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#3361
caltrek

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A Reporter Goes to Ground Zero for Today’s American HIV Epidemic

 

https://www.propubli...an-hiv-epidemic

 

Introduction:

 

(Pro Publica) A few years ago, freelance journalist Linda Villarosa thought she was done covering HIV. She had accomplished plenty — front page stories for The New York Times, articles in Essence magazine. She started in the 1980s when there was little hope for those who had contracted the disease, but now, with the advent of antiretroviral drugs and the steady decline of AIDS deaths in the United States, the story started to feel, somehow, less urgent.

 

Then, she came across two studies. One from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that if current trends continued, one out of every two black gay men in America would have HIV. Another said Jackson, Mississippi, was essentially ground zero for the disease.

 

She realized she most certainly was not done writing about HIV.

 

On today’s episode of The Breakthrough, Villarosa describes how these studies inspired her to travel to Jackson. There, she witnessed how a disease nearly forgotten in parts of the country continues to aggressively spread among gay black men who lack access to the drugs and services that have saved lives elsewhere.

 

She met Cedric Sturdevant, the project coordinator for a small social services agency called My Brother’s Keeper, who delivers food and medication throughout the Mississippi Delta out of a beat-up Ford Expedition. He serves as a father figure, nurse and motivational coach to dozens of young, HIV-positive men. She met a 21-year-old man who had been taking the preventive drug known as PrEP, but slipped, became infected, and in five months, “looked like AIDS in Africa,” as Villarosa put it.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#3362
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First U.S. Baby Born After Uterus Transplant
Source: The Daily Beast

 

 


A woman born without a uterus has given birth to a baby for the first time within the United States, Time reported Friday. The woman, who asked not to be identified for privacy, gave birth Friday at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, which has been one of the few in America to launch and perfect the process of uterus transplants. The very first uterus transplant, in Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg in Sweden, led to eight subsequent births. This birth is the first after the Swedish case to be successful. Dr. Liza Johannesson, a uterus transplant expert on the team, said it paved the path for future solutions for women born without uteruses to viably have children. “We were very proud of the first birth in Sweden,” she said in a statement. “But this birth is what’s going to make the field grow, because this is the first time this has been replicated anywhere else. This step is equally, if not even more, important.”

READ IT AT TIME

 

###

Read more: https://www.thedaily...erus-transplant



#3363
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Trump failing to lead on HIV, advocates say on World AIDS Day

Source: nbc



by Dartunorro Clark / Dec.01.2017 / 2:28 PM ET


..............................
 

Critics have expressed concern that Trump's executive actions on health care (and his support for failed GOP measures to replace the law) are indicative of his administration's indifference to combating HIV/AIDS, especially in comparison to his predecessors. Others, however, say they're withholding judgment as federal agencies like the Department of Health and Human Services, the National Institutes of Health and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continue critical work.

Scott Schoettes, HIV Project Director at Lambda Legal and one of six members who resigned in protest from the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS in June, said Trump has consistently failed to lead on the issue.

"I don’t think anyone at the White House is paying attention to this," Schoettes, who is HIV-positive, told NBC News. "The HIV crisis and epidemic has not disappeared, it just disappeared from public view."

.........................

More than 10 months into his first term, Trump has yet to appoint an HIV/AIDS czar, making him the first president without one since President Bill Clinton created the position in 1993. Trump has not appointed someone to lead the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, and the office's informational page on the White House website is blank. Ten members remain on the Presidential Advisory Council, which Clinton also created in 1995, and its first and only meeting happened in August. The committee sent a letter to former HHS Secretary Tom Price warning him that repealing Obamacare would cause "catastrophic damage" to HIV prevention.
.....................................

 

Read more: https://www.nbcnews....ids-day-n824961



#3364
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New imaging study reveals how saturated fatty acids damage cells
December 2, 2017
 

 

In our increasingly health-conscious society, a new fad diet seems to pop up every few years. Atkins, Zone, Ketogenic, Vegetarian, Vegan, South Beach, Raw - with so many choices and scientific evidence to back each, it's hard to know what's healthy and what's not. One message, however, has remained throughout: saturated fats are bad.

A new Columbia University study reveals why.

While doctors, nutritionists and researchers have known for a long time that saturated fats contribute to some of the leading causes of death in the United States, they haven't been able to determine how or why excess saturated fats, such as those released from lard, are toxic to cells and cause a wide variety of lipid-related diseases, while unsaturated fats, such as those from fish and olive oil, can be protective.

 

https://medicalxpres...atty-acids.html



#3365
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This years flu vaccine only 10% effective against dominant strain H3N2
 

 

To get an idea of what a flu season in the U.S. will look like, scientists like Schaffner observe what happens in Australia, which experiences winter and the flu while Americans are having summer. In the summer of 2017, the flu was diagnosed in more Australians than the previous season — 168,337 versus 91,000 — with H3N2 predominant.

How effective is the 2017 flu vaccine?

Unfortunately, the flu vaccine in Australia, which is the same one available this fall and winter in the United States, was only 10 percent effective in preventing illness from H3N2.

“Typically in years when the predominant strain is H3N2, there are more hospitalizations, more severe disease and people tend to get sicker,” said Dr. Michael Ison, a professor of infectious disease and organ transplantation at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

Also, the vaccine protects against other flu strains.
“The protection against the others is much higher — 50 to 70 percent,” Schaffner said.

 

https://www.nbcnews....sm_npd_nn_tw_ma



#3366
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CVS agrees to buy Aetna in $69 billion deal that could shake up health-care industry
Source: Washington Post
By Carolyn Y. Johnson December 3 at 1:41 PM

 

Pharmacy giant CVS Health has agreed to buy Aetna in a $69 billion blockbuster acquisition that could rein in health care costs and transform its 9,700 pharmacy storefronts into community medical hubs for primary care and basic procedures, people familiar with the deal said Sunday.

The pharmacy chain agreed to buy Aetna for about $207 per share or $69 billion.

If approved by regulators, the mega-merger would create a giant health care company, allowing CVS to provide a broad range of health services to Aetna’s 22 million medical members at its nationwide network of pharmacies and walk-in clinics, and further decrease the drug store titan's reliance on the retail sales that have faced increasing competition.

And the deal is likely to set off even more mergers in the health-care industry, which has been undergoing consolidation and faces potential new competition from Amazon.

-snip-

 

Read more: https://www.washingt...-care-industry/

 

This will hurt a lot of people and increase cost of medical care. Sad.



#3367
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3D-printed ear implants can improve treatment for hearing loss

 

Scientists have 3D-printed accurate, custom-designed prosthetic replacements for damaged parts of the middle ear, paving the way for improved surgical treatments for hearing impairment.

The technique has the potential to improve a surgical procedure that often fails because of incorrectly sized prosthetic implants, researchers said.

Conductive hearing loss can be treated through surgical reconstruction using prostheses made from stainless steel struts and ceramic cups.

 

http://www.deccanchr...aring-loss.html



#3368
caltrek

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Below is an introduction to a fairly long article.

 

 

A prescription for healing the healthcare industry

 

https://techcrunch.c...hcare-industry/

 

Introduction:

 

(Techcrunch) The year is 1900. Life expectancy is 47 years. Almost all hospitals in the U.S. are nonprofit institutions founded by religious organizations. More people die in war due to infection than in battle.

 

Fast-forward to today. Healthcare in the U.S. has ballooned into a massive industry worth $3 trillion. The United States spends approximately $9,237 per person for healthcare, roughly three times more than most other first-world countries. And yet, all that spending has not resulted in superior outcomes.

 

While the graph above is striking enough to spur anyone to immediate action, the implications of this unsustainable growth in expenses and what can be done to stifle it are not as clear.

 

We can only solve the problems that we can see, and most entrepreneurs don’t have experience working in healthcare, almost by definition. Take the story of John Crowley, who started Amicus Therapeutics after his two children were diagnosed in 1998 with Pompe disease — a severe and often fatal neuromuscular disorder.

 

In his drive to find a cure for them, he left his job in management consulting and became an entrepreneur. He became founder and CEO of Novazyme Pharmaceuticals in 2000, a biotech startup conducting research on a new experimental treatment for Pompe disease, which he credits as ultimately saving his children’s lives. His story is nicely told in this interview with Tim Ferriss.

shutterstock_123073600.jpg?w=738


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#3369
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New study suggests antibiotics can weaken the immune system
Biology
Michael Irving

 

As more strains of bacteria become resistant to antibiotics, scientists are warning that we could soon return to the "dark ages of medicine," where our drugs are ineffective against even the most basic of infections. While investigating the side effects of antibiotics and how bacteria can develop resistance to them, researchers from MIT and Harvard have found that the drugs can actually work against the body, weakening the immune system's ability to fight off the bugs.

 

https://newatlas.com...e-system/52457/



#3370
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Do premature graying and hair loss increase your risk of heart disease?

https://newatlas.com...ase-risk/52458/

 

A new study presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the Cardiological Society of India suggests there could be a link between coronary artery disease and premature graying and baldness in young men. The researchers suggest that both baldness and greying are stronger risk predictors of heart disease than obesity.

The relatively small study matched 790 men with coronary artery disease under the age of 40, against a control of 1,270 healthy men. The results found that the men with heart disease had higher rates of both baldness (50 percent versus 30 percent) and premature graying (49 percent versus 27 percent) when compared to the control group.

 

 



#3371
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Breakthrough migraine therapy cuts number of attacks in half
Medical

 

For a condition that affects nearly 15 percent of the world's population, there are remarkably few effective treatments for migraine sufferers. A new antibody treatment designed specifically for migraine prevention has just completed Phase III human clinical trials with remarkably positive results, raising hopes of a possible revolution on the horizon for sufferers of this debilitating condition.

For the last few years there has been major work examining the role of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in activating migraines. Research has clearly shown that CGRP contributes to the pain conditions of a migraine, so scientists have been working on developing treatments that block the key CGRP receptors in the brain.

 

https://newatlas.com...s-trials/52455/



#3372
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Economist Larry Summers: 10,000 people will die annually from GOP tax bill
Source: The Hill

 


Economist Larry Summers said Monday that roughly 10,000 more Americans will die each year if Republican tax-reform legislation passes and includes a repeal of the ObamaCare individual mandate.

"I think this bill is very dangerous," Summers said on CNBC's "Squawk Box."

"When people lose health insurance, they're less likely to get preventive care, they're more likely to defer health care they need, and ultimately they're more likely to die." The Senate passed its tax-reform legislation early Saturday morning. The upper chamber's bill includes a repeal of the individual mandate, while the House's tax-reform bill does not.

Summers's estimate is based on a Congressional Budget Office report that 13 million Americans would opt out of ObamaCare if the individual mandate is repealed.

 

 

Read more: http://thehill.com/p...om-gop-tax-bill

 

This is pure evil. God I hate the republican party.



#3373
Yuli Ban

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^ I mean, most people who are going to die will be Republicans (elderly whites being the ones most likely to defer medical care if they don't believe they can afford it), so... depends on your empathy there how to take that.


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#3374
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NEST360's low-cost jaundice detector passes first test in Africa
December 4, 2017

The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts preparing for a Dec. 11 competition for $100 million from the MacArthur Foundation. The money would allow the team to carry out its visionary plan to halve the number of newborn deaths in African hospitals within 10 years.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...africa.html#jCp



#3375
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Researchers use nanoparticles to target, kill endometrial cancer
December 4, 2017

 

Tumor-targeting nanoparticles loaded with a drug that makes cancer cells more vulnerable to chemotherapy's toxicity could be used to treat an aggressive and often deadly form of endometrial cancer, according to new research by the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...cancer.html#jCp



#3376
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New tuberculosis drugs possible with understanding of old antibiotic
December 5, 2017

D-cylcoserine phosphate in complex with ADP and magnesium bound at the active site of E. coli D-ala-D-alanine ligase. Credit: University of Warwick

Tuberculosis, and other life-threatening microbial diseases, could be more effectively tackled with future drugs, thanks to new research into an old antibiotic by the University of Warwick and The Francis Crick Institute.

Led by Professor David Roper at Warwick's School of Life Sciences and Dr Luiz Pedro Carvalho from The Francis Crick Institute, a paper published today in Nature Communications reveals a deeper understanding of how the antibiotic D-cycloserine uniquely works at a molecular level.

This could lead to more effective future antibiotics - which are desperately needed to fight increasingly drug-resistant and deadly bacteria.

 

https://medicalxpres...antibiotic.html



#3377
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New technique enables harvesting of stem cells during a caesarian
Medical
Michael Irving

 

Stem cells have incredible potential for regenerative medicine, but getting hold of them in large enough numbers can be tricky. Amniotic fluid may be a plentiful source, and now scientists from Lund University in Sweden have developed a method and device that can collect the fluid during delivery of a baby by caesarean section, to safely harvest large amounts of stem cells.

With the ability to replicate into other cells in the body, stem cells are valuable as a potential starting point for treating a wide range of illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and Alzheimer's, and potentially restoring impaired hearing or vision. The problem is that current methods of extracting them are either invasive and painful – as is the case from bone marrow – ethically controversial when sourced from human embryos, or don't have a very high yield, such as from umbilical cord blood.

 

https://newatlas.com...em-cells/52477/



#3378
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Lab-engineered ovaries superior to hormone drugs in animal model
December 5, 2017

 

New research in rats suggests the possibility of bioengineering artificial ovaries in the lab to provide a safer, more natural hormone replacement therapy for women. A team from Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine found that the engineered ovaries were more effective than hormone therapy drugs at improving bone and uterine health and body composition.

"The treatment is designed to secrete hormones in a natural way based on the body's needs, rather than the patient taking a specific dose of drugs each day," said Emmanuel C. Opara, Ph.D., senior author and professor of regenerative medicine at the institute, which is part of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

 

https://medicalxpres...mone-drugs.html



#3379
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Cryo-EM reveals 'crown-like' structure of protein responsible for regulating blood flow
December 6, 2017

 

A team led by scientists at Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) has revealed for the first time the atomic-level structure of a promising drug target for conditions such as stroke and traumatic brain injury.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...nsible.html#jCp



#3380
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Existing cancer medication offers potential to treat Huntington's disease
December 6, 2017

A drug already used to treat certain forms of cancer may also be an effective therapy for Huntington's disease, according to a new study in the latest issue of Science Translational Medicine. The same study also increases our understanding of how this drug, and other medications like it, may offer hope for other neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease.

 

https://medicalxpres...on-disease.html







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Skin Cells, Brain Cells, Antibiotics, WHO, biotechnology, genetic engineering, bioprinting, cancer, evolution, transhumanism

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