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Computers & the Internet News and Discussions

computers internet Moores Law quantum computers silicon internet demographics wireless 5G supercomputers Google

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1421 replies to this topic

#61
RayMC

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Wait... What?? We have made a quantum computer? Where the hell have i been. Fantastic news. Too bad it costs $10 000 000 though.


“Wʜᴀᴛ ɪs ɴᴏᴡ ᴘʀᴏᴠᴇᴅ, ᴡᴀs ᴏɴᴄᴇ ᴏɴʟʏ ɪᴍᴀɢɪɴᴇᴅ.” - Wɪʟʟɪᴀᴍ Bʟᴀᴋᴇ


#62
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Wait... What?? We have made a quantum computer? Where the hell have i been. Fantastic news. Too bad it costs $10 000 000 though.

 

Although a quantum computer does exist, it won't help you do your everyday computing stuff like surfing the Internet, type papers with Word, play PC games, etc. At this point quantum computers only can do certain problems that classical computers cannot do.

 

Some even say this can be resolved by creating a classic/quantum hybrid computer.


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#63
EVanimations

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That's amazing! The next step up from silicon has been reached. :)

 

I guess Moore's Law can continue as planned.



#64
Raklian

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That's amazing! The next step up from silicon has been reached. :)

 

I guess Moore's Law can continue as planned.

 

More like Moore's Law is really lagging behind. :)


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#65
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#66
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Paper-thin e-skin responds to touch by lighting up

 

23 July 2013

 

Posted Image

 

A new milestone by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can help robots become more touchy-feely, literally. A research team led by Ali Javey, UC Berkeley associate professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences, has created the first user-interactive sensor network on flexible plastic.

The new electronic skin, or e-skin, responds to touch by instantly lighting up. The more intense the pressure, the brighter the light it emits.

"We are not just making devices; we are building systems," said Javey, who also has an appointment as a faculty scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. "With the interactive e-skin, we have demonstrated an elegant system on plastic that can be wrapped around different objects to enable a new form of human-machine interfacing."

 

http://www.spacedail...ing_up_999.html


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#67
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I've read somewhere that the computational power of a quantum computer doubles for each qbit added. Is that true?

I even think it already has a name, 'Rose's Law.'

http://www.flickr.co...son/8054771535/

And as for what you were saying,

 

http://www.theglobea...27613/?page=all

 

The company could be on the verge of unleashing vast computing power. Quantum computers handle information in a fundamentally different way than so-called classical computers. A D-Wave processor doubles in power every time its developers add a quantum bit, or qubit, a basic building block that is the equivalent of transistors in classical silicon chips. As it prepares to launch a 512-qubit product before the end of 2012, the company has proven that it can roughly double the number of qubits every year.

Edited by The Young Homo Maximus, 26 July 2013 - 07:51 PM.

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#68
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Wait... What?? We have made a quantum computer? Where the hell have i been. Fantastic news. Too bad it costs $10 000 000 though.

 Although a quantum computer does exist, it won't help you do your everyday computing stuff like surfing the Internet, type papers with Word, play PC games, etc. At this point quantum computers only can do certain problems that classical computers cannot do. Some even say this can be resolved by creating a classic/quantum hybrid computer.

I know that it's of no use now. But I still want it to brute force some passwords lol.

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#69
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Wait... What?? We have made a quantum computer? Where the hell have i been. Fantastic news. Too bad it costs $10 000 000 though.

Yeah, computer technology's like that.


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#70
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Speed limit set for ultrafast electrical switch

 

Quote:
Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have clocked the fastest-possible electrical switching in magnetite, a naturally magnetic mineral. Their results could drive innovations in the tiny transistors that control the flow of electricity across silicon chips, enabling faster, more powerful computing devices.

Scientists using SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser found that it takes only 1 trillionth of a second to flip the on-off electrical switch in samples of magnetite, which is thousands of times faster than in transistors now in use. The results were published July 28 in Nature Materials.

"This breakthrough research reveals for the first time the 'speed limit' for electrical switching in this material," said Roopali Kukreja, a materials science researcher at SLAC and Stanford University who is a lead author of the study.

Read more at: Speed limit set for ultrafast electrical switch


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#71
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Nokia releases augmented reality job search

Nokia releases augmented reality job search | DVICE

 

Quote:
Augmented reality has served a few purposes, such as giving us Japanese pop singers in boxes. Nokia decided it might have a more useful purpose, so on Friday the company launched an augmented reality job search app called JobLens.

The Windows 8 app could be the future of job hunting. Instead of simply offering a list of jobs, as most of us are used to, JobLens uses augmented reality to display jobs over a map, showing exactly where the offices are in relation to your home.

It also dives into your social media to see if any of your friends are connected with a hiring manager at any available jobs. Finally, it allows for easy resume sharing and even directions to any interviews to which you might be invited.

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#72
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Researchers discover novel material for cooling of electronic devices

 

Quote:
A team of theoretical physicists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Boston College has identified cubic boron arsenide as a material with an extraordinarily high thermal conductivity and the potential to transfer heat more effectively from electronic devices than diamond, the best-known thermal conductor to date.

As microelectronic devices become smaller, faster and more powerful, thermal management is becoming a critical challenge. This work provides new insight into the nature of thermal transport at a quantitative level and predicts a new material, with ultra-high thermal conductivity, of potential interest for passive cooling applications.

Read more at: Researchers discover novel material for cooling of electronic devices


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#73
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Sony and Panasonic team to develop 300GB optical discs
 

 


The push by major tech companies over the last few years to get everyone to embrace cloud computing suffered a major setback in recent months as new data privacy concerns have been raised around some of the top brands in Silicon Valley. Of course, not everyone bought into the notion of storing everything from your personal diary to your financial information in the cloud, a fact that has allowed removable storage to just barely survive the cloud trend. Now two major Japanese tech companies have announced a partnership that could ensure the future of consumer-ready local storage for years to come.

Sony and Panasonic have just entered into an agreement to work together to develop a new super high capacity 300-gigabyte memory disc. In the joint announcement from the two companies, the move is said to target professional-use customers looking for long-term digital data storage solutions. The new disks are also meant to ensure inter-generational compatibility between various formats, thus cutting down the frequency of archiving updates required when storage mediums inevitably shift due to changes in hardware constructs.

 


Sony and Panasonic team to develop 300GB optical discs | DVICE

Posted Image

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#74
RayMC

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I still don't know why we need so much space since even the PS3 games have never used more than 50 GB.


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#75
Raklian

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Future quantum computers with machine learning could attack larger sets of data than classical computers

Seth Lloyd of MIT and his collaborators have developed a quantum version of machine learning — a type of AI in which programs can learn from previous experience to become progressively better at finding patterns in data. It would take advantage of quantum computations to speed up machine-learning tasks exponentially, Nature News reports.

 

Data can be split into groups — a task that is at the core of handwriting- and speech-recognition software — or can be searched for patterns. Massive amounts of information could therefore be manipulated with a relatively small number of qubits.

 

“We could map the whole Universe — all of the information that has existed since the Big Bang — onto 300 qubits,” Lloyd says.

 

Such quantum AI techniques could dramatically speed up tasks such as image recognition for comparing photos on the web or for enabling cars to drive themselves — fields in which companies such as Google have invested considerable resources.

 

http://www.kurzweila...sical-computers

 

Posted Image

 

 

 

Whole Universe with just 300 qubits, eh?

 

Didn't D-Wave plan on creating a 512-qubit quantum computer soon? Mind-boggling.

 

Still, something tells me that at this point even we develop a quantum computer with 512 qubits, we won't be able to use all of these qubits in a way we will ultimately achieve after overcoming a few technological hurdles.

 

Still mind-boggling, though.


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#76
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Google and NASA have both a D-wave 2 already. And yes, they are using it for exactly what you listed.


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#77
Yuli Ban

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Sony and Panasonic team to develop 300GB optical discs
 

 


The push by major tech companies over the last few years to get everyone to embrace cloud computing suffered a major setback in recent months as new data privacy concerns have been raised around some of the top brands in Silicon Valley. Of course, not everyone bought into the notion of storing everything from your personal diary to your financial information in the cloud, a fact that has allowed removable storage to just barely survive the cloud trend. Now two major Japanese tech companies have announced a partnership that could ensure the future of consumer-ready local storage for years to come.

Sony and Panasonic have just entered into an agreement to work together to develop a new super high capacity 300-gigabyte memory disc. In the joint announcement from the two companies, the move is said to target professional-use customers looking for long-term digital data storage solutions. The new disks are also meant to ensure inter-generational compatibility between various formats, thus cutting down the frequency of archiving updates required when storage mediums inevitably shift due to changes in hardware constructs.

 


Sony and Panasonic team to develop 300GB optical discs | DVICE

Posted Image

This is nowhere near as impressive as the 1PB storage disk mentioned on the first page, but I bet these would be a whole lot cheaper! 


Edited by The Young Homo Maximus, 31 July 2013 - 10:22 PM.

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#78
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http://gizmodo.com/u...e-arm-986911633

USB Is Getting a 10Gbps Shot in the Arm

The USB 3.0 Promoter Group—honestly, there is such a thing—has finalized the next iteration of Universal Serial Bus, and it's going to run at a lightning fast 10Gbps.

The .1 upgrade will be entirely backwards compatible USB 3.0 and 2.0 kit but will obviously need 3.1 kit to run at full speed. The idea of 3.1 was floated back in January, but now it's official—though there's still no word on when the first USB 3.1 devices will arrive. It seems likely, however, that products should be available in the new year.


Hey.  Stop reading.  The post is over.


#79
iwashereb4

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quantum computers are here:

 

http://www.nature.co...company-1.13212



#80
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World's lightest and thinnest circuits pave way for 'imperceptible electronics'

 


Edited by TheAsianGuy_LOL, 01 August 2013 - 10:51 PM.

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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: computers, internet, Moores Law, quantum computers, silicon, internet demographics, wireless, 5G, supercomputers, Google

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