Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

These ads will disappear if you register on the forum

Photo

3.5 billion year old fossils of bacteria found in Australia


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1
EVanimations

EVanimations

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,155 posts
  • LocationThe Eldritch Beyond

http://www.usnews.co...nd-in-australia

 

That's only a billion years after Earth's formation, and before the introduction of oxygen.

This will hopefully fan the fire on the quest for alien life!


I make an animated series about time travel and the future of humanity called ExoTemporal Excursion. You'll like it if you're into that sort of thing. I draw too I guess.

Also check out my futuristic robot resource pack for Minecraft, and Thrive, an under-development evolution simulator.


#2
Raklian

Raklian

    An Immortal In The Making

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,757 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC
http://www.usnews.co...nd-in-australia

 

That's only a billion years after Earth's formation, and before the introduction of oxygen.

This will hopefully fan the fire on the quest for alien life!

 

Scientists already knew water existed before oxygen in the atmosphere became the norm.

 

It was those microbes and certain organisms that contributed oxygen into the atmosphere while living under the water.

 

Yeah, this is something useful to think about. It tells us extraterristal worlds do not necessarily need oxygen in their atmospheres for life to thrive.


Edited by Raklian, 03 January 2013 - 03:15 PM.

  • eacao likes this
What are you without the sum of your parts?

#3
StanleyAlexander

StanleyAlexander

    Saturn, the Bringer of Old Age

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 909 posts
  • LocationBoston, Tomorrow

It also tells us that life took a very short time to appear.

 

Scientists have discovered older rocks, but Noffke says those rocks have eroded to the point where traces of life are all but impossible to find.

 

Maybe even less than a billion years, if they're right.

 

I can't wait till we've developed a more concrete definition of "life."  If we can pin down the point in history when the first self-replicating organic (or inorganic?) molecules showed up, it will help our perspective.


Humanity's destiny is infinity

#4
Raklian

Raklian

    An Immortal In The Making

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,757 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC
It also tells us that life took a very short time to appear.

 

Scientists have discovered older rocks, but Noffke says those rocks have eroded to the point where traces of life are all but impossible to find.

 

Maybe even less than a billion years, if they're right.

 

I can't wait till we've developed a more concrete definition of "life."  If we can pin down the point in history when the first self-replicating organic (or inorganic?) molecules showed up, it will help our perspective.

 

Maybe the definition of life will be fractal - meaning, at the largest scale, the Universe could be considered a living organism. It's the scale.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#5
StanleyAlexander

StanleyAlexander

    Saturn, the Bringer of Old Age

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 909 posts
  • LocationBoston, Tomorrow
It also tells us that life took a very short time to appear.

 

Scientists have discovered older rocks, but Noffke says those rocks have eroded to the point where traces of life are all but impossible to find.

 

Maybe even less than a billion years, if they're right.

 

I can't wait till we've developed a more concrete definition of "life."  If we can pin down the point in history when the first self-replicating organic (or inorganic?) molecules showed up, it will help our perspective.

 

Maybe the definition of life will be fractal - meaning, at the largest scale, the Universe could be considered a living organism. It's the scale.

I like that because then life isn't some cosmic fluke.


Humanity's destiny is infinity




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users