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Do you think you will still be alive in 100 billion years?


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#1
FutureOfToday

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I created a poll about how long people expect to live to - but this is a bit more specific. Do you expect to still be alive in the year 100,000,002,013 AD? It would appear that right now for some unknown reason I am unable to create a poll, so please comment with what you think!

#2
Zeitgeist123

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no.


“Philosophy is a pretty toy if one indulges in it with moderation at the right time of life. But if one pursues it further than one should, it is absolute ruin." - Callicles to Socrates


#3
Ewan

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No, the probability is basically zero. 



#4
EVanimations

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I think you'd have a hard time being alive when the universe is populated mostly by black holes.



#5
WithoutCoincidence

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The universe won't be that degenerate by 100 billion, even the stelliferous era won't have ended. I would like to think I'll live that long, but it's all too easy for something, anything, to happen in the meantime; 100 billion is a long time. If it came down to it, though, I could see people just going and living like hermits in the middle of intergalactic voids; damn near impossible to find someone in those, especially given that they are growing. Living to such incredibly long times might very well come down to that; minimalizing risk chances.


The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

-Chris Impey, How It Ends


#6
StanleyAlexander

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I think before that we will transcend time and the universe itself.  So, I don't expect to move through time at today's rate all the way to that year, but part of my time stream will exist then.


Humanity's destiny is infinity

#7
Rkw

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Just too long a timespan to possibly put forward a sensible guess.

 

It's possible, but in that space of time, even if I manage to live to the legendary "longevity escape velocity", my odds of survival would be minute.


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#8
Alric

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I think if we survive the next few thousand years then there is a decent shot at making it. It seems like the short term risks while we are trying to transition to a long lived immortal race are far more dangerous than the long term risks. If we make it to a million years old, then I think the odds are even better of making it.



#9
SG-1

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Yeah I agree with Alric, it would be interesting to see.

 

I wonder if we will be able to re-animate the long, dead and forgotten?

Perhaps we will.  Which can give any hope of living after they die - even if you don't believe in a creator.

 

I can see the people alive today being the "old ones".  You know, the first generations to attain immortality.  We may be 1 billion years old but we will always be the oldest!  That is a pretty awesome thing to think about.  People all over the world will be asking you what life was like pre-singularity, in the 20th century, etc.

We'd be pretty high-status.

 

Or not, and we all die in our 50s from alcohol and bad genes.


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#10
Italian Ufo

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very few chances...too much will go on by that time....but lets be optimistic



#11
Raklian

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If some of us do make it through 100 billion years, our present selves won't even recognize the beings we will become by then. They would have long forgotten that we once were here in this forum, typing these posts, dreaming of the future.

 

It's beyond incomprehensible.


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What are you without the sum of your parts?

#12
WithoutCoincidence

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I intend to remember, though. If I didn't remember, I wouldn't truly appreciate it.


The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

-Chris Impey, How It Ends


#13
SG-1

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I just tried to reason how long that would feel like.

We all know what 10 years feels like, so 10 years repeated 10 billion times.

 

Then I still couldn't rationalize it.  So 100 billion is 100,000,000,000

If you were to take away an entire human lifespan of 80 years, you'd get 99,999,999,920.  Doesn't really do jack to that number.

 

Raklian you think we'd forget this?  I'd imagine that the first 100 years of anyone's life would be the best remembered.  Trying to imagine what you did on a Wednesday 152,571,319 years ago may be a little hard though.  Imagine our intellectual capabilities by then though.  We may be able to processes all of that.

 

Good news is, if you did die your entire life would have to flash in front of your eyes.  That may take a while.


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#14
WithoutCoincidence

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Well, let's do some number crunching. 100 billion is several things. Firstly, it's almost seven and a half times the current age of the universe. It is twenty times the sun's current age, and about ten times its projected natural lifespan. 

 

Coming closer to home, and ignoring outside intervention(By us perhaps) Earth has harbored life for, lets call it four billion years, and will continue to do so for another one to two billion, let's call it 1.5. So it's almost 20x the total time Earth will harbor life. 

 

Smaller still, Earth has harbored complex life, as in after the Cambrian Explosion, for about 500 million years. So 100 billion is two hundred times the length that Earth has had complex lifeforms. Homo Sapiens Sapiens has existed about 200,000 years, so imagine all of human history; all its wars, natural disasters, tragedies, victories, sorrows and joys... five hundred thousand times. 

 

It's truly a mind-boggling length of time. But in the long view of the universe, even that's nothing; the last stars are predicted to wink out in about the year one hundred trillion.


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The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

-Chris Impey, How It Ends


#15
Frizz

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No.

Edited by Frizz, 10 May 2013 - 04:01 AM.

“Give me time and I’ll give you a revolution.”
- Alexander McQueen

#16
SG-1

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Well, let's do some number crunching. 100 billion is several things. Firstly, it's almost seven and a half times the current age of the universe. It is twenty times the sun's current age, and about ten times its projected natural lifespan. 

 

Coming closer to home, and ignoring outside intervention(By us perhaps) Earth has harbored life for, lets call it four billion years, and will continue to do so for another one to two billion, let's call it 1.5. So it's almost 20x the total time Earth will harbor life. 

 

Smaller still, Earth has harbored complex life, as in after the Cambrian Explosion, for about 500 million years. So 100 billion is two hundred times the length that Earth has had complex lifeforms. Homo Sapiens Sapiens has existed about 200,000 years, so imagine all of human history; all its wars, natural disasters, tragedies, victories, sorrows and joys... five hundred thousand times. 

 

It's truly a mind-boggling length of time. But in the long view of the universe, even that's nothing; the last stars are predicted to wink out in about the year one hundred trillion.

We just need to figure out time travel and universe hopping.  So we can keep on keepin' on


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#17
Raklian

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And it gets more mind-boggling than the seemingly infinite number that 100 billion is, we'll most likely to spend most of these years immersed in virtual worlds that speed up time by trillions of times than it does in reality.

 

How about that, eh? :)


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#18
SG-1

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This thread:

Posted Image


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#19
StanleyAlexander

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we are approaching infinity.


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Humanity's destiny is infinity

#20
Raklian

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we are approaching infinity.

 

One cannot approach infinity because that would imply we are already infinite.

 

How does one start infinity when it goes both ways forever...?


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What are you without the sum of your parts?




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