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Euthanasia News and Discussions

Euthanasia

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11 replies to this topic

#1
wjfox

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Nitschke's 'suicide machine' draws crowds at Amsterdam funeral fair

Sun 15 Apr 2018

Euthanasia advocate displays ‘Sarco’, a pod that fills with nitrogen, which he hopes will one day be available as a 3D-printable device

https://www.theguard...ia-funeral-fair


6iyHAo6.jpg



#2
tierbook

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huh.... Futurama was right


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#3
Casey

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Sounds great. Nice work, Nitschke. 



#4
Yuli Ban

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104-year-old Australian scientist 'welcomes death' at Swiss clinic

A 104-year-old Australian scientist who is set to end his life at a clinic in Switzerland later this week told CNN that his life was no longer worth living and said he hoped his story would lead to the legalization of assisted dying in other countries.
David Goodall, a respected botanist and ecologist, is due to die at the Life Circle clinic in Basel on Thursday, after traveling to Europe from his home town of Perth, Australia earlier this month.
The grandfather-of-12 and longtime member of pro-euthanasia group Exit International said his life stopped being enjoyable "five or 10 years ago," in part because of his failing mobility and eyesight.

"My life has been out in the field (working), but I can't go out in the field now," said Goodall, who must be pushed everywhere in a wheelchair, during an exclusive interview with CNN in his hotel in Basel on Tuesday.

 


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#5
wjfox

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Trump signs Right to Try Act for terminally ill patients

 

President Donald Trump has signed a bill giving terminally ill patients the right to try experimental treatments not approved by the government.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...canada-44305998

 

 

 


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#6
TranscendingGod

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Trump signs Right to Try Act for terminally ill patients

 

President Donald Trump has signed a bill giving terminally ill patients the right to try experimental treatments not approved by the government.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...canada-44305998

What? This news is pretty much antithetical to euthanasia. Euthanasia is predicated on the belief that the situation in which one is in cannot get better. This, in diametric opposition to euthanasia,  is predicated on the belief that some treatment can indeed ameliorate ones suffering.  


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#7
Alislaws

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Letting people do things that have a high chance of killing them (but are intended​ to cure them) when they are terminally ill means acknowledging that there comes a point that life is not really worth living, and that quality of life should be factored in when considering acceptable risks for patients.

 

This is a good step towards legalising euthanasia. 

 

Euthanasia, and suicide in general are prohibited by the Bible, so getting pro euthanasia laws in the United States will be very difficult. Ultimately this gives patients the option to try many increasingly risky treatments, which will eventually end their suffering one way or the other, and will teach doctors more about their condition, and potential treatments for it. Technically, they tried a risky treatment and failed, so no once committed suicide and everyone gets to go to heaven.

 

Its only a matter of time before someone starts a revolutionary experimental cancer cure that involves sitting in a pod full of nitrogen for half an hour. 



#8
wjfox

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Should we be able to choose our own death?

 

In this opinion piece, philosopher Nigel Warburton imagines a future world where we choose how we die.

 

https://www.bbc.com/...-death/p063hsy5

 



#9
TranscendingGod

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Letting people do things that have a high chance of killing them (but are intended​ to cure them) when they are terminally ill means acknowledging that there comes a point that life is not really worth living, and that quality of life should be factored in when considering acceptable risks for patients.

 

This is a good step towards legalising euthanasia. 

 

Euthanasia, and suicide in general are prohibited by the Bible, so getting pro euthanasia laws in the United States will be very difficult. Ultimately this gives patients the option to try many increasingly risky treatments, which will eventually end their suffering one way or the other, and will teach doctors more about their condition, and potential treatments for it. Technically, they tried a risky treatment and failed, so no once committed suicide and everyone gets to go to heaven.

 

Its only a matter of time before someone starts a revolutionary experimental cancer cure that involves sitting in a pod full of nitrogen for half an hour. 

So doing something that has a high risk of killing you means that you acknowledge that life is not really worth living? I'm sorry but i'm failing to see where the logic in this argument lies. 


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#10
Alislaws

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So doing something that has a high risk of killing you means that you acknowledge that life is not really worth living? I'm sorry but i'm failing to see where the logic in this argument lies. 

 

If your quality of life makes no difference, then it doesnt matter how ill you are, you can never try an unapproved treatment, because it might kill you. (or kill you more quickly)

The decision making process goes: "Is this an approved treatment yes or no?" at no point is the patient's condition factored in. 

 

If you allow high risk treatments for very ill patients you're decision making process is:

"How risky is this treatment?" "How sick is this patient?" "Is the patients level of sickness high enough to justify the risk of the treatment?"

 

So the patients quality of life (or technically their life expectancy) is being considered when making decisions about their health and treatment, which is a step forward from when this was not the case.

 

Also: 

 

Euthanasia is predicated on the belief that the situation in which one is in cannot get better. This, in diametric opposition to euthanasia,  is predicated on the belief that some treatment can indeed ameliorate ones suffering.

This isn't really true. Euthanasia is based on the idea that people have a right to choose what happens to them. It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with their situation being unable to improve. At the very least science advances every day, so it would be impossible to conclusively say that someone had no hope of any kind of improvement.



#11
wjfox

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Court backs agreed end-of-life decisions

 

Legal permission will no longer be required to end care for patients in a permanent vegetative state, the Supreme Court has ruled.

It will now be easier to withdraw food and liquid to allow such patients to die.

When families and doctors are in agreement, medical staff will be able to remove feeding tubes without applying to the Court of Protection.

Lady Black ruled there was no violation under the Human Rights Convention.

The Court of Protection has ruled on cases for 25 years but the process can take months or years, and it costs health authorities about £50,000 in legal fees to lodge an appeal.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45003947



#12
tomasth

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So cryonics and early brain scanning for upload , counts ?






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