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#3361
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Economist Larry Summers: 10,000 people will die annually from GOP tax bill
Source: The Hill

 


Economist Larry Summers said Monday that roughly 10,000 more Americans will die each year if Republican tax-reform legislation passes and includes a repeal of the ObamaCare individual mandate.

"I think this bill is very dangerous," Summers said on CNBC's "Squawk Box."

"When people lose health insurance, they're less likely to get preventive care, they're more likely to defer health care they need, and ultimately they're more likely to die." The Senate passed its tax-reform legislation early Saturday morning. The upper chamber's bill includes a repeal of the individual mandate, while the House's tax-reform bill does not.

Summers's estimate is based on a Congressional Budget Office report that 13 million Americans would opt out of ObamaCare if the individual mandate is repealed.

 

 

Read more: http://thehill.com/p...om-gop-tax-bill

 

This is pure evil. God I hate the republican party.


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#3362
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^ I mean, most people who are going to die will be Republicans (elderly whites being the ones most likely to defer medical care if they don't believe they can afford it), so... depends on your empathy there how to take that.


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#3363
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NEST360's low-cost jaundice detector passes first test in Africa
December 4, 2017

The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts preparing for a Dec. 11 competition for $100 million from the MacArthur Foundation. The money would allow the team to carry out its visionary plan to halve the number of newborn deaths in African hospitals within 10 years.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...africa.html#jCp


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#3364
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Researchers use nanoparticles to target, kill endometrial cancer
December 4, 2017

 

Tumor-targeting nanoparticles loaded with a drug that makes cancer cells more vulnerable to chemotherapy's toxicity could be used to treat an aggressive and often deadly form of endometrial cancer, according to new research by the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...cancer.html#jCp


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#3365
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New tuberculosis drugs possible with understanding of old antibiotic
December 5, 2017

D-cylcoserine phosphate in complex with ADP and magnesium bound at the active site of E. coli D-ala-D-alanine ligase. Credit: University of Warwick

Tuberculosis, and other life-threatening microbial diseases, could be more effectively tackled with future drugs, thanks to new research into an old antibiotic by the University of Warwick and The Francis Crick Institute.

Led by Professor David Roper at Warwick's School of Life Sciences and Dr Luiz Pedro Carvalho from The Francis Crick Institute, a paper published today in Nature Communications reveals a deeper understanding of how the antibiotic D-cycloserine uniquely works at a molecular level.

This could lead to more effective future antibiotics - which are desperately needed to fight increasingly drug-resistant and deadly bacteria.

 

https://medicalxpres...antibiotic.html


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#3366
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New technique enables harvesting of stem cells during a caesarian
Medical
Michael Irving

 

Stem cells have incredible potential for regenerative medicine, but getting hold of them in large enough numbers can be tricky. Amniotic fluid may be a plentiful source, and now scientists from Lund University in Sweden have developed a method and device that can collect the fluid during delivery of a baby by caesarean section, to safely harvest large amounts of stem cells.

With the ability to replicate into other cells in the body, stem cells are valuable as a potential starting point for treating a wide range of illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and Alzheimer's, and potentially restoring impaired hearing or vision. The problem is that current methods of extracting them are either invasive and painful – as is the case from bone marrow – ethically controversial when sourced from human embryos, or don't have a very high yield, such as from umbilical cord blood.

 

https://newatlas.com...em-cells/52477/


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#3367
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Lab-engineered ovaries superior to hormone drugs in animal model
December 5, 2017

 

New research in rats suggests the possibility of bioengineering artificial ovaries in the lab to provide a safer, more natural hormone replacement therapy for women. A team from Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine found that the engineered ovaries were more effective than hormone therapy drugs at improving bone and uterine health and body composition.

"The treatment is designed to secrete hormones in a natural way based on the body's needs, rather than the patient taking a specific dose of drugs each day," said Emmanuel C. Opara, Ph.D., senior author and professor of regenerative medicine at the institute, which is part of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

 

https://medicalxpres...mone-drugs.html


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#3368
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Cryo-EM reveals 'crown-like' structure of protein responsible for regulating blood flow
December 6, 2017

 

A team led by scientists at Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) has revealed for the first time the atomic-level structure of a promising drug target for conditions such as stroke and traumatic brain injury.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...nsible.html#jCp


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#3369
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Existing cancer medication offers potential to treat Huntington's disease
December 6, 2017

A drug already used to treat certain forms of cancer may also be an effective therapy for Huntington's disease, according to a new study in the latest issue of Science Translational Medicine. The same study also increases our understanding of how this drug, and other medications like it, may offer hope for other neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease.

 

https://medicalxpres...on-disease.html


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#3370
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Hijacking gut-brain communications can shut down hunger pangs
 

 

A new study from the University of Pennsylvania has uncovered the biological mechanism by which our gut communicates with the brain to regulate the sensation of hunger. The researchers also discovered a novel combination of hormones that can mimic the signal sent to our brain telling it that enough food has been consumed.

 

https://newatlas.com...scovered/52509/


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#3371
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Canola oil linked to worsened memory and learning ability in Alzheimer's
December 7, 2017
 

 

Canola oil is one of the most widely consumed vegetable oils in the world, yet surprisingly little is known about its effects on health. Now, a new study published online December 7 in the journal Scientific Reports by researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) associates the consumption of canola oil in the diet with worsened memory, worsened learning ability and weight gain in mice which model Alzheimer's disease. The study is the first to suggest that canola oil is more harmful than healthful for the brain.

"Canola oil is appealing because it is less expensive than other vegetable oils, and it is advertised as being healthy," explained Domenico Praticò, MD, Professor in the Departments of Pharmacology and Microbiology and Director of the Alzheimer's Center at LKSOM, as well as senior investigator on the study. "Very few studies, however, have examined that claim, especially in terms of the brain."

 


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#3372
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Mutations in neurons accumulate as we age: The process may explain normal cognitive decline and neurodegeneration
December 7, 2017

This graph of all 161 neurons in the dataset, sampled at different ages, shows the quantity and type of mutations they carry. From left to right, by ascending age in each group, are neurons from normal controls, people with Cockayne …more

Scientists have wondered whether somatic (non-inherited) mutations play a role in aging and brain degeneration, but until recently there was no good technology to test this idea. A study published online today in Science, led by researchers from Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, used whole-genome sequencing of individual neurons and found strong evidence that brain mutations accumulate as we age. They also found that mutations accumulate at a higher rate in people with genetic premature aging disorders causing early brain degeneration.

"It's been an age-old question as to whether DNA mutations can accumulate in neurons—which usually don't divide—and whether they are responsible for the loss of function that the brain undergoes as we get older," says Christopher A. Walsh, MD, PhD, chief of the Division of Genetics and Genomics at Boston Children's and co-senior author on the paper. "It hasn't been possible to answer this question before, because we couldn't sequence the genome of a single cell, and each mutation accumulated is unique to each cell."

 

https://medicalxpres...-cognitive.html


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#3373
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New compound stops progressive kidney disease in its tracks
December 7, 2017
 

Progressive kidney diseases, whether caused by obesity, hypertension, diabetes, or rare genetic mutations, often have the same outcome: The cells responsible for filtering the blood are destroyed. Reporting today in Science, a team led by researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School describes a new approach to prevent death in these essential kidney cells. Studying multiple animal models of kidney disease, the team discovered a compound that can impede loss of the filtration cells and restore kidney function. The work, inspired by an investigation into a genetic form of the condition, has the potential to affect therapeutic research for millions of people suffering from progressive kidney diseases.

"We're ultimately trying to create a drug that can protect these critical filtration cells in the kidney," said senior author Anna Greka, an institute member at Broad, associate physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. "We attacked the problem from the biology of the genetic disease, and we think we've actually found what might be a shared pathway for kidney failure—and a potential way to treat it."

 

https://medicalxpres...ase-tracks.html


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#3374
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Scientists modify CRISPR to epigenetically treat diabetes, kidney disease, muscular dystrophy
December 7, 2017

 

Salk scientists have created a new version of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology that allows them to activate genes without creating breaks in the DNA, potentially circumventing a major hurdle to using gene editing technologies to treat human diseases.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...kidney.html#jCp


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#3375
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Researchers find genes may 'snowball' obesity
December 7, 2017

 

There are nine genes that make you gain more weight if you already have a high body mass index, McMaster University researchers have found.

"It's similar to a tiny snow ball at a top of a hill that becomes bigger and bigger when rolling down the hill," said senior author David Meyre, an associate professor of health research methods, evidence and impact at McMaster University. He also holds the Canada Research Chair in Genetics of Obesity.

"The effect of these genes may be amplified by four times, if we compare the 10% of the population at the low end of the body mass index, compared to the 10% at the high end," he added.

 

https://medicalxpres...ll-obesity.html


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#3376
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Gene variants identified that may influence sexual orientation in men and boys
December 8, 2017 by Bob Yirka report

 

(Medical Xpress)—A large team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. and one each from Australia and the U.K. has found two gene variants that appear to be more prevalent in gay men than straight men, adding further evidence of sexual orientation having a biological component. In their paper published in Scientific Reports, the group describes their study, which consisted of comparing the genomes of multiple gay men against multiple straight men.

 

https://medicalxpres...l-men-boys.html


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#3377
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Gene variants identified that may influence sexual orientation in men and boys
December 8, 2017 by Bob Yirka report

 

(Medical Xpress)—A large team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. and one each from Australia and the U.K. has found two gene variants that appear to be more prevalent in gay men than straight men, adding further evidence of sexual orientation having a biological component. In their paper published in Scientific Reports, the group describes their study, which consisted of comparing the genomes of multiple gay men against multiple straight men.

 

https://medicalxpres...l-men-boys.html

So what happens here when parents get control over this?


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#3378
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Advancing beyond gauze and pirate eye patches to protect injured eyes

 

USC scientists and engineers develop an on-the-spot, temperature-sensitive gel that could seal eye injuries on the battlefield. The gel has only been tested on rabbits. Human clinical trials could begin in 2019.

When traumatic eye injury on the battlefield or in civilian life, any delay in treatment may lead to permanent vision loss. With medical facilities potentially far away and no existing tools to prevent deterioration, medics are in a high-stakes race against the clock.

The gel seals eye injuries. When the patient is ready for surgery to repair the injury, the seal can be removed by adding cool water, the researchers said.

I keep loling at how fast this is going out of date.

 

2147 – a medical miracle is invented in the form of Nano-Gel. ...


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#3379
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Gene variants identified that may influence sexual orientation in men and boys
December 8, 2017 by Bob Yirka report

 

(Medical Xpress)—A large team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. and one each from Australia and the U.K. has found two gene variants that appear to be more prevalent in gay men than straight men, adding further evidence of sexual orientation having a biological component. In their paper published in Scientific Reports, the group describes their study, which consisted of comparing the genomes of multiple gay men against multiple straight men.

 

https://medicalxpres...l-men-boys.html

So what happens here when parents get control over this?

 

 

 

I'd hope they would accept it as it is genetic.


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#3380
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Localized Inflammation In The Brain Linked To Overeating, Obesity

 

http://www.naturewor...ing-obesity.htm

 

Introduction:

 

(Nature World News) A new study led by researchers from the University of California-San Francisco and University of Washington Medical Center revealed that a local inflammation in the region of the brain known as mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) could trigger overeating and weight gain.

 

The study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, showed that eating a fat-rich diet could cause the brain-resident immune cells called microglia to expand in number. The increase in microglia then triggers a local inflammation within the MBH. As a result, an individual may tend to eat more food, burn fewer calories and gain more weight.

 

For the study, the researchers conducted series of an experiment on animal models. For four weeks, a group of mice was fed with a fast food-like diet rich in fat. It has been known that eating fat-rich diet could increase the number of microglia in the MBH, triggering a local inflammation. Compared to the group of mice under a healthier low-fat diet, the mice fed with fat-rich diet consume more food and burn fewer calories, which resulted in a substantial weight gain.

 

To determine if the increased number of microglia is responsible for overeating and obesity, the researchers gave the mice on a fatty diet an experimental drug called PLX5622. The drug depleted the number of microglia in the MBH of the mice. Interestingly, these mice ate 15 percent less and gained 20 percent less weight than untreated mice on the same diet. In another experiment, the researchers' genetically engineered mice to prevent microglia from activating inflammatory responses. These genetically engineered mice were also put on a high-fat diet. The researchers observed that these mice ate 15 percent less and gained 40 percent less weight.

 

"From these experiments we can confidently say that the inflammatory activation of microglia is not only necessary for high-fat diets to induce obesity, but also sufficient on its own to drive the hypothalamus to alter its regulation of energy balance, leading to excess weight gain," said Joshua Thaler, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine at the UW Medicine Diabetes Institute and senior co-author of the study in a press release.

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Skin Cells, Brain Cells, Antibiotics, WHO, biotechnology, genetic engineering, bioprinting, cancer, evolution, transhumanism

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