Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

These ads will disappear if you register on the forum

Photo

Can climate change be reversed?


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1
Bubble99

Bubble99

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 52 posts

Can climate change be reversed? Do you fear climate change? How much worse is climate change going to be?

 

The water level is on rise, antarctic ice is melting, green land and Iceland is melting!!

 

Hurricanes and floating is getting worse by the earth equator!!

 

How much worse is climate change going to be?



#2
Cartesian Logic

Cartesian Logic

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
You can't blame climate change for hurricanes every time hurricane season comes around. Reversal is wishful thinking, but reduction is best achieved by everyone doing their part. Work on minimizing your own waste and consumptions (reduce, reuse, recycle), vote at every level to push your own ideologies to ensure the effort gets put in at a larger scale, and spread awareness. Good luck!
  • Nerd likes this

#3
Pisiu369

Pisiu369

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 742 posts

You can't blame climate change for hurricanes every time hurricane season comes around. Reversal is wishful thinking, but reduction is best achieved by everyone doing their part. Work on minimizing your own waste and consumptions (reduce, reuse, recycle), vote at every level to push your own ideologies to ensure the effort gets put in at a larger scale, and spread awareness. Good luck!

Yes, thank you for saying it. It seems that every single time a bad storm or hurricane comes its quickly blamed on global warming/climate change.


  • Yuli Ban likes this

#4
Nerd

Nerd

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts

It would be nice if we could stop global warming and natural disasters, though. Sadly it's not possible.



#5
Omosoap

Omosoap

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 158 posts

Regardless of who blames what for what, the frustration for me is that people keep on building in spots that are extremely vulnerable to flooding etc. I mean, if the risk is high, why build there, unless you have the innovation of the Dutch, which many of these states do not have? Also, who cares if it's related to climate change, the fires are at least, and just because it's not due to climate change doesn't mean that we can sing a happy tune and go our merry way. We need to adapt to our changing world, both technologically and environmentally. I often feel like America has lost its mind, because just because climate change is a partisan issue, doesn't mean we can just make it go away. Sigh...and I'm the one that's crazy? You don't pretend there's no issue with something, you TALK about it. But, everyone is just blasting their brains with stupidity. Humanity....sometimes.


  • Nerd likes this

#6
Omosoap

Omosoap

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 158 posts

Also, what the heck were people thinking in building over wetlands. Those protect you from flooding idiots. This country is just nuts. I'm planning on getting out of this nuthouse in 6 years. I have zero hope for people actually having intelligence here. And, I'm in a state that is extra special, we had half of our students fail the istep. Nice, really nice. Glad to see your education is working out for you.


  • Nerd likes this

#7
wjfox

wjfox

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,970 posts
  • LocationLondon

 

Can climate change be reversed?

 

Under the current economic system, which makes infinite "growth" and profit maximisation the absolute priority, that seems unlikely. On a business-as-usual scenario, we are likely heading for 4-5°C of warming later this century, which is basically the end of modern civilisation. Leaving it to "the market" will ensure our destruction. The only real hope is some sort of people-led, global revolution to simultaneously:-

 

(a) trigger a massive worldwide effort to sequester greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and oceans;

(b) disempower the evil psychopaths whose insatiable greed has led us to this situation, and install new leaders with a better vision for humanity.

 

Unfortunately, given our past history, it's more likely we'll fall back into the same pattern of war and genocide, with increasing nationalism and isolationism as the climate breaks down and vast numbers of refugees begin to cross borders. You can see this beginning to happen already with Europe's refugee crisis.

 

The poorest countries will be hardest hit, and when the situation becomes desperate, they may resort to drastic measures. In his 2008 book, Climate Wars: The Fight for Survival as the World Overheats, Gwynne Dyer foresees a number of Asian governments choosing to unilaterally geo-engineer the atmosphere, by injecting sulfate aerosols using high altitude balloons. This backfires, however, creating a mini-Ice Age for a number of years afterwards, which is devastating to crop yields.

 

Sorry to say it – but frankly, it will take a miracle for us to make it through this century intact. We need to decarbonise totally, as fast as possible, and shift our economic system to one that is longer-term focused. Our current path is suicidal.



#8
Pisiu369

Pisiu369

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 742 posts
.


#9
Pisiu369

Pisiu369

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 742 posts

 

 

Can climate change be reversed?

 

Under the current economic system, which makes infinite "growth" and profit maximisation the absolute priority, that seems unlikely. On a business-as-usual scenario, we are likely heading for 4-5°C of warming later this century, which is basically the end of modern civilisation. Leaving it to "the market" will ensure our destruction. The only real hope is some sort of people-led, global revolution to simultaneously:-

 

(a) trigger a massive worldwide effort to sequester greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and oceans;

(b) disempower the evil psychopaths whose insatiable greed has led us to this situation, and install new leaders with a better vision for humanity.

 

Unfortunately, given our past history, it's more likely we'll fall back into the same pattern of war and genocide, with increasing nationalism and isolationism as the climate breaks down and vast numbers of refugees begin to cross borders. You can see this beginning to happen already with Europe's refugee crisis.

 

The poorest countries will be hardest hit, and when the situation becomes desperate, they may resort to drastic measures. In his 2008 book, Climate Wars: The Fight for Survival as the World Overheats, Gwynne Dyer foresees a number of Asian governments choosing to unilaterally geo-engineer the atmosphere, by injecting sulfate aerosols using high altitude balloons. This backfires, however, creating a mini-Ice Age for a number of years afterwards, which is devastating to crop yields.

 

Sorry to say it – but frankly, it will take a miracle for us to make it through this century intact. We need to decarbonise totally, as fast as possible, and shift our economic system to one that is longer-term focused. Our current path is suicidal.

 

 

So are you saying infinite growth and profit maximisation is bad altogether or is it only bad when it requires the usage of fossil fuels?



#10
Unity

Unity

    Information Organism

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,450 posts
https://www.technolo...ngineering/amp/

#11
Raklian

Raklian

    An Immortal In The Making

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,514 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

 

Unfortunately, given our past history, it's more likely we'll fall back into the same pattern of war and genocide, with increasing nationalism and isolationism as the climate breaks down and vast numbers of refugees begin to cross borders. You can see this beginning to happen already with Europe's refugee crisis.

 

 

Hence the need for a strong AI to keep us in check while supporting us. A government doesn't necessarily to have people running it. When one says people has to run the government, he commits a logical fallacy.


  • Yuli Ban likes this
What are you without the sum of your parts?

#12
Guyverman1990

Guyverman1990

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 735 posts

My dad told me that tossing giant asteroids into the atmosphere from space can force some of the Earth's heat from the atmosphere.



#13
Bubble99

Bubble99

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 52 posts

You can't blame climate change for hurricanes every time hurricane season comes around. Reversal is wishful thinking, but reduction is best achieved by everyone doing their part. Work on minimizing your own waste and consumptions (reduce, reuse, recycle), vote at every level to push your own ideologies to ensure the effort gets put in at a larger scale, and spread awareness. Good luck!

 

 Based on experts  floods, hurricanes,  tornadoes, fires and droughts are symptom of climate changed.

 

 

A new report finds climate change is likely impacting hurricane season in two contradictory ways.

The new research was published this week in  by Florida State georgraphy professor Jim Elsner and Namyoung Kang, deputy director of the National Typhoon Center in South Korea. The study finds that warmer ocean temperatures, caused by climate change, may be fueling stronger hurricanes, while at the same time, creating fewer storms.

"We're seeing fewer hurricanes, but the ones we do see are more intense," Elsner said. "When one comes, all hell can break loose."

In order for a tropical disturbance to develop, the conditions need to be just right. While that includes a moist and unstable atmosphere, as well as weak vertical wind shear, ocean temperatures are also very important. Sea-surface temperatures need to be warm -- usually greater than 80 degrees -- therefore, those warmer oceans would allow for stronger hurricanes and typhoons.

 

https://weather.com/...mber-hurricanes

 

 

symptom of climate changed.

 

https://climate.nasa.gov/evidence/

 

The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have decreased in mass. Data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment show Greenland lost 150 to 250 cubic kilometers (36 to 60 cubic miles) of ice per year between 2002 and 2006, while Antarctica lost about 152 cubic kilometers (36 cubic miles) of ice between 2002 and 2005.

 

 

Glaciers are retreating almost everywhere around the world — including in the Alps, Himalayas, Andes, Rockies, Alaska and Africa.

 

 

Satellite observations reveal that the amount of spring snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere has decreased over the past five decades and that the snow is melting earlier.
 
 
Global sea level rose about 8 inches in the last century. The rate in the last two decades, however, is nearly double that of the last century.
 
 
Both the extent and thickness of Arctic sea ice has declined rapidly over the last several decades.
 
 
The number of record high temperature events in the United States has been increasing, while the number of record low temperature events has been decreasing, since 1950. The U.S. has also witnessed increasing numbers of intense rainfall events.
 
Global climate is projected to continue to change over this century and beyond. The magnitude of climate change beyond the next few decades depends primarily on the amount of heat-trapping gases emitted globally, and how sensitive the Earth’s climate is to those emissions.
 
 
Because human-induced warming is superimposed on a naturally varying climate, the temperature rise has not been, and will not be, uniform or smooth across the country or over time.
 
 
Average U.S. precipitation has increased since 1900, but some areas have had increases greater than the national average, and some areas have had decreases. More winter and spring precipitation is projected for the northern United States, and less for the Southwest, over this century.

Projections of future climate over the U.S. suggest that the recent trend towards increased heavy precipitation events will continue. This trend is projected to occur even in regions where total precipitation is expected to decrease, such as the Southwest.
 
Droughts in the Southwest and heat waves (periods of abnormally hot weather lasting days to weeks) everywhere are projected to become more intense, and cold waves less intense everywhere.

Summer temperatures are projected to continue rising, and a reduction of soil moisture, which exacerbates heat waves, is projected for much of the western and central U.S. in summer. By the end of this century, what have been once-in-20-year extreme heat days (one-day events) are projected to occur every two or three years over most of the nation. 
 
 
The intensity, frequency and duration of North Atlantic hurricanes, as well as the frequency of the strongest (Category 4 and 5) hurricanes, have all increased since the early 1980s. The relative contributions of human and natural causes to these increases are still uncertain. Hurricane-associated storm intensity and rainfall rates are projected to increase as the climate continues to warm.
 
Global sea level has risen by about 8 inches since reliable record keeping began in 1880. It is projected to rise another 1 to 4 feet by 2100. This is the result of added water from melting land ice and the expansion of seawater as it warms.

In the next several decades, storm surges and high tides could combine with sea level rise and land subsidence to further increase flooding in many regions. Sea level rise will continue past 2100 because the oceans take a very long time to respond to warmer conditions at the Earth’s surface. Ocean waters will therefore continue to warm and sea level will continue to rise for many centuries at rates equal to or higher than those of the current century.  

 

The Arctic Ocean is expected to become essentially ice free in summer before mid-century.
 

The potential future effects of global climate change include more frequent wildfires, longer periods of drought in some regions and an increase in the number, duration and intensity of tropical storms. Credit: Left - Mellimage/Shutterstock.com, center - Montree Hanlue/Shutterstock.com.

Global climate change has already had observable effects on the environment. Glaciers have shrunk, ice on rivers and lakes is breaking up earlier, plant and animal ranges have shifted and trees are flowering sooner.

Effects that scientists had predicted in the past would result from global climate change are now occurring: loss of sea ice, accelerated sea level rise and longer, more intense heat waves.

Taken as a whole, the range of published evidence indicates that the net damage costs of climate change are likely to be significant and to increase over time.
- Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

Scientists have high confidence that global temperatures will continue to rise for decades to come, largely due to greenhouse gases produced by human activities. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which includes more than 1,300 scientists from the United States and other countries, forecasts a temperature rise of 2.5 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit over the next century.

According to the IPCC, the extent of climate change effects on individual regions will vary over time and with the ability of different societal and environmental systems to mitigate or adapt to change.

The IPCC predicts that increases in global mean temperature of less than 1.8 to 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit (1 to 3 degrees Celsius) above 1990 levels will produce beneficial impacts in some regions and harmful ones in others. Net annual costs will increase over time as global temperatures increase.

"Taken as a whole," the IPCC states, "the range of published evidence indicates that the net damage costs of climate change are likely to be significant and to increase over time."

Future effects

Some of the long-term effects of global climate change in the United States are as follows, according to the  

Change will continue through this century and beyond
  •  
    Global climate is projected to continue to change over this century and beyond. The magnitude of climate change beyond the next few decades depends primarily on the amount of heat-trapping gases emitted globally, and how sensitive the Earth’s climate is to those emissions.
 
Temperatures will continue to rise
  •  
    Because human-induced warming is superimposed on a naturally varying climate, the temperature rise has not been, and will not be, uniform or smooth across the country or over time.
Frost-free season (and growing season) will lengthen
  •  
    The length of the frost-free season (and the corresponding growing season) has been increasing nationally since the 1980s, with the largest increases occurring in the western United States, affecting ecosystems and agriculture. Across the United States, the growing season is projected to continue to lengthen.

    In a future in which heat-trapping gas emissions continue to grow, increases of a month or more in the lengths of the frost-free and growing seasons are projected across most of the U.S. by the end of the century, with slightly smaller increases in the northern Great Plains. The largest increases in the frost-free season (more than eight weeks) are projected for the western U.S., particularly in high elevation and coastal areas. The increases will be considerably smaller if heat-trapping gas emissions are reduced.  
 
Changes in precipitation patterns
  •  
    Average U.S. precipitation has increased since 1900, but some areas have had increases greater than the national average, and some areas have had decreases. More winter and spring precipitation is projected for the northern United States, and less for the Southwest, over this century.

    Projections of future climate over the U.S. suggest that the recent trend towards increased heavy precipitation events will continue. This trend is projected to occur even in regions where total precipitation is expected to decrease, such as the Southwest.
 
More droughts and heat waves
  •  
    Droughts in the Southwest and heat waves (periods of abnormally hot weather lasting days to weeks) everywhere are projected to become more intense, and cold waves less intense everywhere.

    Summer temperatures are projected to continue rising, and a reduction of soil moisture, which exacerbates heat waves, is projected for much of the western and central U.S. in summer. By the end of this century, what have been once-in-20-year extreme heat days (one-day events) are projected to occur every two or three years over most of the nation.  
 
Hurricanes will become stronger and more intense
  •  
    The intensity, frequency and duration of North Atlantic hurricanes, as well as the frequency of the strongest (Category 4 and 5) hurricanes, have all increased since the early 1980s. The relative contributions of human and natural causes to these increases are still uncertain. Hurricane-associated storm intensity and rainfall rates are projected to increase as the climate continues to warm.
 
Sea level will rise 1-4 feet by 2100
  •  
    Global sea level has risen by about 8 inches since reliable record keeping began in 1880. It is projected to rise another 1 to 4 feet by 2100. This is the result of added water from melting land ice and the expansion of seawater as it warms.

    In the next several decades, storm surges and high tides could combine with sea level rise and land subsidence to further increase flooding in many regions. Sea level rise will continue past 2100 because the oceans take a very long time to respond to warmer conditions at the Earth’s surface. Ocean waters will therefore continue to warm and sea level will continue to rise for many centuries at rates equal to or higher than those of the current century.  
 
Arctic likely to become ice-free
  •  
    The Arctic Ocean is expected to become essentially ice free in summer before mid-century.
U.S. regional effects

Below are some of the impacts that are currently visible throughout the U.S. and will continue to affect these regions, according to the Third National Climate Assessment Report, released by the

 

Northeast. Heat waves, heavy downpours and sea level rise pose growing challenges to many aspects of life in the Northeast. Infrastructure, agriculture, fisheries and ecosystems will be increasingly compromised. Many states and cities are beginning to incorporate climate change into their planning.

 

Northwest. Changes in the timing of streamflow reduce water supplies for competing demands. Sea level rise, erosion, inundation, risks to infrastructure and increasing ocean acidity pose major threats. Increasing wildfire, insect outbreaks and tree diseases are causing widespread tree die-off.

 

Southeast. Sea level rise poses widespread and continuing threats to the region’s economy and environment. Extreme heat will affect health, energy, agriculture and more. Decreased water availability will have economic and environmental impacts.

 

Midwest. Extreme heat, heavy downpours and flooding will affect infrastructure, health, agriculture, forestry, transportation, air and water quality, and more. Climate change will also exacerbate a range of risks to the Great Lakes.

Southwest. Increased heat, drought and insect outbreaks, all linked to climate change, have increased wildfires. Declining water supplies, reduced agricultural yields, health impacts in cities due to heat, and flooding and erosion in coastal areas are additional concerns.

 

https://climate.nasa.gov/effects/

 



#14
Bubble99

Bubble99

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 52 posts

Also, what the heck were people thinking in building over wetlands. Those protect you from flooding idiots. This country is just nuts. I'm planning on getting out of this nuthouse in 6 years. I have zero hope for people actually having intelligence here. And, I'm in a state that is extra special, we had half of our students fail the istep. Nice, really nice. Glad to see your education is working out for you.

 

Regardless of who blames what for what, the frustration for me is that people keep on building in spots that are extremely vulnerable to flooding etc. I mean, if the risk is high, why build there, unless you have the innovation of the Dutch, which many of these states do not have? Also, who cares if it's related to climate change, the fires are at least, and just because it's not due to climate change doesn't mean that we can sing a happy tune and go our merry way. We need to adapt to our changing world, both technologically and environmentally. I often feel like America has lost its mind, because just because climate change is a partisan issue, doesn't mean we can just make it go away. Sigh...and I'm the one that's crazy? You don't pretend there's no issue with something, you TALK about it. But, everyone is just blasting their brains with stupidity. Humanity....sometimes.

 

 

Also, what the heck were people thinking in building over wetlands. Those protect you from flooding idiots. This country is just nuts. I'm planning on getting out of this nuthouse in 6 years. I have zero hope for people actually having intelligence here. And, I'm in a state that is extra special, we had half of our students fail the istep. Nice, really nice. Glad to see your education is working out for you.

 

Tell that to people in the Philippines, Indonesia, India and Thailand



#15
Omosoap

Omosoap

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 158 posts

^ Why? I'm criticizing a country that has the monetary means to be a bit wiser with how they build or where they build. Some of those other countries either don't have the means or are way overcrowded already (or have more governmental corruption...) ...so I'd basically be telling them to kill themselves. Whereas the US does have the room and the means to do stuff differently, if they could get their heads in the right mindset. And, by a wealthier country or less crowded country doing this, it can have a positive effect on other countries. Besides, it's better for those who are leaders in the world, no matter who is doing what to be good examples. Unfortunately, the US has not been a good example as of late.



#16
Cartesian Logic

Cartesian Logic

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
While I agree that climate change most definitely has an impact on natural disasters, using them as a reason to boast the destructive nature of climate change is a huge understatement and misallocation of national attention. Most people only care when they see record high temperatures and record hight winds in hurricane season, and this is the wrong message to send to people. Climate change should be stressed year round, and the impact should be stressed to be at a much higher level than hotter summers and increased rainfall. It's not that you should not highlight climate change impact on such said natural disasters, only that this mentality makes the more significant hidden dangers seem benign. Climate change is the most significant existential crisis and should be treated as such. I'm not saying that you don' agree, only giving my reasons why I believe we should not highlight only the apparent impacts of climate change.

#17
Omosoap

Omosoap

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 158 posts

^ I'm not sure who you are addressing, but in regards to what I have said, I was focusing on natural disasters, but I don't just mean those. I'm concerned that humanity is trying to deny paradigm shifts and not adapting quickly enough. Coastal regions (especially low lying vulnerable ones) need to either become more innovative like the Dutch, shift their buildings to be more adapted to more water and higher water (as well as more sustainability of the populations in the area) etc, or shift the population altogether. Drier regions need to move if the temps get too high, but if the temps are still manageable, then manage with less water, and more sustainable uses of their resources, as well as clearing out plants that will no longer be able to adapt to that environment. Just cutting oil or coal isn't going to be near fast enough or effective enough, and also, innovation needs to happen, but there needs to be focused innovation, so that the problems that are most urgent get addressed first. It's great to innovate about something 30 years down the line, but that's not going to help someone in 5 years. The most immediate problems come first, such as adaptation. Also, geoengineering, well, I'm not sure that's going to happen right away, because it's unknown, so I think humanity will do that only when they are most desperate. If countries take care of their own problems in these environmental ways, especially adapting, they will not only avert heavier costs down the line, as well as suffering, but will then be able to help others adapt too. My main frustration with both sides, is they are so zeroed in on the zit on someone else's face, without actually legitimately taking action themselves. Also, if you are concerned about a problem, you need to stop just talking and actually do something about it. But, also, when conversing with people, don't attack them for having a different opinion, instead, question, and also, find small steps that can be taken in the area that actually inspire residents to care and to want to change, not the other way around. Most of all, massive change isn't going to happen, it's going to be small steps taken over a longer period of time. That is what I'm trying to do, take small steps over a longer period of time, but also think of innovative solutions to humanity's problems. I have a long way to go, but at least I recognize my own issues and the issues around me. I see many gaps in solutions to problems at the moment. Also, yes, I ranted and raved, but I just honestly was tired of hearing all about how wrong the other side was, without offering me, as a reader, any kind of solutions or ways to converse. It's either the conversation is completely shut down or entirely focused on things that are impossible for the average person to do. Start small, start easy to understand, and then we will get somewhere.



#18
MarcZ

MarcZ

    Chief Flying Car Critic

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,241 posts
  • LocationCanada

Reversed to what exactly? It's not as if there is some stable ideal climate the climate is always changing...



#19
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Nadsat Brat

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,155 posts
  • LocationAnur Margidda

Yes there is; we call it the 'Pre-Industrial Mean'. 

 

Particularly the period before the Little Ice Age; it was at that point that the climate was perfect for human civilizations to thrive. Just because the climate is always changing doesn't mean we should allow it to become hostile to human civilization. There was a perfect temperature point for us for a long stretch of time, and it would benefit us all if we could return to it. Utilize post-industrial technologies; begin scratching towards Type I status and bend the planet to our will.


  • Erowind likes this
Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#20
MarcZ

MarcZ

    Chief Flying Car Critic

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,241 posts
  • LocationCanada

Pre-Industrial mean seems like a silly idea to me considering only a few hundred years before there were a minor ice age. What is the timescale for this "mean", and how do we know this is our "ideal" temperature.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users