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Computers & the Internet News and Discussions

computers internet Moores Law quantum computers silicon internet demographics wireless 5G supercomputers Google

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#1
wjfox

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The Next Five Years of Explosive Internet Growth, in Seven Graphs

By Derek Mead

This whole internet thing doesn't appear to be going away anytime soon, says a new Cisco report looking at growth trends in global traffic.

Read more: http://motherboard.v...in-seven-graphs
 


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#2
wjfox

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Intel Haswell processors offer 'longer battery life'

By Leo Kelion
Technology reporter

Intel has formally launched its Haswell family of processors.

The firm says the chips offer improved battery life and a leap in graphics power over the previous generation.

Intel is the leading PC chip-maker and its product refreshes typically spur on new laptop and desktop sales. Computers using the chips have already been unveiled at the Computex tech show.

However, studies suggest the market is in decline because of competition from smartphones and tablets.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...nology-22757865


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#3
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http://www.dvice.com...-palm-your-hand

 

Japanese company uses projection interface that tracks the surface moving and uses projected ultrasound to relay sensation to projections.


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Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
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#4
Raklian

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http://www.dvice.com...-palm-your-hand

 

Japanese company uses projection interface that tracks the surface moving and uses projected ultrasound to relay sensation to projections.

 

I wonder if this ultrasound technology could be adapted to tactile feedback for immersive virtual reality. It will have to be a lot more advanced and robust than it is shown here.


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#5
Sciencerocks

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SlashGear 101: Mac Pro 2013

http://www.slashgear.com/slashgear-101-mac-pro-2013-11285989/]SlashGear 101: Mac Pro 2013 - SlashGear[/url]

Apple doesn’t normally preview upcoming hardware, so when Tim Cook & Co. whipped out the new Mac Pro 2013 at WWDC 2013 this week you knew the company was particularly proud. Throwing away the old-style tower and completely rethinking not only the design, but the internal architecture, cooling, expansion, and ethos of a workstation, the Mac Pro 2013 will demand a new approach to computing from users, too, when it hits stores later this year. Read on as we break down what makes this Mac particularly special.

Design

Apple’s old Mac Pro has looked largely the same since 2006, a silver tower clad in perforated aluminum. The new Mac pro keeps the aluminum – now in a polished black finish – but otherwise changes everything, now a cylinder 9.9-inches tall and 6.6-inches in diameter. “It’s a pro desktop computer that can actually sit on your desk,” Apple says.


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#6
Sciencerocks

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Gesture controller uses webcam to control software in 3D

Adario Strange

Monday, June 10, 2013 - 4:06pm


It's starting to look like Leap Motion may have waited just a little too long to release its product, which was, incidentally, pushed back a few months again, from May to July 22. Just last week we told you about the WiSee Wi-Fi based gesture control hack, and now another company that has been working on gesture control for several years has unveiled a new development that instantly makes it more competitive with the Leap Motion.

Back in February, Israel-based eyeSight Mobile Technologies showed off the gesture control capabilities of its system that worked rather seamlessly as a 2D interface solution. The company has just posted a video that reveals an update to the software that includes the ability to simulate 3D tracking using the basic webcam already embedded in most laptops.

The demonstration video shows a user manipulating the 3D spatial controls of Google Earth with all the ease and smoothness that we've seen in similar videos showing off the Leap Motion. According to the company, the software allows any camera, in conjunction with the software, to control devices such as tablets, laptops, televisions, and even digital signage from up to 16 feet away.

You can see the new 3D gesture capabilities of the eyeSight system in action in the video below.

http://www.dvice.com/2013-6-10/gesture-controller-uses-webcam-control-software-3d]Gesture controller uses webcam to control software in 3D | DVICE[/url]


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#7
Raklian

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AMD unveils first-ever 5 GHz processor 

AMD today unveiled its most powerful member of the AMD FX family of CPUs, the world's first commercially available 5 GHz CPU processor, the AMD FX-9590. These 8-core CPUs deliver new levels of gaming and multimedia performance for desktop enthusiasts. AMD FX-9000 Series CPUs will be available initially in PCs through system integrators.

 

The new AMD FX CPUs will be available from system integrators globally beginning this summer. Two models will be available:

  • FX-9590: Eight "Piledriver" cores, 5 GHz Max Turbo
  • FX-9370: Eight "Piledriver" cores, 4.7 GHz Max Turbo

 

http://phys.org/news...-processor.html

 

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Still want to bet against PC gaming? :)


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#8
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^ That is awesome. :)



#9
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IBM's Watson is better at diagnosing cancer than human doctors

http://www.wired.co....-medical-doctor

 

-----

 

Remember Jeopardy? :o



#10
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Researchers overcome show-stopping problems with ferroelectric RAM
By Joel Hruska on June 13, 2013 at 3:01 pm
http://www.extremete...ram]Researchers overcome show-stopping problems with ferroelectric RAM | ExtremeTech[/url]

Over the past five years, NAND flash has gone from an exceedingly expensive storage solution that only a handful of customers could afford to a mainstream product used by millions of high-speed storage devices. This shift has been great for consumers and materially impacted the performance of even older systems, but NAND flash has long-term scaling and reliability issues. Researchers across the world have continued searching for alternative storage mediums that can store data for longer periods of time and use less power to perform read/write


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#11
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Google’s Project Loon uses giant balloons to bring affordable Internet


Brittany Hillen, Jun 15th 2013 Discuss [0] 
http://www.slashgear...86608/]Google?s Project Loon uses giant balloons to bring affordable Internet - SlashGear[/url]


On May 24, we reported on a tip that Google plans to launch wireless Internet service in emerging markets that have little or no access to the Internet. While the leaked details were extensive, one bit stuck out among the rest: the use of balloons to transmit signals over long distances. At least that aspect of the rumor has turned out to be true, with Google announcing the method as Project Loon.

According to Google, two of every three individuals on Earth either do not have access to the Internet, or don’t have access to a connection that is both fast and within their financial means – in some areas, individuals are faced with prices equal to more than a month’s paycheck. This issue isn’t going to resolve itself without thinking outside of the box, according to the company, and that is where the balloons come in.

 

This is really interesting


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#12
Sciencerocks

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Google using balloons to deliver sky-high Wi-Fi
http://seattletimes....html?prmid=4939
By Cecilia Kang

The Washington Post

 

Google is announcing Saturday it has 30 balloons floating over New Zealand to provide free Internet access to disaster-stricken, rural or poor areas.

Google has a truly sky-high idea for connecting billions of people to the Internet — 12 miles in the air — through giant helium balloons circling the globe that are equipped to beam Wi-Fi signals below.

Google will announce Saturday it has 30 balloons floating over New Zealand to provide free Internet access to disaster-stricken, rural or poor areas. Eventually, as the balloons move across the stratosphere, consumers in participating countries along the 40th parallel in the Southern Hemisphere could tap into the service.

 

 

WOW, they're already doing it!!! This technology could be deployed all over the world!


Edited by Matthew, 15 June 2013 - 07:48 AM.

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#13
Sciencerocks

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Chinese supercomputer tops the charts -- two years early

 

Tianhe-2, with 3.1 million processor cores and a lot of Chinese-build technology, is the new leader of the twice-yearly list of the world's 500 fastest supercomputers.

Stephen Shankland

http://news.cnet.com...wo-years-early/


Performing more than 33 quadrillion calculations per second, a new Chinese supercomputer called Tianhe-2 arrived two years earlier than expected to claim the top spot in a list of the 500 most powerful supercomputers in the world.

The Top500 list, updated twice a year at the International Supercomputing Conference, measures performance for mammoth systems typically used for jobs like modeling nuclear weapons explosions and forecasting global climate changes. And the Chinese machine, at the National University of Defense Technology, is more mammoth than most.
All that means the machine's sustained performance is 33.86 petaflops, or a quadrillion mathematical calculations per second, a figure all the more notable given that the researchers who compile the Top500 list expected Tianhe-2, also called Milky Way-2, to be deployed in two years.

Its performance is nearly double that of the machine now bumped to second place, the Cray XK7 system called Titan at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with a speed of 17.59 petaflops. Third place went to Sequoia, an IBM BlueGene/Q system installed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with a speed of 17.17 petaflops.
 

 


You could very nearly put two titans together!!!


Edited by Matthew, 17 June 2013 - 08:10 AM.

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#14
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GEAK Watch packs Android, WiFi and a plethora of sensors, likely 'world's first true smartwatch'

By Richard Lai posted Jun 17th, 2013 at 2:23 PM 126

GEAK Watch is 'world's first true smartwatch,' packs Android 41 and a plethora of sensors

Nowadays, we can't help but be skeptical of products that claim to be a smartwatch. In fact, what is a smartwatch, anyway? Perhaps GEAK, a Shanghai-based subsidiary of content giant Shanda, has a somewhat convincing answer. Simply dubbed the GEAK Watch, this wearable device packs a surprising number of components, with the most notable one being the 802.11b/g/n WiFi module. This lets the Android 4.1 system download apps directly or even receive OTA updates, but you can also create a wireless ad hoc network to do instant messaging with fellow users nearby -- the watch can apparently do voice-to-text input. There's also Bluetooth 4.0 and NFC for device pairing, along with GPS and FM radio -- yes, there's a headphone jack, too.

http://www.engadget....oid-china/]GEAK Watch packs Android, WiFi and a plethora of sensors, likely 'world's first true smartwatch'[/url]

NICE...Voice to text input!!!! ;)


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#15
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Team builds first integrated graphene digital circuit to function at gigahertz frequencies

3 hours ago by Bob Yirka report


Phys.org) —A research team with members from the U.S. and Italy has succeeded in building an integrated graphene digital circuit that is able to function at gigahertz frequencies. In their paper published in the journal ACS Nano, the team describes how they built their circuit, its performance, and its limitations.

Researchers around the world continue to look to graphene as a means to overcome the size limitations of silicon—making circuits smaller than 10nm. Graphene is an ideal candidate because electrons can pass through the single layer of carbon atoms as if they had no mass. Unfortunately, graphene is not a semiconductor, thus other materials have to be included in a device to allow graphene to be used in a circuit. To date, efforts to do so have met with limited success—current leaks at the juncture points leading to poor performance.

In this new effort, the researchers built a ring oscillator—a circuit used to evaluate the performance limits of digital electronic devices—based on graphene using a new technique (prior attempts by other teams to build such a device exhibited limited performance). To create a stronger connection between the graphene and other components, the team grew the graphene directly on them. Once all the pieces were in place, the team tested the device by applying electricity, slowly lowering the voltage. As they did so, the oscillation frequency increased—moving from 350MHz to 1.2GHz. Such a frequency is routine for silicon based devices but marks a new high point for those based on graphene.

In running their circuit, the researchers noted one feature of their device that was actually better than those based on silicon—performance wasn't degraded due to fluctuations in voltage.

 

 Read more at: http://phys.org/news...n.html#jCp]Team builds first integrated graphene digital circuit to function at gigahertz frequencies[/url]


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#16
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Huge 'holograms' offer medics more memorable classes
 
Technology reporter, BBC News
 

A system which uses an illusionary effect to help medical students master their subject has been pioneered by two London-based junior doctors.

They have demonstrated a 3D graphic of a kidney measuring 4m (13 ft) to demonstrate renal function at a "test lecture" last week.

It was one of a series of hologram-like animations they are developing.

However, the university which hosted the event, said it was not ready to be rolled out yet.

"The cost would be prohibitively expensive," said a spokesman for St George's, University of London. "It's more a proof-of-concept at this stage."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-22860678]BBC News - Huge 'holograms' offer medics more memorable classes[/url]


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#17
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ivee Sleek: Wi-Fi Voice-Activated Assistant

Meet ivee . . .

She answers questions, obeys commands, and controls other internet-connected devices.

Our world is changing, and already there are thermostats, door locks, security systems, light bulbs, and even vacuums that are connected to the Internet. How do we control all these devices? How do you manage your "Internet of Things"?

ivee Sleek is the first Wi-Fi Voice-Activated Assistant for the home that helps you manage and control your connected devices without any hands. In addition, ivee helps you set reminders, wakes you up on time, and even fetches live Internet content (like weather, stocks, and news) that is relevant to you. Our goal is to create a simpler and more natural way of interfacing with the Internet and your smart home.

http://www.kickstart...f=category]ivee Sleek: Wi-Fi Voice-Activated Assistant by ivee ? Kickstarter[/url]


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Surprising turns in magnetic thin films could lead to better data storage

12 hours ago by David L. Chandler

Surprising turns in magnetic thin films could lead to better data storage
 

A magnetic phenomenon newly discovered by MIT researchers could lead to much faster, denser and more energy-efficient chips for memory and computation.


 Read more at: http://phys.org/news...torage.html#jCp


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#19
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LG to mass-produce flexible displays for smartphones

Looking to get a leg-up in the bendable display market, LG Display is going full throttle ahead with production of the new technology for mobile devices.

LG Display is about to embark on the mass production of smartphone display panels that reportedly don't break, crack, or shatter -- because they can bend.

By the fourth quarter of this year, the electronics company plans to be supplying the flexible displays to a host of major clients, according to The Korea Times.

"We have completed the development of our first flexible displays. We will mass produce flexible displays from the fourth quarter of this year," the company told The Korea Times. "We will apply a 4.5th generation glass-cutting technology for the OLED flexible displays. Monthly capacity for the line was set as 12,000 sheets."

The push for flexible displays comes at a time of growing demand for new screen technology. LG spokesman Frank Lee told The Korea Times that one of the reasons the company was heading toward mass production was to meet "the rapid need for display advancements."

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57590173-94/lg-to-mass-produce-flexible-displays-for-smartphones/]LG to mass-produce flexible displays for smartphones | Mobile - CNET News[/url]


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#20
Raklian

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Using nanotechnology, researchers have developed a technique to increase the data storage capacity of a DVD from a measly 4.7GB to 1,000TB

 

In Nature Communications today, we, along with Richard Evans from CSIRO, show how we developed a new technique to enable the data capacity of a single DVD to increase from 4.7 gigabytes up to one petabyte (1,000 terabytes). This is equivalent of 10.6 years of compressed high-definition video or 50,000 full high-definition movies.

 

On the basis of this law, the diameter of a spot of light, obtained by focusing a light beam through a lens, cannot be smaller than half its wavelength – around 500 nanometres (500 billionths of a metre) for visible light.

 

And while this law plays a huge role in modern optical microscopy, it also sets up a barrier for any efforts from researchers to produce extremely small dots – in the nanometre region – to use as binary bits.

 

In our study, we showed how to break this fundamental limit by using a two-light-beam method, with different colours, for recording onto discs instead of the conventional single-light-beam method.

 

 

http://phys.org/news...abytes-dvd.html

 

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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: computers, internet, Moores Law, quantum computers, silicon, internet demographics, wireless, 5G, supercomputers, Google

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