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Africa News and Discussions

Kenya Ethiopia Sudan Somalia Eritria East Africa Famine Famine Relief International Aid

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#1
Yuli Ban

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Famine declared in South Sudan

Famine has been declared in parts of South Sudan, where UN agencies warned on Monday that war and a collapsing economy have left 100,000 people facing starvation.
A further 1 million people were classified as being on the brink of famine, according to the World Food Programme (WFP) and other UN bodies. Unimpeded humanitarian access was urgently needed to reverse “an escalating catastrophe”, they added.
The famine is the first to be declared since 2011 in Somalia, where more than a quarter of a million people are estimated to have died between October 2010 and April 2012.
The UN has warned that three other countries - Yemen, Somalia and Nigeria - are at risk of famine.

A famine has been declared in parts of South Sudan, the first to be announced in any part of the world in six years. The government and the United Nations report that some 100,000 people are facing starvation, with a million more on the brink of famine
 

I swear that central Africa's going to become a cool bed of stability by the late 2020's. But there's still a long way to go. Only a few African nations have really become "highly developed", and that was after decades of stable growth. None of those massive wars, genocides, famines, and outside interventions fucking everything up. Like Seychelles and Namibia.

 

I'll consider making a general Africa News and Discussions thread later.


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#2
Sciencerocks

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I sure as hell hope they aint waiting on America to help them...That isn't going to happen.

 

Sudan needs to invest in water infrastructure big time.


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#3
Zaphod

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The suffering and death from the civil war has already been horrendous. 

 

If only we used some of our drones to deliver food/aid rather than just blowing people up.



#4
Yuli Ban

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It's not food we have to send. We've been sending food for decades. Warlords and corrupt governments keep stealing it, taking 90%, and distributing the other 10% among hungry populations to keep firm control on their nations. Africa, Asia, and Oceania didn't experience the industrial revolution until upwards of two centuries after it began in Europe. There are some countries where certain regions still have not experienced the industrial revolution. As far as I know, Malawi and Laos are the absolute least industrialized nations on Earth. 

Oceania had the benefit of white nations (who were already industrialized) planting a foothold there. Asia had a bad period in the 18th and 19th century when Europe tried to colonize it, but Europe failed hard and just awakened Asia once again. Since they have stable governments (for the most part), it makes sense they'd finally explode into true growth. 

You need  a stable society. It also helps if you have a stable climate and a fundamental culture that exalts hard work and profit, which Europe and Asia do have. Africa has a culture that's just as pro-growth as Eurasian ones, but Africa as a whole has undergone extreme strife since roughly the 17th century. It's just so resource rich, and industrialized nations wanted in on that. Since Africa was already on a downswing, there was no chance of them putting up a decent resistance. 

 

We already know that massive total wars cause societal regression and economic depression. The South after the US Civil War, Russia after their civil war, Europe after the Napoleonic wars and the World Wars, the Taiping Rebellion and various other wars in China, the Mongolian invasion of Persia and Arabia... I bet some don't even know what wars were fought in Africa in the 19th and 20th century. Just 20 years ago, there was a Great War in Africa that killed upwards of 3 to 6 million people. They don't have MAD down there, so they are free to fight as many wars as they want. If an African power developed nuclear weapons, and another African state developed equally powerful nukes, all of a sudden, the guns will fall silent. Governments may still be corrupt, but they'll become much more stable.

 

We're not there yet.


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#5
Zaphod

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Whilst I agree that sending food will not do anything much to treat the root of the cause, it will still have a significant impact on preventing imminent mass starvation. The problem is these countries are too dangerous for aid workers to enter and food drops rarely target enough areas. South Sudan is huge and many isolated villages are separated by war zones. Yes some of this food will be taken by the military forces, but if it is small quantities distributed on a fine scale it becomes minimised. Normally food/aid is centrally distributed at military bases/refugee camps/airports/government buildings etc. . This makes them very easy to steal or unfairly distribute. If done wisely I do think drones could remove many of these issues. I am basing my view on one of my neighbors who works for the British government for humanitarian aid.



#6
wjfox

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Ethiopia, humanitarian groups say food aid for 7.8 million to run out

Sat Jun 10, 2017 | 9:59am EDT

Ethiopia will run out of emergency food aid for 7.8 million people hit by severe drought by the end of this month, the government and humanitarian groups said.

Successive failed rains blamed by meteorologists on fluctuations in ocean temperatures known as the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) have created a series of severe back-to-back droughts in Ethiopia and the Horn of Africa region.

In Ethiopia, the number of people now critically short of food is expected to rise by at least two million by next month, according to figures compiled by the government and its humanitarian partners.

Donors, international aid groups and the government say existing food aid for the current 7.8 million will run out as funds are critically short this year with Ethiopia receiving slightly more than half of the $930 million to meet requirements until July.

"We are in a dire situation," John Aylieff, the World Food Programme's representative in Ethiopia, said on Friday during a field trip to Warder in southeast Ethiopia, one of Ethiopia's hardest-hit areas.

Read more: http://www.reuters.c...SKBN1910M0?il=0


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#7
caltrek

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These days, I am trying very hard to resist the impulse to start new threads.  Still, I think a good case can be made for this issue. I heard somewhere that in the United States about fifty percent of all food goes to waste. That is, it is never consumed by either animals or humans (unless you count microbes).  So one thing we can all do is to find ways to cut the waste of food. That would also have the added benefit of helping our own bank account out.

 

With that said, on to the introductory story.

 

Famine in East Africa

 

https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2011/07/famine-in-east-africa/100115/

 

 

 

 

With East Africa facing its worst drought in 60 years, affecting more than 11 million people, the United Nations has declared a famine in the region for the first time in a generation. Overcrowded refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia are receiving some 3,000 new refugees every day, as families flee from famine-stricken and war-torn areas. The meager food and water that used to support millions in the Horn of Africa is disappearing rapidly, and families strong enough to flee for survival must travel up to a hundred miles, often on foot, hoping to make it to a refugee center, seeking food and aid. Many do not survive the trip. Officials warn that 800,000 children could die of malnutrition across the East African nations of Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Kenya. Aid agencies are frustrated by many crippling situations: the slow response of Western governments, local governments and terrorist groups blocking access, terrorist and bandit attacks, and anti-terrorism laws that restrict who the aid groups can deal with -- not to mention the massive scale of the current crisis. Below are a few images from the past several weeks in East Africa. One immediate way to help is to text "FOOD" to UNICEF (864233) to donate $10, enough to feed a child for 10 days, more ways to help listed here

East_Africa_regions_map.png


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#8
Yuli Ban

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Just gonna combine a few threads here...


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#9
caltrek

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I have to admit, I am having a hard time focusing on this issue. It is simply so depressing.

 

The World's Largest Humanitarian Crisis Is Basically Being Blacked Out by Western Media

 

 

http://www.alternet....nitarian-crisis

 

Extract:

 

Yemen, Somalia, South Sudan and Nigeria are each the throes of a man-made famine, with twenty million people starving to death. No humanitarian intervention has been possible. There has been little concern from the powers that be. Pictures on social media of rail-thin children evoke pity, but no action. The UN has only been able to raise 43 per cent of the $6.27 billion it urgently needs to prevent the famine in these four countries. The United States has contributed $1.9 billion to this effort. But this is a fraction of what the US arms industry has been making by selling arms to Saudi Arabia, resupplying it as it bombs Yemen into famine. Most recently, when US President Trump visited Saudi Arabia, the US sealed a $110 billion arms deal with Saudi Arabia. This deal is in addition to a $350 billion arms sales agreement over ten years.

 

In other words, the United States is fueling a conflict that has resulted in war crimes and famine. It is responsible – by proxy – for this devastation.

In 2016, a UN panel of experts concluded that the Saudi war on Yemen documented grave violations of human rights that were ‘widespread and systematic.’ What is most chilling in that report is the documentation of Saudi strikes on transportation routes (both sea and air), storage facilities for holding food (including an Oxfam warehouse for food aid) and a water project funded by the European Union. The panel noted that it ‘documented three coalition attacks on local food and agricultural production sites.’ In 2015, Saudi aircraft destroyed the cranes and warehouses in the Yemeni port city of Hudaydah. With 90 per cent of Yemen’s food imported, the destruction of this infrastructure has been catastrophic. These strikes by the Saudis on food transportation and storage as well as on water purification plants have produced famine conditions in Yemen.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#10
bgates276

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It's not food we have to send. We've been sending food for decades. Warlords and corrupt governments keep stealing it, taking 90%, and distributing the other 10% among hungry populations to keep firm control on their nations. Africa, Asia, and Oceania didn't experience the industrial revolution until upwards of two centuries after it began in Europe. There are some countries where certain regions still have not experienced the industrial revolution. As far as I know, Malawi and Laos are the absolute least industrialized nations on Earth. 

Oceania had the benefit of white nations (who were already industrialized) planting a foothold there. Asia had a bad period in the 18th and 19th century when Europe tried to colonize it, but Europe failed hard and just awakened Asia once again. Since they have stable governments (for the most part), it makes sense they'd finally explode into true growth. 

You need  a stable society. It also helps if you have a stable climate and a fundamental culture that exalts hard work and profit, which Europe and Asia do have. Africa has a culture that's just as pro-growth as Eurasian ones, but Africa as a whole has undergone extreme strife since roughly the 17th century. It's just so resource rich, and industrialized nations wanted in on that. Since Africa was already on a downswing, there was no chance of them putting up a decent resistance. 

 

We already know that massive total wars cause societal regression and economic depression. The South after the US Civil War, Russia after their civil war, Europe after the Napoleonic wars and the World Wars, the Taiping Rebellion and various other wars in China, the Mongolian invasion of Persia and Arabia... I bet some don't even know what wars were fought in Africa in the 19th and 20th century. Just 20 years ago, there was a Great War in Africa that killed upwards of 3 to 6 million people. They don't have MAD down there, so they are free to fight as many wars as they want. If an African power developed nuclear weapons, and another African state developed equally powerful nukes, all of a sudden, the guns will fall silent. Governments may still be corrupt, but they'll become much more stable.

 

We're not there yet.

 

I think it would be a mistake to assume that countries simply 'experience' an industrial revolution. I don't think it's just something that happens to you, but one in which you actively make happen. In the West, the industrial revolution was likely precipitated by past events, such as the agricultural, bronze, iron age, etc.  in addition to book's like Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations. Once all the pieces were in place, it was very much driven by those at the top of society (Ie. academics, intellectuals; super ambitious industrialists like Carnegie, Rockefeller), very much the way there were leaders in the information age, and those who are now at the forefront of A.I. It also couldn't have happened without the work ethic of everyone else in society.  And here in lies a problem. If African nations take a passive and mentally lazy approach, thinking it will just spontaneously happen to them (because Whites and East Asians are 'lucky' or privileged) or that others will make it happen for them, they will always be in the position they are in. 



#11
Yuli Ban

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^ Mind reading my post again? I don't think you did.


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#12
caltrek

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^^^Maybe I am not understanding bgates276 post correctly, but I think he was trying to build on what you (Yuli Ban) said and not necessarily trying to refute your comments. I definitely did not  like the "mentally lazy" comment, but I did not see bgates276 comments and your comments as mutually irreconcilable.  Am I missing something? 


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#13
Yuli Ban

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^ He was going off the idea that I said Africa had not experienced the Industrial Revolution. I said that there were certain regions that may as well have not experienced the Industrial Revolution, and one of those places is the African nation of Malawi because of how poor it is. 

 

He seemed to imply that Africa was trying to be lazy and mooch off the West and East to become industrialized without actually putting in the effort or having the drive to do so, but my comment was explaining that Africa's been in the throes of chaos and disorder for upwards of two centuries now, with a World War-esque conflict and two genocides having occurred just in the past two decades. No continent can become "Developed" or "First World" in that situation, no matter how much of an industrialist drive it may have.
For example: the World Wars and the Great Depression all but obliterated industrial Europe, and the Century of Humiliation plunged China back into post-Roman times. Europe only recovered because of extremely high investment from America and the USSR; if that had not happened, there's no doubt in my mind most European nations today would have only just been able to reach a "Second World" tier and that Spain and the UK would be the only "powerhouses" on the continent. China is only just now returning to extreme prominence on the global stage, prominence it lost in the 1830s and never got back. The Taiping Rebellion killed as many as, if not more than, World War II did in Europe, and no one's forgetting the Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolutions anytime soon.

 

I even outright said in my little essay that the African work ethic is on par with Europeans', Americans', and East Asians'. There's nothing 'mentally lazy' about them. It's easy to say that they want to be moochers when they can't get their shit together in the throes of famine and war and you're coming off centuries of peace and relative stability. It's obvious that large swaths of the population would have an IQ of ~70 when they can barely get a subpar meal once a week. 

Hell, he even said that everything has to be right for it to happen. And things haven't been right in much of Africa outside of a few high-income regions.


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#14
caltrek

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Well, I am not going to make any more comments about whether you guys are arguing with each other or agreeing with each other.  At this point, I guess bgates276 needs to weigh in and explain him(or her)self.

 

It does strike me that the issue of industrialization does involve more than "being lazy" versus "being productive".  Industrialization can be a very traumatic process, and I am not all that sure I would condemn a culture for hesitating to take step in that direction.  It can mean overturning of some very rich cultural traditions and heritage.  It can also mean a great increase in alienated labor.  Living off the land does involve great risk when crops fail.  So when a population is living on the bubble, disaster can occur when that bubble pops.   Still, I think in one sense we are all living on a bubble.  It is just that so far scientific advance has allowed agricultural productivity to outrace collapse.  Diversity of geographic assets is also important.  So, being on the periphery of a global system is certainly more dangerous than living at the center.  The center being defined by such things as communication networks, military hegemony, etc.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#15
caltrek

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a216467c-30df-4951-afe2-13a7ceca6a48-ori


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#16
bgates276

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Well, I am not going to make any more comments about whether you guys are arguing with each other or agreeing with each other.  At this point, I guess bgates276 needs to weigh in and explain him(or her)self.

 

It does strike me that the issue of industrialization does involve more than "being lazy" versus "being productive".  Industrialization can be a very traumatic process, and I am not all that sure I would condemn a culture for hesitating to take step in that direction.  It can mean overturning of some very rich cultural traditions and heritage.  It can also mean a great increase in alienated labor.  Living off the land does involve great risk when crops fail.  So when a population is living on the bubble, disaster can occur when that bubble pops.   Still, I think in one sense we are all living on a bubble.  It is just that so far scientific advance has allowed agricultural productivity to outrace collapse.  Diversity of geographic assets is also important.  So, being on the periphery of a global system is certainly more dangerous than living at the center.  The center being defined by such things as communication networks, military hegemony, etc.

 

See, I did not say they were necessarily lazy. I said 'mentally lazy', and I do believe there is a difference between the two. Someone may have ambitions, but unless they can make definite plans, putting everything down on paper, setting deadlines, and taking decisive actions, then goals end up  being nothing more than dreams or procrastination. So I think they simply need to be more proactive. For what it's worth, I think a lot of us, even in the west, are also often guilty of making plans that never get actualized. The most obvious example are New Year's resolutions that go by the wayside.  And yes, I agree, when you are down on the ground, sometimes it is hard to get back on your feet. My analysis was more based upon the semantics of the term, experience, than anything else, and how using such a term could affect one's psychology and motivations. I'm not saying that is absolutely how they think, but if that is the mindset, that could set them back.



#17
Yuli Ban

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Congo: 250 people killed in ethnic based massacres in the DRC, say UN

The UN says more than 250 people, including 62 children, have been killed in attacks in the Democratic Republic of Congo that are "taking on an increasing and disturbing ethnic dimension".
 
In a report based on interviews with almost 100 victims, the UN's Human Rights Office said it believed the DRC government to be complicit in the massacres in the south-western Kasai province.
 
At least 80 mass graves have been identified in the region, the UN said, and investigators believe the abuses in the most recent flare-up of violence could amount to crimes under international law.

"Taking on an increasing and disturbing ethnic dimension" says Reddit.


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#18
caltrek

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 South Africa’s Zuma No-Confidence Vote

 

https://nonprofitqua...onfidence-vote/

 

Extract:

 

On August 7th, thousands marched in the streets of Cape Town, South Africa, in protest of the next day’s no-confidence vote against President Zuma. In an unprecedented display of unity, among them were representatives from the civil sector coalition,   #UniteBehindmembers of political parties and unions; and supporters of the recently formed FutureSA, an organization of the country’s elite and influential. Marchers also included frustrated and fed-up citizens.

 

The vote was widely perceived as a referendum on Zuma and, to a lesser degree, the ANC, revealing fissures in today’s perception of the party as opposed to its history and legacy. Zuma’s alleged and proven transgressions are well documented. He had become a costly source of embarrassment to South Africa and the ANC. His eight-year reign led to South Africa’s economy going into a fast freefall. After his abrupt firing of the widely respected and highly competent Minister of Finance, Standard and Poor’s, in another show of no confidence, reduced their bonds to junk bond status.

 

 

On August 8th, Parliament voted by secret ballot, the first such vote in South Africa’s history. The decision was controversial and opposed by the masses and the ANC. Zuma and the Speaker of the National Assembly opposed it, seeking an open ballot as outlined in the constitution; the ANC wanted the same, only their goal was to insure loyalty. The procedure gained momentum when members of civil society, in an effort to “call the question,” switched their support to a secret ballot. Seeing the “winds of change,” the Speaker acquiesced…

 

In the final tally, 198 members of Parliament supported the president and 177 voted for censure. Censure needed 201, and analysis finds that the pro no-confidence side received at least thirty-five ANC votes. Supporters were jubilant in their win. Critics…took some encouragement from the fact that the rising presence of ANC votes could signal the beginning of the end of Zuma’s death grip on the party.

 

 

Zuma’s reign is coming to a close, as the ANC holds its convention in December and will vote in new leadership that will not be Jacob Zuma. However, Zuma, in anticipation of possible criminal charges and the need for pardons, is promoting one of his six wives as a potential presidential candidate.

 

Jacob+Zuma+ecOZ622kpSPm.jpg

Jacob Zuma

Source: Getty Images


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#19
caltrek

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Kenya Waits to Hear Final Results of Already Disputed Vote

 

https://www.courthou...-disputed-vote/

 

Introduction:

 

Kenyans on Friday awaited the official results of Tuesday’s disputed election as hundreds of riot police patrolled Nairobi’s central business district and opposition supporters burned tires and blocked roads in several areas.

 

Kenya’s election commission has rejected claims by opposition leader Raila Odinga that its database was hacked and results manipulated against him, and that an unofficial tally confirms him as the winner. Provisional results show President Uhuru Kenyatta with a wide lead over the 72-year-old Odinga, who may be facing his last chance at the presidency after three unsuccessful attempts.

 

The election commission urged Kenyans to be patient and said it should have an update by mid-afternoon Friday, though the counting process has been repeatedly delayed. The long wait has increased tension in the East African economic power, though the commission by law has until Tuesday to announce the results.

 

The government urged citizens to return to work. Television and radio presenters echoed messages from the interior ministry saying the country was safe despite pockets of protests.

Opposition supporters burned tires and blocked roads in the Nairobi slum of Kibera and in Kisumu, a city in the southwest where Odinga has strong support. At least three people have been shot and killed during clashes between police and opposition supporters this week.

KenyaVote.jpg?resize=300%2C200

 

Supporters of President Uluru Kenyatta celebrate in anticipation of the announcement of the presidential election’s final results Friday , Aug. 11, 2017. 

(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#20
caltrek

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Tree Planting in West Africa

 

http://fairworldproj...rs-and-Soil.pdf

 

 

 

Deforestation and climate change have had a devastating impact on West Africa’s forests. That is why Alaffia launched their reforestation project in 2006. Since then, Alaffia product sales have funded the planting of 53,125 trees by Togolese farmers to help mitigate erosion and improve food security for their families. By joining forces with organizations such as the Global Shea Alliance, they are on track to expand their Reforestation Project to plant 250,000 seedlings over the next three years. Their mission is to “significantly and measurably improve shea tree populations and productivity, while protecting and improving the rights of women collectors to access shea kernels, trees and parklands.”

 

This tree-planting project is part of a larger vision of growing sustainable communities. Alaffia’s programs also include community-based trainings for rural farmers on the benefits of intercropping shadeadapted crops with shea trees, and on the impacts of reducing the cutting of shea trees for fuelwood or agricultural clearing. Instead, their Alternative Fuels Project offers resources for sustainable fuel alternatives, such as bio-gas and bio-oil, to reduce the demand for wood and charcoal. 

 

Alaffia Maternal Care Project

 

http://alaffia.com/empowerment/

 

 

 

Each year in West Africa, 160,000 women die due to complications with pregnancy and childbirth. Over her lifetime, an African woman has a 1 in 32 chance of dying in pregnancy or childbirth, compared to 1 in 2,400 in Europe (UNICEF, 2012). There are several reasons for the high maternal mortality rates in sub-Saharan Africa, including extreme poverty and inadequate infrastructure.

 

While the problem seems insurmountable, it is possible to save lives with basic health care and gender equality. In 2006, we started our Maternal Health Project following the World Health Organization’s recommendations for reducing maternal death rates. Our Maternal Health Project has two parts; The first is a direct approach to the immediate problem. Each year, we fund full pre- and postnatal care, including special and urgent needs, to women in rural Togo. Alaffia product sales have paid for the births of 4,463 babies in rural Togolese communities through the Togo Health Clinic system.

 

The Alaffia Women’s Clinic Project is the second part of our women’s health efforts. In 2007, we began to partner with local Togolese health clinics  to provide information and training on all women’s health issues, including nutrition, preventing female genital mutilation, and much more. We believe saving mothers is a necessary step in reducing poverty. When a mother dies, her surviving children’s nutrition & health suffer, and they are more likely to drop out of school, reducing their ability to rise out of poverty.

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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Kenya, Ethiopia, Sudan, Somalia, Eritria, East Africa, Famine, Famine Relief, International Aid

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