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Skin Cells Brain Cells Antibiotics Future WHO

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#2541
Mike the average

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Thats shocking. In fact their stock price hasnt gone up over it either?

#2542
Matthew

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They're evil and unmoral...This is why government needs to protect the consumer and the disadvantaged of our society.


Liberterianism is a mental disease. A national health crisis and a threat to the future of this country...Worse than the threat from terrorism, asteroids, disease and yes global warming.

It is mindless anti-government idiocy. If it isn't turned back I predict the end of this country as a world power. Simply put the need to educate our entire population like any sane country is sen as wrong by the cult that practice this foolish idiocy. So is simple workers rights, child labor and every other sane policy of the modern world.


#2543
Jakob

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Company Raises the Price of a Drug That Fights Infant Epilepsy by 85,000%

 

 

Pharmaceutical companies are supposed to make medicines accessible for all. Granted, they have to make a profit, but that profit shouldn’t come at the expense of people’s lives, as was the case with Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals. This week, the company settled a lawsuit with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) for $100 million. Mallinckrodt supposedly engaged in illegal anti-competitive behavior to maintain its monopoly on an infant medication for epilepsy.

 
The drug in question is meant to treat infantile epilepsy, specifically a rare form of it called infantile spasms. Usually, this condition manifests before the first birthday of babies that have cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, or other such health problems. It affects only an estimated 2,000 to 2,500 children a year in the U.S. — quite a small market for a specialized drug.
 
Acthar Gel, a hormone injection used to treat infantile spasms, was acquired by Mallinckrodt when it bought Questor Pharmaceuticals in 2014. Before Questor bought the drug in 2001, it sold for $40 a vial. In 2012, under Questor, the price was raised to $28,000 a vial. After Mallinckrodt acquired the drug from Questor, the price went up even higher to $34,000 per vial. This inflated pricing generated more than $1 billion in revenue for Mallinckrodt in 2015.

 

Pharma is full of scumbags. We absolutely need to make sure that governments are invested in developing new drugs, if we want any hope of maintaining access to any lifesaving medicine. The title may be a bit misleading, as the original owner of the drug raise the price, but the point is that many pharmaceutical companies are willing to engage in this behaviour, and nobody is standing in their way.

 

https://futurism.com...lepsy-by-85000/

Meh, somebody else will just come up with a cure that costs $2. Like with the Shkreli thing.


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#2544
Mike the average

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I actually made money from Mallincrokdt, so i am glad i didnt miss out on a stock that took off after selling.

#2545
Yuli Ban

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Scientists want to use a genetically modified malaria parasite as a vaccine against the disease

"In the first human trial, 10 volunteers (including himself) each received about 200 mosquito bites, delivering a total of about 100,000–200,000 of the genetically modified parasites. No one became ill"

Despite the medical advances of the past century, malaria is still a global scourge. According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 429,000 people died of malaria worldwide in 2015, and there were over 200 million new cases.
Malaria’s continued toll is not for lack of prevention research: The most advanced vaccine, targeting a protein in the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium falciparum, will be piloted in Africa next year. But in a Phase 3 trial, the vaccine’s efficacy ranged from just 27 to 39 percent in infants and young children.
“I would say that the main reason why we don't have an effective malaria vaccine is the complexity of the parasitic organism that causes malaria,” says Stefan Kappe, director of Translational Science at the Center for Infectious Disease Research in Seattle.
He explains that the parasite is nearly as complex as a human cell, with over 5,000 proteins. After entering the human body from a mosquito vector, the parasite first infects the liver, then multiplies to infect other cells in the body, changing at each stage of infection.
“It's kind of a turncoat parasite,” he says. “And so it has been extremely difficult to devise strategies to come up with an effective vaccine to prevent infection or prevent illness.”
But Kappe is the principal investigator on a promising new test pitting the malaria parasite against itself — “fighting fire with fire,” as he explains. By knocking out three genes in Plasmodium falciparum, his team created a weakened version of the parasite that can’t replicate in the body to pass on malaria, but still stimulates a human immune response.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!

Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!


#2546
Maximus

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A Copy Of Your Organs On A Microchip? Here's Why It Could Save Your Life

 

You have to click the link to watch the video (advertising and all). Basically this can be used to make procedures such as chemotherapy safer, and potentially eliminate things like animal testing.

 

https://futurism.com...p/?src=featured


If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 
"China". -Donald J Trump

#2547
Maximus

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Scientists May Have Discovered What Allowed Life to Evolve

 

 

In 1924, Russian biochemist Alexander Oparin proposed the idea that the first living cells could have evolved from liquid droplet protocells. He believed these protocells could have acted as naturally forming, membrane-free containers that concentrated chemicals and fostered reactions.

 
In their hunt for the origin of life, a team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, both in Dresden, drew from Oparin’s theory by studying the physics of “chemically active” droplets (droplets that cycle molecules from the fluid in which they are surrounded). Unlike a “passive” type of droplet, like oil in water, which will just continue to grow as more oil is added to the mix, the researchers realized that chemically active droplets grow to a set size and then divide on their own accord.
 
This behavior mimics the division of living cells and could therefore be the link between the nonliving primordial liquid soup from which life sprung and the living cells that eventually evolved to create all life on Earth. “It makes it more plausible that there could have been spontaneous emergence of life from nonliving soup,” said Frank Jülicher, co-author of the study that appeared in the journal Nature Physics in December 2016. It’s an explanation of “how cells made daughters,” said lead researcher David Zwicker. “This is, of course, key if you want to think about evolution.

origin-of-division.jpg

Lucy Reading-Ikkanda/Quanta Magazine

 

https://futurism.com...life-to-evolve/


If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can't be done. -Peter Ustinov
 
"China". -Donald J Trump

#2548
caltrek

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Pesticide Additive Could Be One Culprit in Bee Deaths

 

https://www.scientif...-in-bee-deaths/

 

 

 

A common pesticide additive, known as an "inert" ingredient, could be one of the causes of the die-offs beekeepers have observed in their hives. Christopher Intagliata reports.

 

Springtime is flower season. And that includes some 90 million almond trees in California. It's the largest pollination event in the U.S.—and beekeepers truck in two thirds of the nation's captive honeybees to do the job. But for the last decade or so, the keepers have complained about failing colonies, with underdeveloped bees ejected from their hives. 

 

Now a study identifies one possible culprits. Not a pesticide, but one of the many ingredients used alongside them. "So these are added into a formulation to enhance the efficacy of the active ingredients." Julia Fine, an entomologist at Penn State. "It's just called "other ingredients" and they often are the bulk of the formulated product."

 

 The chemical in question is known as an organosilicone surfactant. Fine and her colleagues fed the chemical to honeybee larvae over time, and exposed them to a cocktail of common beehive viruses. And they found that larvae exposed to the chemical and the viruses together appeared to die in greater numbers than did bees exposed to the viruses or the chemical alone—a possible synergistic effect. And the symptoms they saw mirrored the ones beekeepers observed in their hives. The study is in the journal Scientific Reports. [Julia D. Fine et al., An Inert Pesticide Adjuvant Synergizes Viral Pathogenicity and Mortality in Honey Bee Larvae]

 

Fine and her team still have to determine how much of these chemicals actually make it into the bees' food. But they do know hundreds of thousands of pounds of them are used in almond orchards each year. And elsewhere. "Agriculture is just one use for organosilicone surfactants. It's all over the place. So if we can find it has any effect in an organism, it will be relevant."

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






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