to store contacts and keep a calendar.

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#8
LWFlouisa

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I still want to find one like the one I had, where you can record your own voice directly on it. So you can use it for audio chatting, exchanging the thumb drive as if it were a small computer: and these days it kind of is.


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#9
libertyX

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We've seen technology unravels so fast and so multidimentional that it's hart to predict what we still might expect. If in 2000's you would never think that things like https://getcasinobonus.net/ would appear and Vegas would be basically in everyone's home, or that cars would be charged from a simple plugger. So i don't know, flying cars maybe



#10
rennerpetey

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We've seen technology unravels so fast and so multidimentional that it's hart to predict what we still might expect. If in 2000's you would never think that things like https://getcasinobonus.net/ would appear and Vegas would be basically in everyone's home, or that cars would be charged from a simple plugger. So i don't know, flying cars maybe

Blatantly obvious advertising is blatantly obvious.

 

Lol, literally 4/5 of this person's posts are cleverly(sarcasm) advertising some casino site.


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Pope Francis said that atheists are still eligible to go to heaven, to return the favor, atheists said that popes are still eligible to go into a void of nothingness.


#11
Unity

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Wind energy has also undergone a revolution since then. It would be cool if someone could post some stats or a graph.

https://www.google.c...he-upswing/amp/

Says prices fell by an order of magnitude since the 80s

Also, I hope negative emissions technologies that suck carbon from the atmosphere undergo a large revolution by 2045 or so. Keep an eye out for technologies like this:

https://news.vice.co...ed-it-to-plants

Another area of development is Battery Technology for cars such as those developed by Elon Musk the same technology is being deployed by companies like Walmart in order to reduce costs for electricity use in their stores

https://www.energy-s...ngs-for-walmart

https://www.google.c...eatures-2016-11
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#12
BasilBerylium

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We've seen technology unravels so fast and so multidimentional that it's hart to predict what we still might expect. If in 2000's you would never think that things like https://getcasinobonus.net/ would appear and Vegas would be basically in everyone's home, or that cars would be charged from a simple plugger. So i don't know, flying cars maybe

gtfo.



#13
Alislaws

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We've seen technology unravels so fast and so multidimentional that it's hart to predict what we still might expect. If in 2000's you would never think that things like https://getcasinobonus.net/ would appear and Vegas would be basically in everyone's home, or that cars would be charged from a simple plugger. So i don't know, flying cars maybe

if no one clicks the link they'll stop.

 

That said this one actually tried to engage with the topic, (using coherent sentences even!!) while simultaneously advertising the casino.

 

This is a huge step up from most spam advertising!



#14
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We've seen technology unravels so fast and so multidimentional that it's hart to predict what we still might expect. If in 2000's you would never think that things like https://getcasinobonus.net/ would appear and Vegas would be basically in everyone's home, or that cars would be charged from a simple plugger. So i don't know, flying cars maybe

if no one clicks the link they'll stop.

 

That said this one actually tried to engage with the topic, (using coherent sentences even!!) while simultaneously advertising the casino.

 

This is a huge step up from most spam advertising!

 

Is it spam anymore if it engages the topic?


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#15
Yuli Ban

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^ Invite such "intelligence spam" and it'll only grow to the point where you look at serious posts and spam posts and not see the difference, which is why I implore you to check out this neat service: https://www.spamstopshere.com/! Premium Spam Filter with Zero-Hour Virus Protection! No Custom Tuning, Blacklists or Whitelists Required! Stop spam and malicious email (viruses, trojan horses, Cryptolocker, etc.) in the Cloud, before they damage your business. SpamStopsHere™ provides superior protection from email threats, even for the most demanding customers who cannot afford to lose email; like attorneys, doctors, hospitals, financial firms, manufacturing and your business. SpamStopsHere blocks 99.5% of spam with fewer than 0.001% false positives and comes with our brilliant 24/7/365 live support. It is a "set it and forget it" email blocker with nearly 100% customer satisfaction. Every forum needs it!


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#16
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I see what you did there.


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#17
Raklian

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^ Invite such "intelligence spam" and it'll only grow to the point where you look at serious posts and spam posts and not see the difference, which is why I implore you to check out this neat service: https://www.spamstopshere.com/! Premium Spam Filter with Zero-Hour Virus Protection! No Custom Tuning, Blacklists or Whitelists Required! Stop spam and malicious email (viruses, trojan horses, Cryptolocker, etc.) in the Cloud, before they damage your business. SpamStopsHere™ provides superior protection from email threats, even for the most demanding customers who cannot afford to lose email; like attorneys, doctors, hospitals, financial firms, manufacturing and your business. SpamStopsHere blocks 99.5% of spam with fewer than 0.001% false positives and comes with our brilliant 24/7/365 live support. It is a "set it and forget it" email blocker with nearly 100% customer satisfaction. Every forum needs it!

 

Yuli, I know you're a genuine member and all but I'm afraid of clicking on the link you provided.


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#18
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I think the biggest change since 2000 is the way we communicate with others and share our stories. I remember the old days I had to send letters to my friend to tell her about my day, waited for 2 weeks to get the response but already forgot what I wrote  her  :o  Now, just a few clicks with email.

The same when it comes to texting. I had to use my portable texting machine, sometimes it didn't even work. Now we have Messenger, Whatsapp, Viber, Wechat (for Chinese), to get such instant messages. And Snapchat to share images and videos via text, cool ha?. Oh btw talking about Snapchat, I'm quite curious about its Snapchat glasses, which I recently read about. Isn't it a way to record video live for your friends and family, just like Livestream tool on Facebook? But instead using a phone you use your glasses.


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