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Cool things being invented today!

technology

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6 replies to this topic

#1
JonahTron23

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:sungum:  :sungum:  :sungum: Hey it's me, the newest user. I'm gonna talk about cool things being invented today. You know the FT blog, but there is also forums! Leave cool ideas about new stuff being invented now! It can be anything you find, be creative! -JonahTron23

:bye:  :bye:  :bye:



#2
caltrek

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Welcome to the forum.

 

I will keep this thread in mind as I surf the internet.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#3
Jakob

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We have an entire board for this kind of material that you may want to check out: http://www.futuretim...current-events/


Click 'show' to see quotes from great luminaries.

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#4
JonahTron23

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We have an entire board for this kind of material that you may want to check out: http://www.futuretim...current-events/

Okay.



#5
JonahTron23

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Welcome to the forum.

 

I will keep this thread in mind as I surf the internet.

Thank you, caltrek! The future is awesome!  :biggrin:



#6
JonahTron23

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Just saying hi at 10:10 with cool font

 


#7
caltrek

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This could have easily been placed in the physics thread in the News and Discussion forum.  However, since we do have a thread dedicated to new inventions, its is also appropriate to place this story here.

 

World's Most Precise Clock Powered by Supercold Strontium Atoms

 

https://www.livescie...tium-atoms.html

 

Introduction:

 

A new kind of atomic clock is more precise than any yet built, with the ability to tick smoothly for a thousand times the lifetime of the universe. In addition to being the best timekeeper to date, the new so-called quantum gas clock might one day offer insights into new physics.

 

Researchers at JILA (formerly also referred to as the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics) used a combination of strontium atoms and an array of laser beams to create a clock so precise it might be able to measure the interaction of gravity at smaller scales than ever before. In doing so, it might shed light on the nature of its relationship to other fundamental forces, a mystery that has baffled physicists for decades.

 

Atomic clocks measure time by using the vibrations of atoms like a very precise metronome. Current atomic clocks are off by seconds over tens of billions of years. This newest iteration stays precise enough that it will be off by only 1 second over about 90 billion years. [5 of the Most Precise Clocks Ever Made]

 

To get that kind of precision, the team chilled strontium atoms to keep them from moving around and bumping into one another — something that can throw off their vibrations. First, they hit the atoms with lasers. When hit by the photons in the lasers, the atoms absorbed their energy and re-emitted a photon, losing kinetic energy and getting colder. But that didn't cool them enough. So to get them even colder, the team relied on evaporative cooling, allowing some of the strontium atoms to evaporate and accept yet more energy. They were left with between 10,000 and 100,000 atoms, at a temperature of only 10 to 60 billionths of a degree above absolute zero, or minus 459 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 273 degrees Celsius).

 

The cold atoms were trapped by a 3D arrangement of lasers. The beams were set up to interfere with each other. As they did so, they created regions of low and high potential energy, called potential wells. The wells act like stacked egg cartons, and each one holds a strontium atom.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






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