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CERN scientists confine antihydrogen atoms for 1000 seconds


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#1
wjfox

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CERN scientists confine antihydrogen atoms for 1000 seconds

(PhysOrg.com) -- Seventeen minutes may not seem like much, but to physicists working on the Antihydrogen Laser Physics Apparatus (ALPHA) project at the CERN physics complex near Geneva, 1000 seconds is nearly four orders of magnitude better than has ever been achieved before in capturing and holding onto antimatter atoms. In a paper published in arXiv, a team of researchers studying the properties of antimatter, describe a process whereby they were able to confine antihydrogen atoms for just that long, paving the way for new experiments that could demonstrate properties of antimatter that until now, have been largely speculation.

Read more - http://www.physorg.c...ogen-atoms.html



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A schematic view of the ALPHA trap.
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#2
Caiman

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I wonder what real, practical applications might come of harnessing anti-matter. I expect the energy needed to fabricate it currently far outweighs the return we would get from annihilation?
~Jon

#3
CamGoldenGun

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I wonder what real, practical applications might come of harnessing anti-matter. I expect the energy needed to fabricate it currently far outweighs the return we would get from annihilation?

Jon, we need a 1:1 ratio of matter-antimater to create a stable warp bubble... lol

#4
OrbitalResonance

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Antimatter is great for generating power for space travel.

We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers. - Carl Sagan


#5
Prolite

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So how close are scientists to being able to build an anti-matter engine? Is it going to occur during this century?
I'm a business man, that's all you need to know about me.

#6
OrbitalResonance

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Probably not this century, but perhaps the next

We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers. - Carl Sagan


#7
Caiman

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I think science fiction has probably given us very high expectations of anti-matter as some kind of perfect fuel, as if we can capture and use 100% of the energy output when it annhilates with matter, but that is never going to happen and actually, unless we can discover a method of creating or somehow capturing anti-matter in huge volumes in a manner which doesn't use massively more energy going in than comes out, there may be other methods of power generation that will be much more accessible and powerful. Another major issue with anti-matter is the energy is takes to contain it, let alone create it.
~Jon

#8
OrbitalResonance

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Like harnessing power directly from a star and transport in it with microwormholes? Dyson Swarms or Spheres. (i like dyson swarms better) they seem much more realistic

We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers. - Carl Sagan





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