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Computers & the Internet News and Discussions

computers internet Moores Law quantum computers silicon internet demographics wireless 5G supercomputers Google

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1423 replies to this topic

#21
Sciencerocks

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Watch the cost to decrease and the storage skyrocket. ;)


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#22
tornado64

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What's the point in increasing data storage of optical discs... They should increase internet speed so you don't need them in the first place...


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#23
kjaggard

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because network access is dependednt on outside sources and connections to work. If you can have a simple computer the size of a smart phone with the blueprints of every technological device ever made on a disc the size of a cracker that is a huge boon, especially if you have rendering software and a 3d printer.

 

But what about the internet? How well is that gonna work on mars? If a government shuts down internet like they keep trying to do in the middle east? if infrastructure collapses in natural disaster or from neglect or failed governments?

 

And if those don't happen, having thirty nodes with 1000 terabytes of data storage base allows for network redundancy. Think of it like a fractal or hologram. Cut it into smaller pieces and it's still the same image. Cut the network into smaller networks and it's the same network.


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#24
Sciencerocks

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Much faster Wi-Fi coming soon
 By David Goldman [MENTION=40697]DavidG[/MENTION]oldmanCNN June 19, 2013: 7:39 PM ET

Only a handful of Wi-Fi devices feature the new "ac" technology, including this Netgear router.

A new, faster version of Wi-Fi was officially rubber-stamped Wednesday.

The latest Wi-Fi technology, called "802.11ac," offers speeds of up to 1.3 Gigabits per second. That's fast enough to transfer an entire high-definition movie to a tablet in under 4 minutes, share photo albums with friends in a matter of seconds or stream three HD videos at the same time. It's more than double the top speed of the previous standard, known as 802.11n

"The ratification of the 802.11ac standard will significantly improve the usefulness of Wi-Fi to carriers," said Mike McCormack, analyst at Nomura Equity Research.

Carriers have begun testing out technology that automatically switches users from 3G and 4G networks to Wi-Fi. As the number of "ac" mobile devices grow, McCormack said consumers may all soon be connecting to Wi-Fi networks without even knowing it

http://money.cnn.com/2013/06/19/technology/mobile/wifi-speeds/index.html]New Wi-Fi tech doubles connection speeds - Jun. 19, 2013[/url]


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#25
Sciencerocks

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because network access is dependednt on outside sources and connections to work. If you can have a simple computer the size of a smart phone with the blueprints of every technological device ever made on a disc the size of a cracker that is a huge boon, especially if you have rendering software and a 3d printer.

 

But what about the internet? How well is that gonna work on mars? If a government shuts down internet like they keep trying to do in the middle east? if infrastructure collapses in natural disaster or from neglect or failed governments?

 

And if those don't happen, having thirty nodes with 1000 terabytes of data storage base allows for network redundancy. Think of it like a fractal or hologram. Cut it into smaller pieces and it's still the same image. Cut the network into smaller networks and it's the same network.

 

 

That's what's so wonderful about project "LOON". Put up about 1,000 Wi-Fi balloons within the stratosphere and no government will be able to stop the internet.


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#26
kjaggard

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give me a high power rifle, or a wi-fi frequency jammer and I'll gladly accept that challenge.

 

Think of your information tech like a lifeform. How crappy a lifeform is it that can't do anything itself, it's like a full grown adult in a vegetative state. Yes internet tech is great for some things but to rely on that being the core of all information tech is just begging for collapse and turning everything you have into a paperweight.

 

You don't outsource your pulse and breathing and hope this weeks cardiopulminary source is dependable.


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Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#27
wjfox

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Graphene circuit breaks the gigahertz barrier

Researchers in the US and Italy have made the first integrated graphene digital circuits that function at gigahertz frequencies. The circuits are ring oscillators and the work could be an important step towards realizing all-graphene microwave circuits, says the team.

Graphene is a 2D sheet of carbon just one atom thick and it – along with similar 2D materials such as carbon nanotubes and molybdenite – shows great promise for future electronics. This is because electronic devices smaller than 10 nm could be made using these 2D materials – at least in principle. Below the 10 nm length scale, devices based on conventional silicon are expected to be too small to function properly and therefore graphene and similar materials offer a route to making ever-smaller electronic devices.

Read more - http://physicsworld....gahertz-barrier


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#28
Thaizasaskand

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Now that Opus is out of the way, Xiph Foundation seem to be putting more effort into Daala. They have recently made their first release on their new video compression technology: http://people.xiph.o...ala/demo1.shtml



#29
wjfox

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Tech is at a tipping point

 

The number of smartphones shipped worldwide overtook, for the first time, the number of feature phones shipped earlier this year.

About 216 million smartphones were shipped during the first quarter, compared to the 212.5 million "dumb" phones.

 

http://money.cnn.com...ng-point/2.html

 

 

Posted Image



#30
kjaggard

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I'm waiting for the cost to drop. Stop adding features and give me a basic i-phone 2 capable smart phone for under fifty bucks and I'll consider buying one. and please make the thing sturdy enough to last five years.


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#31
wjfox

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Next generation graphics...

 

 

 

 


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#32
StanleyAlexander

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Quantum Memory Breakthrough

 

 

In the worldwide drive to build a useful quantum computer, the simple-sounding task of effectively preserving quantum information in a quantum memory is a major challenge. The same physics that makes quantum computers potentially powerful also makes them likely to experience errors, even when quantum information is just being stored idly in memory. Keeping quantum information "alive" for long periods, while remaining accessible to the computer, is a key problem.

 

The Sydney-Dartmouth team's results demonstrate a path to what is considered a holy grail in the research community: storing quantum states with high fidelity for exceptionally long times, even hours according to their calculations. Today, most quantum states survive for tiny fractions of a second.

 

From Science Daily


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#33
skiier4384

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Leap Motion releases it's Motion Controlled App Store, plus is ready for Beta testing for 10,000 Developers

 

Posted Image

 

 

Posted Image

 

This could potentially revolutionize the computer industry, leading to the end of the mouse and the beginning of an era not too different than the way computers are used in Minority Report or how Tony Stark uses 3D gestures to control computers in Iron Man 3. It's 100 times more accurate than X-Box One's latest version of kinect. Once this approaches 95% of the accuracy of the mouse, I predict it will replace it (probably around 2017).

 

http://mashable.com/...otion-airspace/

 

http://news.cnet.com...-running-start/

 

http://techcrunch.co...developer-beta/


Edited by skiier4384, 26 June 2013 - 04:00 AM.

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#34
Sciencerocks

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Large-scale quantum chip validated

14 minutes ago

A team of scientists at USC has verified that quantum effects are indeed at play in the first commercial quantum optimization processor.

The team demonstrated that the D-Wave processor housed at the USC-Lockheed Martin Quantum Computing Center behaves in a manner that indicates that quantum mechanics plays a functional role in the way it works. The demonstration involved a small subset of the chip's 128 qubits.

 Read more at: http://phys.org/news...jCp]Large-scale quantum chip validated[/url]


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#35
Raklian

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Once this approaches 95% of the accuracy of the mouse, I predict it will replace it (probably around 2017).

 

I believe that this sort of technology will be great for large display surfaces like intelligent windows or mirrors, but it's also competing with simple touch screens, which imho are better suited and superior for small devices. There might also be a duality, it doesn't have to be either/or, small devices and intelligent surfaces might make use of both touch and gesture control, but when I think of how I use small screens, touch is easy and a better experience because physically touching the device ads a sense of control. Using gesture control for a meter, or two-meter wide screen is, I think going to be a better way than touch because it removes you needing to drag something from one side to the other, and it really will be more fun on large surfaces.

For the decent price, I'm happy to buy a leap motion controller and give it a try, but I don't know if they've brought it out at just the right time yet. I think gesture control will really flourish when we've got 'mirror, mirror on the wall'.

 

The duality you were speaking of - why not use your finger as a mouse? The Leap Motion device still can be used for this one.


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#36
Sciencerocks

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How do you people feel about the quantum computer? ;)


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#37
Squillimy

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^^^ i believe that it'll be in research for a long time just as computers and televisions were in research for a long time during the 1900's. It's funny, we look at them now and see how the research is going and how long until we have a readily available quantum computer. Then just like our computers they will likely start as large super computers progressively working their way down, until we can finally go to best buy and buy a quantum-laptop computer. What we will do with all that power? I have no idea, but that's no means to be naive and say that there is no use for it. The computer applications of late this century would blow ours out of the water. We try to relate the future of computers by compariing them with computers of today. The average joe thinks that with more space we will simply "Download more games, more music, more movies" when this isn't the case. We will have new applications that our computer will allow us to do that we can't even imagine. 


What becomes of man when the things that man can create are greater than man itself?


#38
Ru1138

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What Can We Expect From The Next Decade of Technology?
Technology tends to run in cycles. Microsoft ruled the 90s by building essential software for enterprises. Then Apple created a new device driven marketplace in which the consumer was king.  What will drive the next decade?

 

While these things are always hard to predict with any specificity, much of the writing is already on the wall. Humanlike, no-touch interfaces will be combined with a pervasive array of sensors and intelligent back-end systems to form a new Web of Things. Computing will become truly ubiquitous.

 

This next era of computing will be different than anything we’ve seen before. Technology will cease to be something we turn on and off, but will become an inextricable part our environment and ourselves. It is a future that is both utopian and dystopian (depending on your perspective), in that the human experience will change dramatically.


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What difference does it make?


#39
Sciencerocks

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MIT researchers build an all-optical transistor

14 minutes ago by Larry Hardesty

Optical computing—using light rather than electricity to perform calculations—could pay dividends for both conventional computers and quantum computers, largely hypothetical devices that could perform some types of computations exponentially faster than classical computers.

 Read more at: http://phys.org/news...or.html#jCp]MIT researchers build an all-optical transistor[/url]


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#40
caltrek

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http://au.businessin...-profile-2013-6

 

Besides being leading the world’s largest intelligence agency, (Four-Star General Keith) Alexander is also in charge of the Central Security Service, US Cyber Command, the Navy’s 10th Fleet, the 24th Air Force, and the Second Army. He basically controls his own military.

His vision of cybersecurity boils down to putting the Internet under his personal control.

Here’s a quick excerpt from the Wired profile: 

In his telling, the threat is so mind-bogglingly huge that the nation has little option but to eventually put the entire civilian Internet under his protection, requiring tweets and emails to pass through his filters, and putting the kill switch under the government’s forefinger. “What we see is an increasing level of activity on the networks,” he said at a recent security conference in Canada. “I am concerned that this is going to break a threshold where the private sector can no longer handle it and the government is going to have to step in.”

While the concept of engaging in cyberwarfare seems like something out of science fiction, General Alexander has been preparing for such a scenario for nearly eight years. Stuxnnet, the malware developed by the NSA in collaboration with the CIA and Israeli intelligence, was used to physically damage centrifuges used in Iran’s nuclear program in 2007. 

That was only a first step. According to Bloomberg, Alexander has asked for nearly $4.7 billion in additional funding in 2014 alone to further bolster the United States’ “cyberspace operations.”

 

Also in the Wired magazine article:

Alexander also proved to be militant about secrecy. In 2005 a senior agency employee named Thomas Drake allegedly gave information to The Baltimore Sun showing that a publicly discussed program known as Trailblazer was millions of dollars overbudget, behind schedule, possibly illegal, and a serious threat to privacy. In response, federal prosecutors charged Drake with 10 felony counts, including retaining classified documents and making false statements. He faced up to 35 years in prison - despite the fact that all of the information Drake was alleged to have leaked was not only unclassified and already in the public domain but in fact had been placed there by  NSA (National Security Agency) and Pentagon officials themselves.

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: computers, internet, Moores Law, quantum computers, silicon, internet demographics, wireless, 5G, supercomputers, Google

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