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1979 vs 2013


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18 replies to this topic

#1
wjfox

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http://i.imgur.com/VyreUwU.jpg


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#2
Raklian

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That's only 33 years apart between the two. Imagine where we will be in 30 years from now with respect to our data storage capabilities... it's gonna be more dramatic than the above comparison due to exponential accelerating change. I won't be surprised 5 years will bring more change than the 33 years. 


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#3
SG-1

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Wow! I have a 32GB micro SD, and they have 64GB versions, I think by the end of the year they will come out with a 128gb micro and a 500gb SD.


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#4
FutureOfToday

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I think that by the end of the decade, we will have devices available that are able to carry thousands of times more data than our current laptops, tablets and smartphones.


Edited by FutureOfToday, 12 April 2013 - 01:17 AM.

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#5
SG-1

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I don't know about thousands, but just look at moore's law.  It follows a smooth exponential curve so give me a year and i'll tell you what the price of MIPS will be or amount of data on a SD card, or bandwidth available on the internet.


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#6
Casey

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I'm curious as to all those stats for 2017, 2027, 2037, 2047, and 2057, SG. Those are the years I turn 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70, so nice even cut-off points.

 

I remember the timeline saying that storage rates are expected to double every year this decade; is that beginning from this year forward? The biggest external hard drives around only to seem to be around 3-4 TB, which is a disappointingly small increase considering that the first terabyte hard drive was released in 2007. Not that computers aren't advancing at a wonderfully fast rate regardless, but yeah...

 

Also, I've always thought that it would be nice to have a stickied thread about computers (supercomputers and PCs) in 'In The News & Current Discussion."



#7
FutureOfToday

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Do you think it will ever be possible to create a small personal computer with infinite storage? If so, when do you think these might be available?

#8
Ru1138

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Do you think it will ever be possible to create a small personal computer with infinite storage? If so, when do you think these might be available?
Read "Planck Zero" by Stephen Baxter. ;)

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#9
EpochSix

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Mark Kryder has done lots of work on memory storage and has come up with "Kryder's Law", which is like the Moore's Law equivalent for memory.

http://en.wikipedia....#Kryder.27s_Law

 

He concludes that if hard drives continue to progress at their current pace, then in 2020 a two-platter, 2.5-inch disk drive will be capable of storing more than 14 terabytes (TB) and will cost about $40. The study itself, which also deals with upcoming memory technologies, is available at this link: http://www.dssc.ece....Hard_Drives.pdf


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#10
FutureOfToday

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I reckon in a few centuries we'll have infinite hard drives, to be honest. They'll find some way of doing it.



#11
Ru1138

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I reckon in a few centuries we'll have infinite hard drives, to be honest. They'll find some way of doing it.

 

Like I said, read "Planck Zero", the author (Stephen Baxter) has a background in mathematics and the story itself takes place in a physically realistic SF universe. The story shows a way of creating an infinitely powerful AI.


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#12
FutureOfToday

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I reckon in a few centuries we'll have infinite hard drives, to be honest. They'll find some way of doing it.

 Like I said, read "Planck Zero", the author (Stephen Baxter) has a background in mathematics and the story itself takes place in a physically realistic SF universe. The story shows a way of creating an infinitely powerful AI.

Will definitely have to look that up. I'll see if it's on Google Play.

#13
Ru1138

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Will definitely have to look that up. I'll see if it's on Google Play.  
If you can't find it there. Look for a short story collection called "Vacuum Diagrams", it has "Planck Zero" in it.

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#14
wjfox

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Do you think it will ever be possible to create a small personal computer with infinite storage? If so, when do you think these might be available?

 

Why would you need infinite storage? :)

 

Billions of years from now, I'd guess - if/when humanity evolves into a Godlike state. We're talking at least Type 4 on the Kardashev scale.



#15
FutureOfToday

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Wonder what we'll do with infinite storage?

#16
SG-1

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Count to infinity


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#17
FutureOfToday

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lol! Good idea! Maybe an infinite computer could be used as a highly advanced security system, holding the detail of every single atom in the universe in realtime.

#18
Yuli Ban

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So we're closer to the end of the decade. So much for "thousands of times more storage".

 

That said, we're waiting for SSDs to overtake HDDs. SSDs are what will allow for us to storage orders of magnitude more data.


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#19
Jakob

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I reckon in a few centuries we'll have infinite hard drives, to be honest. They'll find some way of doing it.

Berkenstein Bound. Limits to information density are finite.


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