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Do you think you will still be alive in 100 billion years?


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112 replies to this topic

#21
StanleyAlexander

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we are approaching infinity.

 

One cannot approach infinity because that would imply we are already infinite.

 

How does one start infinity when it goes both ways forever...?

we ARE already infinite!  Infinite potential exists in all of us!  That's what existence is all about--life tending toward complexity, increasing exponentially.  Approaching infinity.


Humanity's destiny is infinity

#22
Italian Ufo

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This thread:

Posted Image

ahahahahaahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa



#23
kjaggard

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There are a few mixed feels on this for me.

 

If you think about being a one year old, one year seems a very long time to you. But once you hit your thirties years roll over like weeks and months. The longer you've lived the shorter a year seems. By 1 billion years old it may well seem that early centuries are like the vague memories of our infanthood. We'll view it as not fully developed, building the foundations to become fully developed people in whatever form that takes. Mortality will probably be viewed like we view sudden infant death syndrome.

 

But I think it's just as Likely that we'll have gone through several synthetic reincarnations, lifetimes stored on record but we are new people every several hundred years or so. Bodies and minds being altered and built in different ways but the core, the pilot of it all will be us still.

 

and maybe the boundries between us as individuals and maybe even the surrounding evironment will meld. We may still exist but in about the same way a cell exists in us. There may be this giant life form whose cells are the seething mass of humanity, it's thought the thoughts of a hive mind with it's own identity far more complex than the head of a single human could ever contain.

 

or we may be timeless entities by that point. where time doesn't flow in a linear route, and niether the multiverse or layers of dimensions bind us.

 

or we may never find the means to break the mortal binding. We may fix the diseases that kill the old now and be able to upgrade our bodies, but eventually the fragile web of brain matter will reach a limit that it cannot surpass and which tech can't bridge. and we will suffer collapse like house of cards, or begin fading away, forgetting who we were. Or even hitting a point where on more though, one more memory would so fundamentally change our brains that we would be snuffed out and something else would come to reside in our body.


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Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#24
SG-1

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I think the hive mind is more of a communication thing.

 

When we can all communicate instantly with anyone with the greatest degree of efficiency and expression - and then be able to comprehend it all.  This will make the news obsolete at the very least.  Governments will also be useless at that point.


Hey.  Stop reading.  The post is over.


#25
StanleyAlexander

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There are a few mixed feels on this for me.

 

If you think about being a one year old, one year seems a very long time to you. But once you hit your thirties years roll over like weeks and months. The longer you've lived the shorter a year seems. By 1 billion years old it may well seem that early centuries are like the vague memories of our infanthood. We'll view it as not fully developed, building the foundations to become fully developed people in whatever form that takes. Mortality will probably be viewed like we view sudden infant death syndrome.

 

But I think it's just as Likely that we'll have gone through several synthetic reincarnations, lifetimes stored on record but we are new people every several hundred years or so. Bodies and minds being altered and built in different ways but the core, the pilot of it all will be us still.

 

and maybe the boundries between us as individuals and maybe even the surrounding evironment will meld. We may still exist but in about the same way a cell exists in us. There may be this giant life form whose cells are the seething mass of humanity, it's thought the thoughts of a hive mind with it's own identity far more complex than the head of a single human could ever contain.

 

or we may be timeless entities by that point. where time doesn't flow in a linear route, and niether the multiverse or layers of dimensions bind us.

 

or we may never find the means to break the mortal binding. We may fix the diseases that kill the old now and be able to upgrade our bodies, but eventually the fragile web of brain matter will reach a limit that it cannot surpass and which tech can't bridge. and we will suffer collapse like house of cards, or begin fading away, forgetting who we were. Or even hitting a point where on more though, one more memory would so fundamentally change our brains that we would be snuffed out and something else would come to reside in our body.

Hell yes, especially the timeless entity part.  And the seething massive hive mind part, that will be some real shit by then, not just communications--we're talking billions of years here, don't forget.  But especially the timeless entity part.

 

This whole accelerating tech thing is just the latest episode in the universe show.  It's a continuation of biological evolution, chemical evolution, physical evolution...  the exponential acceleration observed in the tech of the 20th century - present has been going on since the beginning of the universe.  And we assume it will stop because we can't imagine what that exponential curve looks like after the singularity.  The singularity is not the end!  The limits are extreme, and the limits are where we are headed.  And at the bottom, at the quantum level, time starts to get weird. Therefore, WE will get weird.


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Humanity's destiny is infinity

#26
Alric

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If some of us do make it through 100 billion years, our present selves won't even recognize the beings we will become by then. They would have long forgotten that we once were here in this forum, typing these posts, dreaming of the future.

 

It's beyond incomprehensible.

 

Actually it is pretty easy to comprehend. Most people have forgotten a great deal of their very early childhood.  A lot people don't remember stuff when they were like two years old. You could say that your younger self could never imagine what you are today as well.

 

There is a lot of hope though, since for most people those memories are still there and often times if you have a little help triggering those memories you can recall them.



#27
CLB

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Statistically, there's no way anyone will live that long. Say you have a 0.0001% chance of dying every year from whatever unlikely circumstances. 1 ÷ 0.0001% = 10,000. So with those chances you'll still only live on average for 10,000 years. In order to live to 100,000,000,000 you'd need to minimize your chances of dying per year to 0.00000000001%, just to have a chance. Compared to =0.0000229314 currently, you'd have to reduce the danger you currently experience by 2,300,000 times. I did do all this right, didn't I?

Edited by CLB, 10 May 2013 - 08:07 AM.

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#28
WithoutCoincidence

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Think so. But like I said, with unimaginable future tech, and just hitchhiking out to the middle of an intergalactic void, it would be possible. Hard to find anything dangerous out there.


The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

-Chris Impey, How It Ends


#29
FutureOfToday

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Created this thread out of curiosity of the people who voted that they thought they would live forever in my previous poll. Very interesting posts!

#30
bee14ish

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I hope so, I can't imagine being dead forever...  

I wonder how we'll deal with population problems that far into the future, assuming a lot of people today keep living until that time along with more people being born every second, good god that's a lot of people.



#31
StanleyAlexander

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There's a lot of space in space.


Humanity's destiny is infinity

#32
Kabe Ayofe

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Even if I could, I'm not sure i'd want to. Aside from VR and space exploration, what would I do with all that time?!



#33
zen_mutiny

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[font="arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"]“On a long enough time line, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero.”[/font]

 

[font="arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"]- Fight Club[/font]


Edited by zen_mutiny, 11 May 2013 - 04:25 PM.


#34
WithoutCoincidence

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Very true, zen. Currently I see the max lifespan as being up until Proton Decay, provided it happens. If it doesn't, or we find a way to avoid it... who knows?


Edited by WithoutCoincidence, 11 May 2013 - 03:09 PM.

The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

-Chris Impey, How It Ends


#35
dreamer246

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I created a poll about how long people expect to live to - but this is a bit more specific. Do you expect to still be alive in the year 100,000,002,013 AD? It would appear that right now for some unknown reason I am unable to create a poll, so please comment with what you think!

No.Even if technology can allow me to live that long I definetely wouldn't want to.100 billion years worth of accumulated memories would drive me insane(unless I erased my memory every couple thousand years,but I wouldn't want to do that).



#36
Alric

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If you figure that the average person dies in 10,000 years, and there is 9 billion people on the planet, then using a half life equation(half of the people die every 10,000 years), you would be reduced to one person at the 3,306,720,000 year mark. So your odds are not actually as bad as you think. Yea the average person dies off quickly, in fact 450 million people die in the first 10,000 years but there are decent odds that at least one person is going to continue to survive on far past the average amount of time.



#37
Synthcraft

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Oh man, not at all. Haha. I mean if the Singularity actaully does happen and I somehow don't die in an accident or by a violent murder or from cancer, and if I'm in a machine or hive mind, and that hive mind can travel our thoughts to different dimensions and universes (if they actually exist), then yeah maybe. But 100 billion years is INCREDIBLY far away from now. Just think about how long a decade of time is and realize we only have history from a million years ago, not even a billion years ago, just millions. I wouldn't think that far ahead, to be honest, and just focus on what we can do for the near-future. As in, the next hundred years.



#38
Pwaa

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Me personally?  No.

I can't even say that we as a race will be around then, we have no idea what will have happened to our universe in that time, and it depends on how successfully we colonise on other planets because this one certainly won't be enhabitable then. 

 

Even if this was somehow possible, could the human mind really survive that long in-tact?

It already outlives its intended life-span quite regularly these days, and look at the states of the average >100 year old, their bodys aren't just shot, but normally their minds are too.  And, if this was achieved by moving my mind to some sort of other body, bio or mechanical, is that then really me, or a simulation of me?


Edited by Pwaa, 15 May 2013 - 01:00 PM.


#39
FutureOfToday

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I think that if you don't get your body 'upgraded' and eventually replaced with an artificial one, this feat would indeed be impossible, but by doing so, I don't think it's out of the question.

#40
zen_mutiny

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Very true, zen. Currently I see the max lifespan as being up until Proton Decay, provided it happens. If it doesn't, or we find a way to avoid it... who knows?

But, would that be an issue, if you're not made up of the same atoms that you were, say, 10 years ago?






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