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Class War

class war class struggle social warfare class conflict rich poor elite billionaires bourgeoisie proletariat

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#21
Yuli Ban

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Blame the rich? You piggly motherfucking socialist! Blame educated elites? Yeah, take our country back from those elitist commies! I mean... Wow. You can't make this up. How are people this screwed in the head?

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#22
Yuli Ban

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Anyway, away from USican polarized politics, bully article

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#23
star0

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And it's a Bloomberg news opinion piece! The title is meant to be provocative; the actual contents are a sober analysis of historical trends around inequality, as well as some prediction for the future. The article reinforces my own belief that we could see riots and violence within the next few years, if unemployment increases or the economy starts to tank. I personally live a comfortable life; but I doubt I will be one of those labelled "elite".

#24
Yuli Ban

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http://www.washingto...e132_story.html

 

Last week, in a now-infamous letter to the Wall Street Journal, legendary San Francisco venture capitalist Tom Perkins compared “the progressive war on the American one percent, namely the ‘rich’ ” to the persecution of Jews in Nazi Germany. He went so far as to warn that an anti-rich “Kristallnacht” may be coming, referring to the night in 1938 when Jewish-owned stores, homes, hospitals, schools and synagogues were smashed throughout Germany and Austria.

As evidence, Perkins cited the Occupy movement; the fact that some people resent how Silicon Valley tech workers have driven up real estate prices and how they ride to work in special buses; and the “demonization of the rich embedded in virtually every word of our local newspaper, the San Francisco Chronicle.” He cited the Chronicle’s having called novelist Danielle Steel a “snob” despite her charity work. He neglected to mention that Steel is his former wife.

 

 

Perkins later apologized for the Kristallnacht reference but stuck to the rest of his thesis. 

 

You can't make this up.

 

The Left must rise again. 2009-2013 was the era of the Right being free to walk all over these issues unmitigated. It got to the point where talking about climate change and income inequality was "offensive." No longer.


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#25
WithoutCoincidence

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Both sides claim to be suppressed by the other. Ugh, what a headache.


The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

-Chris Impey, How It Ends


#26
Yuli Ban

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I'm guessing that criticizing the poor = promoting liberty, freedom, and the pursuit of happiness xD


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#27
Sciencerocks

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Social issues don't belong at the federal level. We have economic and infrastructure, science, and educational reform to worry about.

 

The right has gone off the deep end.



#28
MarcZ

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This is old news, also he came out and apologized for this comment after the media revealed that he had gotten off with only a $10,000 slap on the wrist for manslaughter in France back in the 1990s, not exactly someone to talk about people of committing genocide against him, when he killed someone else.

 

https://en.wikipedia...s_(businessman)



#29
ralfy

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The crisis is caused by problems that are inherent in capitalism, i.e., increasing profits from increasing sales made possible only through increasing credit, which in turn leads to one financial crash after another.

 

But this will be a walk in the park compared to a resource crunch coupled with global warming.

 

All three are affecting the global economy today.



#30
Yuli Ban

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The crisis is caused by problems that are inherent in capitalism, i.e., increasing profits from increasing sales made possible only through increasing credit, which in turn leads to one financial crash after another.

 

But this will be a walk in the park compared to a resource crunch coupled with global warming.

 

All three are affecting the global economy today.

I'd add automation to this list; according to Mother Jones at least. 

 

http://www.motherjon...tomation?page=2

Until a decade ago, the share of total national income going to workers was pretty stable at around 70 percent, while the share going to capital—mainly corporate profits and returns on financial investments—made up the other 30 percent. More recently, though, those shares have started to change. Slowly but steadily, labor's share of total national income has gone down, while the share going to capital owners has gone up. The most obvious effect of this is the skyrocketing wealth of the top 1 percent, due mostly to huge increases in capital gains and investment income.

Posted Image
According to this chart made by Stuart Staniford, our robot overlords will take over soon.

In the economics literature, the increase in the share of income going to capital owners is known as capital-biased technological change. Let's take a layman's look at what that means.

The question we want to answer is simple: If CBTC is already happening—not a lot, but just a little bit—what trends would we expect to see? What are the signs of a computer-driven economy? First and most obviously, if automation were displacing labor, we'd expect to see a steady decline in the share of the population that's employed.

Second, we'd expect to see fewer job openings than in the past. Third, as more people compete for fewer jobs, we'd expect to see middle-class incomes flatten in a race to the bottom. Fourth, with consumption stagnant, we'd expect to see corporations stockpile more cash and, fearing weaker sales, invest less in new products and new factories. Fifth, as a result of all this, we'd expect to see labor's share of national income decline and capital's share rise.

These trends are the five horsemen of the robotic apocalypse, and guess what? We're already seeing them, and not just because of the crash of 2008. They started showing up in the statistics more than a decade ago. For a while, though, they were masked by the dot-com and housing bubbles, so when the financial crisis hit, years' worth of decline was compressed into 24 months. The trend lines dropped off the cliff.

How alarmed should we be by this? In one sense, a bit of circumspection is in order. The modern economy is complex, and most of these trends have multiple causes. The decline in the share of workers who are employed, for example, is partly caused by the aging of the population. What's more, the financial crisis has magnified many of these trends. Labor's share of income will probably recover a bit once the economy finally turns up.

Doctors should probably be worried as well. Remember Watson, the Jeopardy!-
playing computer? In another decade, there's a good chance that Watson will be able to do this without any human help at all.

But in another sense, we should be very alarmed. It's one thing to suggest that robots are going to cause mass unemployment starting in 2030 or so. We'd have some time to come to grips with that. But the evidence suggests that—slowly, haltingly—it's happening already, and we're simply not prepared for it.

How exactly will this play out? Economist David Autor has suggested that the first jobs to go will be middle-skill jobs. Despite impressive advances, robots still don't have the dexterity to perform many common kinds of manual labor that are simple for humans—digging ditches, changing bedpans. Nor are they any good at jobs that require a lot of cognitive skill—teaching classes, writing magazine articles. But in the middle you have jobs that are both fairly routine and require no manual dexterity. So that may be where the hollowing out starts: with desk jobs in places like accounting or customer support.

That hasn't yet happened in earnest because AI is still in its infancy. But it's not hard to see which direction the wind is blowing. The US Postal Service, for example, used to employ humans to sort letters, but for some time now, that's been done largely by machines that can recognize human handwriting. Netflix does a better job picking movies you might like than a bored video-store clerk. Facial recognition software is improving rapidly, and that's a job so human there's an entire module in the human brain, the fusiform gyrus, solely dedicated to this task.

In fact, there's even a digital sports writer. It's true that a human being wrote this story—ask my mother if you're not sure—but in a decade or two I might be out of a job too. Doctors should probably be worried as well. Remember Watson, the Jeopardy!-playing computer? It's now being fed millions of pages of medical information so that it can help physicians do a better job of diagnosing diseases.

 


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#31
La Bodysnatcher

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Reading over SelMelvins's Mother Meki thread made me think: what will change between class relations in the future as automation grows in importance in the economy? Will there be a class war in the future?


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When you say "this is overrated" do you mean "I think this sucks?"

When you say "the majority hate it" do you mean "I hate it?"


#32
Yuli Ban

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Flattered to see I've already had an impact!

 

And yes, there will be class war. There will be blood. But chances are, 90% of it will be lower/middle class blood— at first.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#33
Raklian

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Flattered to see I've already had an impact!

 

And yes, there will be class war. There will be blood. But chances are, 90% of it will be lower/middle class blood— at first.

 

So, who will the AI serve at the beginning stages of the war? The bourgeois? The police state?


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#34
Mashallah

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Flattered to see I've already had an impact!

 

And yes, there will be class war. There will be blood. But chances are, 90% of it will be lower/middle class blood— at first.

 

So, who will the AI serve at the beginning stages of the war? The bourgeois? The police state?

 

You're naively assuming that the bourqeois aren't the ones who will control the police state.


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#35
Yuli Ban

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I think class war will come before AI head anything. As for class relations during automation... They'd have to be warmer somewhat. The poor can't work. Either the rich'll encamp us or give out basic income. Some may prefer the latter, which will keep a balance going, but some will claim it all to be a communist plot to take their money and resist... Which would wind up leading to a communist plot to take their wealth, tragically enough. Then AI will wonder why the monkeys are getting so bent out of shape for colored paper and plastic cards.

 

EDIT: No matter the subject on the matter, I can't help but repost this Mother Jones article. It's pretty much my end-all-be-all for how I feel the socioeconomics of the future will be shaped

http://www.motherjon...tomation?page=2

http://www.washingto...ll-of-our-jobs/


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#36
Yuli Ban

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Flattered to see I've already had an impact!   And yes, there will be class war. There will be blood. But chances are, 90% of it will be lower/middle class blood— at first.

  So, who will the AI serve at the beginning stages of the war? The bourgeois? The police state?

Maybe the burzhui will be taken down by AI, and the machines'll set up a police state

 

 

 

EDIT: Here's a fucked up idea. What if the rich use the excuse of "robots can't possibly take 100% of jobs; the poor just aren't trying hard enough. They deserve to starve if they can't pick up the pace! Ayn Rand said so."

Oh god, that's it. That really is it. There is no future for them if it comes to this.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#37
La Bodysnatcher

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Flattered to see I've already had an impact!   And yes, there will be class war. There will be blood. But chances are, 90% of it will be lower/middle class blood— at first.

  So, who will the AI serve at the beginning stages of the war? The bourgeois? The police state?

Maybe the burzhui will be taken down by AI, and the machines'll set up a police state

 

 

 

EDIT: Here's a fucked up idea. What if the rich use the excuse of "robots can't possibly take 100% of jobs; the poor just aren't trying hard enough. They deserve to starve if they can't pick up the pace! Ayn Rand said so."

Oh god, that's it. That really is it. There is no future for them if it comes to this.

 

If that ever happened there would be blood in the streets! But I think that if the Right were to support that even America would be in civil war mode. Unfortunately I can't see robots escaping the revolution either because i think the People would see them as a reason why they're suffering and try to destroy them and their makers.

By the way what does burzhui mean? I assume something to do with the rich


When you say "this is overrated" do you mean "I think this sucks?"

When you say "the majority hate it" do you mean "I hate it?"


#38
Yuli Ban

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Burzhui = Bourgeois in Russian, but with added scorn and derision. Sort of like the N word for the rich. Call the rich that, and you fucking mean bloody business, so never overuse it and dilute its power. Actually, I think class war and tech war will go hand in hand, since the rich will always get the better stuff first.

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#39
star0

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I think there will be lots of protests, and some violence, in the near future, caused by rising inequality. Here is how I envision this coming about: the thing that keeps our economy (Western economy) running is consumer spending, mostly from the middle class. As the middle class shrinks, due to automation, the economy will weaken. This will drive companies to invest more in automation and big data, to cut costs, becoming more efficient... which will ultimately reduce the number of middle class jobs even further. The cycle will continue, until something breaks. The scenario is very similar to one laid out by former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich. I only inserted one thing into his formula, the idea that a weakened economy actually increases investment in automation. The kind of automation I'm talking about here is NOT robots. Aside from factory work, which robots have been taking over for decades now, I don't think we will see advanced robots applied to jobs like janitorial work, and building construction for at least another decade. Where I see automation being used is in the form of A.I. software -- e.g. the descendants of Watson, SIRI, Google Now, and other such products. Not so long ago, I sat down and looked at a list of middle class jobs that could be impacted by A.I. software, and I was surprised how long it was. And even many lower-class jobs could be replaced. Let me just mention a few examples of both middle and lower-class jobs that will be replaced: * Legal Research currently is handled by small teams of lawyers using legal discovery software. In the past, this software didn't exist, so LARGE teams of layers were needed for this kind of work; and in the near future, the software will be much more capable, and will even include the ability to create legal arguments. This will mean that much fewer lawyers and paralegals will be needed to do the legal research than are needed now. * Using medical diagnostic software, and next-gen smartphone sensors, doctors will not be needed as much to do diagnosis -- your smartphone will be more accurate than board-certified doctors at diagnosing routine illnesses and conditions. Just to take one example: sleep disorders will be diagnosed by a tiny smartphone attachment; no need to go to a sleep clinic. I personally won't be going to a doctor for diagnosis if my smartphone can do it better. * Who needs a secretary if intelligent virtual assistants can schedule meetings; warn you when something important is coming up; read you emails; book flights and look for the best deals; take verbal commands like "email that report over to Bob"; and a long list of other things that secretaries now do? We're not talking about passing the Turing Test here -- this doesn't take full sentient A.I.; it just needs to be about 2 generations past Watson. * Banks are already planning to deploy advanced A.I. this coming year (I've seen the figures, and they are astonishing!) to help customers. I think eventually this will lead to a reduction in the number of tellers and human assistants that are needed. There is also some evidence that human loan officers aren't as good at making lending decisions as advanced software. * Copy editors at newspapers won't be needed as much, once grammar and fact-checking software becomes advanced enough. We are not there yet; but give it a few years. Newspaper photographers also will be replaced by next-gen smartphone cameras, with image-processing capability. There was a major newspaper in Chicago that did exactly that -- fired all its cameramen, and asked reporters to just use their iphones. * Imagine a program that you could give a crappily-written essay, and expect a stylistically perfect version as output. That would basically mean that if you can just tell a good story, you can be a writer -- you can write articles for magazines, or even short stories and novels. There are a lot of people who currently can tell a good story; but only a small fraction of those can also write brilliantly. Basically, then, this kind of software will be bad news for writers, as they will have MASSIVE competition; all that finely-honed verbal ability will be worthless. Interestingly, Narrative Science, a company that makes this kind of software, claims that their programs will produce, within just the next few years, articles that are Pulitzer Prize winner material. We're just about there... * Turbo Tax software already has cost many accountants their jobs. But we haven't seen anything yet: imagine when tax time rolls around, your virtual assistant simply looks up the tax codes, finds all the deductions you qualify for (knowing, as it does, all your purchases and personal finances), and then reports all this directly to the IRS (or equivalent in other countries). A few years ago, the IRS switched to allowing taxes to be entered online; and I think in a few MORE years, they will allow virtual assistants to report taxes for you -- you won't have to fill out a thing, not even a signature. * Professional translators are currently way better at their jobs than Google translate and other programs. But give it a few years. I'd guess that by about 2020 machine translation will be at about the level of a low-grade professional translator, at least for some language pairs. * Professional tutors: ever hear of the Digital Aristotle project? See: * Why do we have checkout lines in grocery stores? Many reasons... one is that stores have found that not everyone likes self-check-out; self-check-out can be slower; and, most importantly, it encourages theft. But what about if next-gen image recognition software were SO good that you wouldn't need barcodes, and that it could tell if you tried to steal something? And then what if instead of pulling out your card to pay, you just wave at an face recognition system, and it bills your bank account? That's closer than most people think; and once it arrives, stores may not need very many employees at all. We may, in fact, have stores that are open 24 hours a day, that only need workers to stock the shelves. If customers have questions about a product, a Watson-like AI system could answer them. * We also won't need security guards, once video recognition gets good enough. Companies might hire one guard to look over 100 properties; the software will monitor everything, and if it notices something unusual, it will alert the guard to investigate. And I could go on and on. I think we will have the technical ability to do many of these things by 2020; but it might take until 2023 to see mass-deployment across the economy. The net result of all this will be, as I said, a disaster for the middle class; and that will bring some kind of revolution -- I just don't think economic policy will change quickly enough to meet the challenge. Part of the problem is that politicians can't bring themselves to even discuss the topic, as it sounds to them like too much sci-fi; and even if they do discuss, too many people (conservatives) believe too strongly in market fundamentalism, and accept inequality as a non-problem. It's a disaster waiting to happen. Once the protests are over, and once the thousands of dead are buried, our society may start to look radically different. I can't say exactly which model we will see. I do think, however, that we may see some aspects of socialism.

#40
shane_allen

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There is class warfare now. It's been going, without rest, for many years now.

 

As we go into the future, I think that globalization will make class wars more relevant to nations that are currently wealthy.

As technology advances, those with access to these techs will have clear advantages until the lower classes get access to some of the more deadly stuff.

 

Also, we may see the working class be dramatically reduced. Automation and improvements in efficiency could lead to the whole basic income model being adopted in some form. This will alleviate the class pressures in those countries.

 

Far into the future, I think classes and nations will be defined more about what tech they have and how it's built into their society. I think the power structure will be pretty much settled. The upper crust will, possibly leave the lower end of the spectrum alone but that's so far beyond speculation that saying what that dynamic would be like is just story telling. I don't, however, think there'll be like, 5 equally powerful nations with basically equivalent technologies but with unique names and cool logos with different primary colors, like some sorta strategy game. 


Check out /r/futuretimeline and voice you opinion on when various technologies will emerge.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: class war, class struggle, social warfare, class conflict, rich, poor, elite, billionaires, bourgeoisie, proletariat

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