Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

These ads will disappear if you register on the forum

Photo

Stocks worth investing in in the near future?


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1
acapp0813

acapp0813

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • LocationU.S.

I think it's safe to say that all of us want to see the far future. But as a means of doing that, a good amount of money (and foresight) may be required for longevity/anti-aging treatments, augmentations, etc.. So what do you guys see as potential investment opportunities for the near future?

 

Companies like Tesla, for their innovative electric vehicles? Toyota, who is planning to reveal a self-driving car? Or perhaps medical companies like uniQure which I just read on here was developing forms of gene therapy?

 

Links:

Tesla: http://www.teslamotors.com/goelectric

Toyota: http://money.cnn.com....html?hpt=hp_t2

uniQure: http://www.futuretim...tm#gene-therapy

 

Let's know what your opinions are about this!



#2
SG-1

SG-1

    Carpe Vitam

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,564 posts
  • LocationUS - Arkansas

Hostess


  • StanleyAlexander likes this

Mark your calendars

Never Yield


#3
kjaggard

kjaggard

    Artificer

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,939 posts
  • Locationwhere fanciful imaginings and hard won knowledge meet to genesis the future.

I'm of mixed feelings about topics like this. The speculative markets are one of the things that have done some major damage to world economies, and I feel that in the next thrity years the way in which wealth influences the world will likely change substantially. I think the hoarding of financial resources to allow unequal advantages in a population will at the very least be much harder to do. Eventually it will get to the point where lots of money is no longer the status symbol it is now and it won't really open much more in the way of door.

 

But until then, odds are in the favor of money. So to get from here to there you have better odds with more money. Just keep in mind that it'll be carefully calculating things that is most important. Enough efforts to gain money to give you best return on your investments, but not so much that when the advantages are lost you are not stuck with years of wasted investment in something that no longer returns on the investment put into it. Much like buying a house used to be considered the wisest of investments, but now there are thousands or even millions that are paying down debts on houses that are worth less than they owe on them. and they have to work longer to pay off those debts.

 

as to the investments that make sense. keep in mind the other factor that plays into these things. Just because something is groundbreaking doesn't mean it will succeed. Gene therapy scares enough people and the rest don't understand it, I predict that's not likely to succeed heavily. As a gradual safe spot it may be a good choice to maintain value on investment so long as they don't take risks. One F up with media attention and this goes the way of a Japanese nuclear program.

 

So obnoxiously the best bets are things that are least able to be really risky. They are also not sudden wealth generators because success takes risk, or long slow steady progress. Risk makes fortunes but destroys more than it makes. Steady succeeds more but you can't reap the advantages for decades.

 

America is heavily invested in cars, fuels and electricity. Look for an old reliable or a daredevil in those areas. If you go the daredevil route your best bet is set a limit to how long you will remain invested with them, then bail out and switch to another. Even if the first makes more headway, because ultimately staying with risky people too long means to bare some of the consequences of that risk eventually.

 

Personally I'd take a smart risk taker until I had doubled my investment and pull out the original and put it in steady investments. Reevaluate the most recent actions of my risky and guage what the potential returns on other smart risky are up to. Go for the ones with the best medium term  return on investment (short term is too risky and often cuts corners, long term takes to damn long to get a return on investment and risks claiming the prize because somebody got there first) and shift if you need to. any investment that loses half it's value isn't worth sticking with. Never dip into your original investment once it's in stable and steady long terms. You can shift it around if your choices look to be in danger, but never move it back into risky markets. If you need new money to top off your risky funds after a few hits, earn it from working extra. repeat this process quarterly.

 

On top of that, only spend on needs. the rest invest. For the purposes of this discussion securing food supplies and water, and other self sufficiencies counts as investments and needs. In short minimise outgoing money, maximize incoming money and invest that in income generating assets.


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#4
Practical Mind

Practical Mind

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 323 posts
  • LocationAustralia

I guess most people on this forum don't like this side, but this is as essential for bringing the new technologies to life as research itself, and the startup model allows fast-tracking things, being largely responsible for the Cambrian explosion of technologies since 20 years or so. 

 

The trouble is, most  loudly trumpeted startups over the last 5 years are about new business models and distribution channels, and, sadly, "greater fool" investment (stupid cr@p like photosharing or daily deals). When, for example, a flashy app in Silicon Valley can get $40 million in funding, something that solves real-world problems and requires years to develop in a university will hardly get half a million. 

 

Unfortunately, even the large respected VCs are playing this game now - it is not the same as 1990s. This is why it is great that you are looking specifically for real innovation (which, admittedly, do not bring home much bacon, unless they are heavily promoted), and that the social bubble is finally bursting. 

 

How do you plan investing, acapp0813? If as an angel, it probably makes sense to become a part of an angel group, as due diligence requires both subject matter knowledge and rudimentary corporate governance skills. The general rule is, as these are "high risk / high growth" opportunities, under no circumstances put more than 5% (or 10%, if you're feeling generous and lucky) of your assets in it. 

 

The sad truth is, however, that the angels often get royally screwed. 

 

Your list has three companies. One is not a startup at all (Toyota), it is traded publicly in New York and London, and therefore everyone who wanted to buy its stock already did. Will it go up or down, who knows, that's a question for a gazillion market experts. One thing is sure, it is not a "high risk / high growth" opportunity, and it depends more on the market conditions than on innovations. If I were to guess I'd say it'll go up a bit if it releases a new really working self-driving car (and given that they brought the first mainstream hybrid car, I have trust in them). 

 

Tesla is located in Silicon Valley, heavily promoted, and while released their products, has not yet gone mainstream. I would say it's the least attractive investment target: it is already overhyped and likely overpriced as a company, but still may crash and burn. To make it even worse, the VCs already joined, which means you'll be in a company with tyrannosauruses.

 

I do not know much about UniQure. It appears to be an early-stage company. Normally, pharma companies take years to go into production mode due to long trial periods, therefore your investment will be speculative for many years to come. According to their website, they got an approval for one product. Great. Still, however, when I visit their website, I see several things which look a bit fishy. I know from personal experience that European startups are normally a lot more wasteful and overpriced than those in the US (Silicon Valley aside), but this one seems to be less prudent than average. 7 (!) directors in the board of directors (one guy is from Leuven - not cool). Audit Commitee. Remuneration Committee. WTF, is this a bank? "We are experiencing seriously increasing interest in gene therapies and related capabilities. Our business model is predicated on partnerships and licensing as a key source of funding. As a consequence we are actively pursuing various business opportunities – both out- and in-licensing." OK, maybe none of these directors ever handled marketing, but this sounds like someone is using words they don't understand - normally not the case with the Dutch. The company has been incorporated barely half a year ago. 

 

This is one of the high-risk / high-yield opportunities, but I would put a lot of effort into due diligence. 

 

In general, don't invest based on the prospective market, but more based on the people involved and the execution. 


Edited by Practical Mind, 06 January 2013 - 07:22 AM.


#5
acapp0813

acapp0813

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • LocationU.S.

Nice responses, thanks. I feel like Toyota is taking steps in the right direction, but as mentioned, they've been around awhile; their stock is at around $93 right now. I guess I'm looking along the lines for something new that could potentially boom. But obviously I'm sure everyone is. I suppose that's why I mentioned uniQure. All in all, I appreciate the advice from both of you.



#6
Practical Mind

Practical Mind

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 323 posts
  • LocationAustralia
Nice responses, thanks. I feel like Toyota is taking steps in the right direction, but as mentioned, they've been around awhile; their stock is at around $93 right now. I guess I'm looking along the lines for something new that could potentially boom. But obviously I'm sure everyone is. I suppose that's why I mentioned uniQure. All in all, I appreciate the advice from both of you.

 

Well, if you're really determined to try you had in investment, probably startups are not the best place to start (or if yes, maybe you can look at Kickstarter or something similar but be prepared to part with your money forever, just do it for educational purposes). 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users