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Genocide & Atrocities Thread

Genocide Ethnic Cleansing Atrocities War Crimes Death Massacre

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#1
Pisiu369

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With all the things happening to the Rohingya minority in Myanmar, I have decided to make this thread.



#2
caltrek

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Speaking of the Rohingya minority in Myanmar:

 

http://Turkish Presi...thnic minority.

 

Introduction:

 

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has accused Myanmar of “genocide” against the Rohingya Muslim minority, who have fled in the tens of thousands across the border into Bangladesh to escape ethnic violence.

 

“There is a genocide there,” Erdoğan said in a speech in Istanbul during the Islamic Eid al-Adha feast, which commemorates Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his son.

 

“Those who close their eyes to this genocide perpetuated under the cover of democracy are its collaborators.”

 

Almost 400 people have died in violence in the north-western Rakhine state that Myanmar’s military said was triggered by attacks on security forces by insurgents from the Rohingya ethnic minority.

 

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#3
caltrek

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I don't have much to say on this topic that would be terribly original.  Just that genocide and atrocities against humans have been a sad fact of human history.  It is even more depressing to realize that such practices still happen in the 21st century.  One wonders if we will ever have a future in which humans being are still around in great numbers and where genocide and atrocities no longer occur.  One can hope for such a future.  One step in that direction is education, so I applaud the idea of starting this thread. 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#4
caltrek

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Chilling Photos of the Hundreds of Thousands of Rohingya Fleeing Burma

 

See link provided below to view referenced photos.

 

http://www.motherjon...tantine-photos/

 

Introduction:

 

In 2006, photojournalist Greg Constantine set out to Burma to document Rohingya Muslims being pushed out of their homes and fleeing to the Bangladesh border. He returned many times over the next 10 years, creating the book Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya in 2012. He was subsequently blacklisted and deported from Burma in 2016 for his reporting. 

 

With news of increasing atrocities against the Rohingya, Constantine returned to the border in mid-September, after the Burmese military launched a scorched-earth campaign against the Muslim minority that the United Nations has since described as “a textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” Over the past several weeks, about half a million people have fled their homes in Burma—the fastest exodus of refugees from a single country since before the Rwandan genocide. On Thursday, dozens of Rohingya refugees drowned off the coast of Bangladesh after their boat capsized in rough waters. Those traveling by foot also face the risk of landmines, which the Burmese military has been accused of planting in their path.

 

As tens of thousands of Rohingya cross into Bangladesh every day, refugee camps have swelled, with miles of makeshift shelters constructed of bamboo and plastic. Aid workers say most of the Rohingya there are pregnant women and mothers with babies and young children. Over the course of two weeks, Constantine photographed these sprawling border camps to document the harrowing stories of refugees who have lost everything and are now struggling to survive.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5
caltrek

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UN report details brutal Myanmar effort to drive out half a million Rohingya

 

https://www.theguard...T_US_collection

 

Introduction:

 

Myanmar security forces have driven out half a million Muslim Rohingya from northern Rakhine state, torching their homes, crops and villages to prevent them from returning, the UN human rights office said on Wednesday.

 

Jyoti Sanghera, head of the Asia and Pacific region of the UN human rights office, called on the Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi to “stop the violence” and voiced fear that if the stateless Rohingya refugees return from Bangladesh they may be interned.

 

“If villages have been completely destroyed and livelihood possibilities have been destroyed, what we fear is that they may be incarcerated or detained in camps,” she told a news briefing.

 

Friday, said UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric.

 

In a report based on 65 interviews with Rohingya who have arrived in Bangladesh in the past month, the UN human rights office said that “clearance operations” had begun before insurgent attacks on police posts on 25 August and included killings, torture and rape of children.

3500.jpg?w=300&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&f

 An eight-year-old Rohingya girl inside a refugee camp near Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. The report is based on 65 interviews with Rohingya who recently arrived in Bangladesh.

Photograph: Jorge Silva/Reuters


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#6
Sciencerocks

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Somalia: At least 230 dead in Mogadishu blast
Last edited Sun Oct 15, 2017, 06:02 PM - Edit history (1)
Source: BBC

 

A massive bomb attack in a busy area of the Somali capital Mogadishu on Saturday is now known to have killed at least 230 people, police say.

Hundreds more were wounded when a lorry packed with explosives detonated near the entrance of a hotel.

It is the deadliest terror attack in Somalia since the Islamist al-Shabab group launched its insurgency in 2007.

President Mohamed Abdullahi "Farmajo" Mohamed blamed the attack on them, calling it a "heinous act".

No group has yet said it was behind the bombing.

 

 

Read more: http://www.bbc.com/n...africa-41621660

http://www.telegraph...ver-in-somalia/


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#7
caltrek

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Suu Kyi visits Myanmar region torn by Rohingya conflict

 

https://www.msn.com/...ID=ansmsnnews11

 

Introduction:

 

(AP) YANGON, Myanmar — Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi visited the conflict-torn area of northern Rakhine state for the first time Thursday, as her government said a repatriation plan for the hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims who've fled violence there is underway.

 

Suu Kyi arrived in the state capital Sittwe and headed to restive northern Rakhine where many Rohingya villages were located. During a 2015 election campaign, she visited southern Rakhine, where there hasn't been much conflict.

 

"The state counselor just arrived but she is heading to Maungdaw, northern Rakhine, with the state officials," said Tin Maung Swe, a deputy director of the Rakhine government, using Suu Kyi's official title.

 

Suu Kyi spokesman Zaw Htay would not release Suu Kyi's plans for the trip until later because of security concerns.

 

 

More than 600,000 Rohingya from northern Rakhine have fled to Bangladesh since Aug. 25, when Myanmar security forces began what they called a "clearance operations" in response to deadly attacks on police outposts by insurgents. The U.N. has said the response has been disproportionate and amounts to ethnic cleansing.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#8
caltrek

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Tillerson Says US Considers Individual Sanctions for Myanmar

 

https://www.courthou...ctions-myanmar/

 

Introduction:

 

NAYPYITAW, Myanmar (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Wednesday that his country was deeply concerned by “credible reports” of atrocities committed by Myanmar’s security forces and called for an independent investigation into a humanitarian crisis that has seen hundreds of thousands of Muslim Rohingya flee to Bangladesh.

 

Speaking at a joint news conference with leader Aung San Suu Kyi in Myanmar’s capital, Tillerson said the U.S. would consider individual sanctions against people found responsible for the violence, but he would not advise “broad-based economic sanctions” against the entire country.

 

“All of that has to be evidence based,” Tillerson said. “If we have credible information that we believe to be very reliable that certain individuals were responsible for certain acts that we find unacceptable, then targeted sanctions on individuals very well may be appropriate,” he said.

 

Tillerson’s one-day visit comes as a new report said there was “mounting evidence” of genocide against the Rohingya in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine state, where a government security operation has caused more than 600,000 Rohingya to flee to neighboring Bangladesh.

 

Tillerson also met with Myanmar’s powerful military chief, Min Aung Hlaing, who is in charge of operations in Rakhine.

 

The article goes on to include some rather interesting observations about Aung San Suu Kyi 's attitude about all of this.  She seems to be putting some distance between her own policies and that of her military, which apparently operates with some autonomy from the civilian government that she heads.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#9
Yuli Ban

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I've been trying to look at Aung San Suu Kyi's view point on this, and what I found was that there's a long-standing fear and hatred of Islam in Buddhist countries due to the Islamic conquests. As was normal back in those days for universalizing religions, Islam supplanted Buddhism and supporters completely burned Buddhist culture to the ground in countries that failed to defend against it.  So quite frankly, they don't see this as some sort of racist ruling class oppressing a marginalized underclass (because they never do)— many hard-nationalist Buddhist citizens of Myanmar see this is as a war of extermination. If they don't kill the Muslims, the Muslims will kill them. In a manner, the current wave of ethnic cleansing was triggered by ISIS's rise and Mongol-esque successes back in 2014.

Imagine if a strain of Paganism took root in, say, Germany or Norway. It then began doing everything possible to burn churches and root out Christians everywhere (no, the Satanic black metal scene does not count). And why are they doing this? Because they say that their culture was under siege by Christianity for thousands of years, to the point that these original religions have absolutely nothing left in their own home countries. If they didn't fight back, the Christians would return into their land and wipe out their culture all over again.

In a manner, that's similar to the background over what's happening here. It's a form of reaction to centuries-old Islamic imperialism, stoked by the Burmese socialists and military junta way back in the day until it became all-out Islamophobia and Burmese ultranationalism.
 
What it should be suggesting to the world is that Buddhism is not the "true" religion of peace; it's just as capable of twisting its supporters' mind into acts of inhuman violence. This romanticisation is rooted in a fundamental misunderstanding of Asian culture and beliefs, trying to exalt their world in much the same way we try to exalt Native American religions as being some sort of ultra-peaceful, ultra-naturalistic way of Earthly life when it is still, at its core, an organized religion. In other words, we market Buddhism (usually only Zen Buddhism) as an all-natural escape from our Western troubles, something familiar enough to our Christian sensibilities but also "exotic" enough as to be, in a way, even more enlightened. But that's just not how it is. Buddhists have all of the same failings and idiots that Christians do. Adopting Buddhism doesn't mean you'll suddenly become One With The Earth, master your chi, and achieve nirvana; it's no different than becoming a Born Again Christian and believing you have experienced the Holy Spirit.  

 

Case in point:

 

Violence in Myanmar shows the world needs to stop romanticising Buddhism

THERE is a perception among the Western world that Buddhists are all peaceful people. But some are burning villages to the ground

PEOPLE don’t generally associate Buddhists with violence, especially not the type of violence that sees houses set on fire and gunfire sprayed around villages.
But one expert says people around the world need to shed their romanticised view of Buddhism and Buddhists as a peaceful religion and confront the reality of one of the worst human rights abuses in the world.
For three weeks now villages have been burning in Myanmar as military take revenge for an insurgent attack on police and paramilitary posts on August 25.
It’s the second outbreak of violence since October last year and nearly 400,000 Rohingya have fled Rakhine state.
People have been arriving at the Bangladeshi border town of Teknaf, crossing the Naf River in small boats. At least 88 people have drowned after their boats capsized while making the crossing.
As the tragedy unfolded on the beaches near Shah Porir Dwip fishing village, across the water, smoke could be seen billowing from burning villages in Myanmar.
Villages fleeing the violence tell of mobs of soldiers and Buddhist monks setting houses on fire and spraying the areas with automatic gunfire.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#10
caltrek

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PEOPLE don’t generally associate Buddhists with violence, especially not the type of violence that sees houses set on fire and gunfire sprayed around villages.

 

But one expert says people around the world need to shed their romanticised view of Buddhism and Buddhists as a peaceful religion and confront the reality of one of the worst human rights abuses in the world.

 

Yes and no.  Definitely, we should not come to conclusion that  Myanmar is incapable of genocide merely because it is "Buddhist".

 

Still the essence of Buddhism is pacifist in nature.  Just as the essence of the Sermon on the Mount is pacifist in nature, and the essence of Islam is pacifist in nature.  

 

It is one of the great ironies of history that Christians engaged in a bloody Crusade against Muslims in the name of being Christians. The problem comes when militaristic minded people gain control in countries that might otherwise be peaceful in their orientation.  Or when fanatical minorities decide to engage in terrorism to promote their otherwise pacifist religion. The true spirit of the religion in question becomes corrupted.  Over the long term, another result is that pacifist religions end up being widely perceived as something other than pacifist because of the actions of hypocrites and the ignorant within societies otherwise dominated by such religious tendencies. 

 

So, yes, in Myanmar, let us go where the facts lead us and not be unduly biased because Myanmar is predominantly Buddhist.  Still, let us also encourage Buddhists to embrace their own pacifist roots. 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#11
caltrek

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Editorial 

How much longer will the world sit by and watch crimes against humanity in Myanmar?

 

http://www.latimes.c...1129-story.html

 

Extract:

 

(Los Angeles Times) As the humanitarian crisis in Myanmar grows more grim, it shows every sign of taking its place on the shameful list of mass atrocities that the world did nothing to stop.

 

…According to accounts from numerous survivors, government forces and their supporters have raped, killed, set people on fire and pillaged villages, causing the mass exodus of more than 600,000 Rohingya — mainly to refugee camps in neighboring Bangladesh. That’s about half the Rohingya population of Myanmar. Evidence of Rohingya villages being burned has been there for all to see, via satellite image analysis provided by Human Rights Watch.

 

How much more savage do people have to be before the global community outside Myanmar is moved to act?

 

For decades, the Rohingya have lived as a stateless, disenfranchised, persecuted minority in Buddhist majority Myanmar (also known as Burma). Even as the country dramatically progressed from a military government to a fragile proto-democracy, nothing has improved for the Rohingya, who can trace their roots in Myanmar back for generations but have still been shunned as interlopers. About 120,000 live in squalid displacement camps in the Rakhine state. The latest violence ostensibly started as a government response to Rohingya militant attacks on military outposts in late August, but it has far surpassed an effort just to put down militants.

 

No entreaties over the years to Myanmar’s government, including its de facto civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi, appear to have made a difference. Like other leaders in Myanmar who don’t recognize the Rohingya as a separate ethnic group, Suu Kyi will neither utter the word “Rohingya” nor countenance people using it in her presence. She ordered a study of the troubles in Rakhine, where most Rohingya live, by a commission led by former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan. His report — which calls on the government to recognize the Rohingya’s rights — appears to have been ignored. Harsh criticism from human rights groups and her fellow Nobel Prize laureates has failed to move Suu Kyi, who remained resolute during a visit this week by Pope Francis. (Disappointingly, he also did not mention the Rohingya by name.) The leader of the military told the pope that there is no religious discrimination in Myanmar — as if brutality against a Muslim ethnic group didn’t count


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#12
Maximus

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Editorial 

How much longer will the world sit by and watch crimes against humanity in Myanmar?

 

...

 

How much more savage do people have to be before the global community outside Myanmar is moved to act?

 

...

 

I think this goes to show how despite decades of globalization, and the current popularity of the phrase "global citizen", the basic and most fundamental unit of human organization is still the state. When it comes down to it, it really is Hobbes' state of nature among states. This article speaks as if there actually is some unified "world" out there ready to deal justice out among states. The reality is, humanity is not united, and no state will assume the role of the world's policeman, unless it's acting in its own interests as well (i.e. the United States maintains freedom of the seas, which is beneficial to everyone, but especially beneficial to itself). What about multilateral organizations, such as NATO, or the UN Security Council? Surely those must mean something, right? Ha. Again, individual states' interests reign supreme here. NATO has no mandate - and to be frank, no interest- to invade Myanmar (can you imagine the backlash from China and India if all of the sudden NATO showed up there), and the UN Security Council (short of imposing some meaningless sanctions) is a complete and utter joke. 

 

So let's stop talking about what humanity ought to do, because humanity can't even agree on preventing psychotic totalitarian dictators from acquiring nuclear weaponry. Let's talk states, because those are the only entities currently capable of dealing with a crisis like this. If any states have the right and interest to invade Myanmar and depose its leadership, it must be Myanmar's neighbours. This crisis is causing destabilization, which is spilling over into states surrounding Myanmar. Hell, there are two rising superpowers, China and India, on its borders. Surely they could deal with this. But again, we see that the state considers its own interests above others. So will anything be done about this crisis? Nope. We can lament all we want, but that isn't helping matters at all. The only thing that can help is concrete action. 

 

It sounds cold, and inhumane to realize that we will stand by and watch a genocide happen, but that is the sad reality of our current form of social organization. Sovereignty of the state should become void once a state begins massacring its own citizens, but that doesn't quite cut it, because there is no mechanism for forcing other states to deal with another state's psychotic actions. So to answer the question, we will stand by until Myanmar causes enough destabilization to seriously piss of its neighbours- and even then, it's no sure thing they will invade Myanmar. Until then, the best the "world" can do is slap sanctions on Myanmar and condemn its leadership, a tactic which is laughable in the eyes of the powerful and determined, as Kim Jong-Un has shown us. 


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If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 

#13
caltrek

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Not to disagree with the excellent points put forward by Maximus, but I thought this story interesting.

 

Pope Francis utters the word 'Rohingya' after criticism

 

 

Introduction:

 

(Al Jazeera) Pope Francis has uttered the word "Rohingya" on a trip to Bangladesh, where hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees from Myanmar have sought safety.

 

Critics had decried his avoidance of speaking about the months-long persecution of the Rohingya during his four-day visit to Myanmar.

 

But as he met a multi-faith group in Dhaka on Friday, at St Mary's Cathedral, he told refugees: "The presence of God today is also called Rohingya."

 

Francis listened to the suffering and experiences of 16 refugees - 12 men, two women and two young girls - who approached him one by one.

 

"We have realised that your sufferings are very deep," he said, "We all want peace. We are working to establish peace where there are ill."

3c683bfc11f5482eb6eabc82d44f94c6_18.jpg

 

Francis shakes hands with a Rohingya refugee in Dhaka, Bangladesh

[Mohammad Ponir Hossain/Reuters]


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Genocide, Ethnic Cleansing, Atrocities, War Crimes, Death, Massacre

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