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Skin Cells Brain Cells Antibiotics WHO biotechnology genetic engineering bioprinting cancer evolution transhumanism

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#3281
Sciencerocks

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Biomarker may predict early Alzheimer's disease
November 10, 2017

 

Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified a peptide that could lead to the early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The discovery, published in Nature Communications, may also provide a means of homing drugs to diseased areas of the brain to treat AD, Parkinson's disease, as well as glioblastoma, brain injuries and stroke.

"Our goal was to find a new biomarker for AD," says Aman Mann, Ph.D., research assistant professor at SBP who shares the lead authorship of the study with Pablo Scodeller, Ph.D., a postdoctoral researcher at SBP. "We have identified a peptide (DAG) that recognizes a protein that is elevated in the brain blood vessels of AD mice and human patients. The DAG target, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) appears in the AD brain before amyloid plaques, the pathological hallmark of AD."

 

https://medicalxpres...er-disease.html


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#3282
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Trump ends program that pairs service dogs with veterans at Fort Belvoir and Walter Reed.
 

This is sad :(

I don't mean to defend Trump, but maybe don't say that he ended the program, when the article says that the whole thing is a big mystery, and never even mentions anyone Trump related.


Pope Francis said that atheists are still eligible to go to heaven, to return the favor, atheists said that popes are still eligible to go into a void of nothingness.


#3283
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Cancer immunotherapy uses melanin against melanoma
November 10, 2017

 

Researchers have developed a melanin-enhanced cancer immunotherapy technique that can also serve as a vaccine, based on early experiments done in a mouse model. The technique is applied via a transdermal patch.

"Melanin is a natural pigment that can efficiently transform absorbed sunlight energy into heat," says Zhen Gu, corresponding author of a paper on the work and an associate professor in the joint biomedical engineering program at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "We demonstrated that melanin, which is found at high levels in melanoma, can actually be used to help treat melanoma. We do this by shining near infrared (IR) light on a therapeutic skin patch, which promotes the systemic immune response that fights cancer."

 

https://medicalxpres...n-melanoma.html


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#3284
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16 Health Problems That Improved in Patients Who Switched From Gentically Modified Organisms to Organic Diets
 

https://www.alternet...o-organic-diets

 

Introduction:

 

(Alternet) A peer-reviewed article released Tuesday in the International Journal of Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine and conducted by the Institute for Responsible Technology revealed that the health of all of the participants improved after switching to a non-GMO diet or simply reducing the amount of GMO foods they ate. 

 

The results, from over 3,250 people, mostly in the United States, closely matched reports by physicians around the nation who have seen similar results when their patients change to largely non-GMO and organic diets. 

 

Participants reported improvements in 28 conditions; digestive problems was the most often cited at 85.2 percent. The vast majority said their conditions were significantly improved, nearly gone or completely recovered.

 

 

https://responsiblet...ffrey-Smith.pdf

 

Extract:

 

(International Journal of  Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine) The conditions that were most frequently reported as showing improvement include: Digestive: 85.2%, Fatigue, low energy: 60.4%, Overweight or obesity: 54.6%, Clouding of consciousness, “brain fog”: 51.7%, Food allergies or sensitivities: 50.2%, Mood problems, such as anxiety or depression: 51.1%, Memory, concentration: 48.1%, Joint pain: 47.5%, Seasonal allergies: 46.6%, Gluten sensitivities: 42.2%, Insomnia: 33.2%, Other skin conditions (not eczema): 30.9%, Hormonal problems: 30.4%, Musculoskeletal pain: 25.2%, Autoimmune disease: 21.4%, Eczema: 20.8%, and Cardiovascular problems, including high blood pressure: 19.8%.

 

shutterstock_211563448.jpg?itok=sQ8XOAzsPhoto Credit: igor.stevanovic

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#3285
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We Know Terrifyingly Little About How Our Bodies Respond to Pollutants, but That's Changing

https://www.alternet...-thats-changing

 

 

Introduction:

 

(Alternet) Bad news: unless you live in a bubble, you are full of contaminants. Somewhat more reassuring news: every other living creature on Earth seems to share this condition with you.

 

Both terrifying and unifying, widespread contamination in humans and wildlife arises due to the slow and constant accumulation of chemicals in living creatures from their surrounding environment and diet, in a pathway known as bioaccumulation. Virtually everything you or any other living creature do contributes to this buildup: consumer products, food, textiles, building materials, household dust, drinking water, surface water, deep water, soil, and even air have all been found to contain multitudes of human-created chemicals.

 

recent study has even found microplastic fibers in municipal drinking water supplies across the country and globe.

 

Despite our chemical-laden lifestyles, we have almost no comprehensive idea how the accumulation of these compounds impacts living creatures, particularly wildlife, beyond acute effects. Yes, some chemicals have been shown to cause cancer or seriously mess up hormone production in humans or wildlife. But most chemicals in the environment primarily act by changing or weakening organisms’ overall health in ways that don’t outright kill them.

 

This poor understanding stems from the fact that it is difficult to pin down definitive or causal relationships between pollution and its consequences when so many other factors could be at play in complex living systems. When a human gets cancer or a bird is having trouble laying eggs, it is nearly impossible to parse out how contaminants contributed in conjunction with variables like age, genetic inclination, nutritional state, and other environmental stressors.

 

Yet the challenging nature of the problem hasn’t dissuaded researchers from broaching it, and we are slowly starting to better understand how contaminants impact living beings. One recent study, in particular, helps highlight just how far we’ve come in understanding the sub-lethal metabolic effects contaminants have on wildlife.

 

 

shutterstock_385975117.jpg?itok=85-0GSBZ

Photo Credit: leungchopan/Shutterstock


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#3286
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Proteome of the human heart mapped for the first time
November 15, 2017

 

A healthy heart beats about two billion times during a lifetime, thanks to the interplay of more than 10,000 proteins. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) and the German Heart Centre at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now determined which and how many individual proteins are present in each type of cell in the heart. They have now compiled the first atlas of the healthy human heart, known as the cardiac proteome. The atlas will make it easier to identify differences between healthy and diseased hearts in future.

Proteins are the molecular machines of cells, and they perform a range of functions. They are produced by the cells based on blueprints stored in their DNA. Changes occurring at the DNA or protein level can lead to disorders. For such changes to be recognized as underlying causes of heart disease, it is important to know precisely which proteins are present in the healthy heart and in what quantities.

 

https://medicalxpres...uman-heart.html


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#3287
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US scientists try first gene editing in the body
November 15, 2017 by Marilynn Marchione

 

Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person's DNA to try to cure a disease.

The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spot.

"It's kind of humbling" to be the first to test this, said Madeux, who has a metabolic disease called Hunter syndrome. "I'm willing to take that risk. Hopefully it will help me and other people."

Signs of whether it's working may come in a month; tests will show for sure in three months.

If it's successful, it could give a major boost to the fledgling field of gene therapy . Scientists have edited people's genes before, altering cells in the lab that are then returned to patients. There also are gene therapies that don't involve editing DNA.

 

https://medicalxpres...-gene-body.html


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#3288
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Scientists reverse diabetes in a mouse model using modified blood stem cells
November 15, 2017

 

Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have successfully reversed type 1 diabetes in a mouse model by infusing blood stem cells pre-treated to produce more of a protein called PD-L1, which is deficient in mice (and people) with type 1 diabetes. The cells curbed the autoimmune reaction in cells from both mice and humans and reversed hyperglycemia in diabetic mice.

Findings were published today in Science Translational Medicine. "There's really a reshaping of the immune system when you inject these cells," says Paolo Fiorina, MD, PhD, of Boston Children's, senior investigator on the study.

The study shows that the treated stem cells, given to mice, home to the pancreas where islet cells are made. Almost all the mice were cured of diabetes in the short term, and one third maintained normal blood sugar levels for the duration of their lives. The treatment was effective whether PD-L1 production was stimulated through gene therapy or pre-treatment with small molecules.

 

https://medicalxpres...ouse-blood.html


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#3289
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New painkillers reduce overdose risk
November 16, 2017

https://medicalxpres...s-overdose.html

Left to right: This is the study first author Cullen Schmid, staff scientist, and TSRI Professor Laura Bohn. Credit: Laura Bohn, The Scripps Research Institute

Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed new opioid pain relievers that reduce pain on par with morphine but do not slow or stop breathing—the cause of opiate overdose.

The research, published today in the journal Cell, describes a method for making safer opioid painkillers. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 91 Americans die every day from opioid overdoses—deaths caused when opiates like oxycontin, heroin and fentanyl slow and eventually stop a person's breathing.

Study leader TSRI Professor Laura M. Bohn, Ph.D., said the research shows that a range of compounds can deliver pain-blocking potency without affecting respiration.

The study builds on two decades of research by Bohn and her colleagues, who long questioned whether the painkilling pathway, called the G protein pathway, could be unlinked from the breathing suppression pathway, called the beta-arrestin pathway.

 


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#3290
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Doctor makes shocking claim, first steps toward world's first 'head transplant'
By Jenn Gidman | Newser

 

The first step in what USA Today says would be an "audacious" therapy reportedly took place in China Friday: the world's first human head transplant, achieved with two corpses.

And Sergio Canavero, the Italian doctor behind the alleged procedure, says he plans to do the same thing next on two brain-dead patients, followed by an "imminent" surgery with a living one, the Telegraph reports.

Per Newsweek, Canavero described the procedure Friday at a Vienna press conference, explaining that his team had taken the head off one body and placed it on another, fusing the spine, blood vessels and nerves.

 

http://www.foxnews.c...mpid=NL_SciTech


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#3291
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https://www.newscien...e-cant-stop-it/

Biohackers are using CRISPR on their DNA and we can’t stop it







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Skin Cells, Brain Cells, Antibiotics, WHO, biotechnology, genetic engineering, bioprinting, cancer, evolution, transhumanism

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