Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

These ads will disappear if you register on the forum

Photo

Computers & the Internet News and Discussions

computers internet Moores Law quantum computers silicon internet demographics wireless 5G supercomputers Google

  • Please log in to reply
1424 replies to this topic

#81
Brohanne Jahms

Brohanne Jahms

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 598 posts
Simulating 1 second of real brain activity takes 40 minutes and 83K processors

http://gigaom.com/20...83k-processors/

 

Anyone want to do a calculation using Moore's law on when we'll be able to simulate a brain on a $1000 dollar computer based on this? Probably not accurate since they mention software tuning, but it'd still be interesting.



#82
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,760 posts

Maybe 2150?


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#83
Raklian

Raklian

    An Immortal In The Making

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,514 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC
Maybe 2150?

 

Way too pessimistic!


  • eacao likes this
What are you without the sum of your parts?

#84
Zeitgeist123

Zeitgeist123

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,802 posts

Parasitic Humanoid: 

 

-developed by a team at Osaka University in Japan, turns the previously mentioned force feedback into the ultimate tool for skill transmission. Basically, the device is worn on the head, and sensors spread out to the different parts of the wearer’s body. As the person goes through the motions of an activity, the computer learns what the proper movements should be. Eventually, it’s able to “teach” those motions to someone else using force feedback.

 

 

 

 As the system improves, the researchers plan to use a single parasite that’s already been programmed with the desired skill. In the relatively near future, you might be able to buy a Parasitic Humanoid, download any skill, and learn it almost immediately.


Edited by Zeitgeist123, 05 August 2013 - 06:33 PM.

  • Raklian likes this

“Philosophy is a pretty toy if one indulges in it with moderation at the right time of life. But if one pursues it further than one should, it is absolute ruin." - Callicles to Socrates


#85
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,760 posts

ReRAM, the memory tech that will eventually replace NAND flash, finally comes to market

A new memory technology company, Crossbar, has broken cover with a new ReRAM design it claims will allow for commercialization of the technology. The company’s claims aren’t strictly theoretical; today’s announcement reveals that the design firm has successfully implemented the architecture in silicon. While that’s not the same as initiating mass production, it’s an important step in the search for a NAND flash replacement.

ReRAM (also known as RRAM) works by creating resistance rather than directly storing charge. An electric current is applied to a material, changing the resistance of that material. The resistance state can then be measured and a “1″ or “0″ is read as the result. Much of the work done on ReRAM to date has focused on finding appropriate materials and measuring the resistance state of the cells. ReRAM designs are low voltage, endurance is far superior to flash memory, and the cells are much smaller — at least in theory.

http://www.extremete...to-market]ReRAM, the memory tech that will eventually replace NAND flash, finally comes to market | ExtremeTech[/url]


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#86
TransAustin

TransAustin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 276 posts
  • LocationSan Diego, CA

Samsung now mass producing 3D verticle NAND flash chips with twice the speed and reliability of 10nm chips!

http://www.androidce...and-flash-chips


Edited by TransAustin, 06 August 2013 - 07:40 AM.

  • Sciencerocks likes this

#87
RayMC

RayMC

    F̷̲̅ᴜ̷̲̅ᴛ̷̲̅ᴜ̷̲̅ʀ̷̲̅ᴇ̷̲̅

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
Simulating 1 second of real brain activity takes 40 minutes and 83K processors

http://gigaom.com/20...83k-processors/

 

Anyone want to do a calculation using Moore's law on when we'll be able to simulate a brain on a $1000 dollar computer based on this? Probably not accurate since they mention software tuning, but it'd still be interesting.

 

2030


“Wʜᴀᴛ ɪs ɴᴏᴡ ᴘʀᴏᴠᴇᴅ, ᴡᴀs ᴏɴᴄᴇ ᴏɴʟʏ ɪᴍᴀɢɪɴᴇᴅ.” - Wɪʟʟɪᴀᴍ Bʟᴀᴋᴇ


#88
Craven

Craven

    Elephant in the forest

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,325 posts
  • LocationPoland, Cracow

I'm growing to dislike this comparisons. Just because you emulate certain computation power, does not give you brain activity equivalent.

 

I believe that such headlines in news will lead to some serious misunderstanding when in few years computers reach higher computational power than human brain and media will be full of questions "how come this computer is not smarter than human". Bleh... We need a whole bunch of Carl Sagan's, Neil Tyson's and other sciene communicators in coming years.


"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#89
Brohanne Jahms

Brohanne Jahms

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 598 posts
I'm growing to dislike this comparisons. Just because you emulate certain computation power, does not give you brain activity equivalent.

 

I believe that such headlines in news will lead to some serious misunderstanding when in few years computers reach higher computational power than human brain and media will be full of questions "how come this computer is not smarter than human". Bleh... We need a whole bunch of Carl Sagan's, Neil Tyson's and other sciene communicators in coming years.

 

I thought the benefit was being able to model a brain that works in real time so that we might learn more about how it works and what causes it to fail or change? I don't see the down side to people getting confused about the purpose behind it. (That is the purpose behind it, right?)



#90
Craven

Craven

    Elephant in the forest

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,325 posts
  • LocationPoland, Cracow

It's not the purpose I'm talking about. I'm saying that this talk about percentage, comparing computer computational power with brain's computational power is VERY decieving and may lead to serous misunderstandings.


"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#91
Raklian

Raklian

    An Immortal In The Making

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,514 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC
It's not the purpose I'm talking about. I'm saying that this talk about percentage, comparing computer computational power with brain's computational power is VERY decieving and may lead to serous misunderstandings.

 

Yes, there is potential for that but no progress comes without risks.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#92
Brohanne Jahms

Brohanne Jahms

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 598 posts
It's not the purpose I'm talking about. I'm saying that this talk about percentage, comparing computer computational power with brain's computational power is VERY decieving and may lead to serous misunderstandings.

 

Can I get an example of a misunderstanding that it might cause?



#93
Craven

Craven

    Elephant in the forest

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,325 posts
  • LocationPoland, Cracow

A. Journalist writes about AI that "has IQ of a 4 year old", people expect it to be like 4 year old human.

B. Journalist writes about "AI with computational power of a human brain", people expect it to be a True AI.

 

Look I'm not attacking you. I'm just trying to make a point...


"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#94
Brohanne Jahms

Brohanne Jahms

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 598 posts
Look I'm not attacking you. I'm just trying to make a point...

 

I didn't think you were. There's no reason a discussion can't go on for multiple post without it turning into an argument. Even then, disagreements are just alternate point of views, they don't have to be attacks.

 

I agree with you for the most part, but it's not necessarily a bad thing either. I've learned a long time ago to never assume you know a story based on a sensationalist headline or even by reading one article. For every study you find there are likely to be a dozen experts in the same field disagreeing with it. It forces you to put more effort in than reading one article to form your own opinion and you end up with a larger foundation of knowledge in the end.

 

But yeah, that sensational shit they do is pretty annoying, especially when it catches on and almost becomes a standard like in your examples. It's a pretty effective method of peaking a person's interest though, so it will probably be a trend that will go on for a while.


Edited by Brohanne Jahms, 08 August 2013 - 04:53 AM.

  • Craven likes this

#95
kjaggard

kjaggard

    Artificer

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,827 posts
  • Locationwhere fanciful imaginings and hard won knowledge meet to genesis the future.

http://www.dvice.com...mbie-apocalypse

 

solar powered laptops. what once happened for the calculator is now happening for the computer.


  • Casey likes this
Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#96
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,760 posts

IBM unveils computing architecture based on the brain

Company says its breakthrough could allow for a next generation of applications that mirror the brain's efficiency in perception, cognition, and action.
IBM scientists unveiled an all-new computing architecture on Wednesday that's based on the human brain.

In an announcement tonight, IBM Research said that its new software ecosystem was built to program silicon chips whose architecture is directly inspired by the brain's size, function, and minimal use of power. The company hopes that its breakthrough may support a next generation of applications that could mirror what the brain can achieve in perception, cognition, and action

http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57597519-76/ibm-unveils-computing-architecture-based-on-the-brain/]IBM unveils computing architecture based on the brain | Cutting Edge - CNET News[/url]


  • Raklian likes this

To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#97
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,760 posts

Mystery particle could shrink your hard drive to the size of a peanut

A strange, newly discovered particle could shrink a laptop computer's hard drive to the size of a peanut and an iPod's drive to the size of a rice grain.

The particle, called a skyrmion, is more stable and less power-hungry than its conventional, magnetic cousin. Besides storing data in ultra compact media, skyrmions could lead to faster computers that combine storage with processing power and usher in smaller and smaller devices that have the same computing power as a desktop machine.

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/mystery-particle-could-shrink-your-hard-drive-size-peanut-6C10879170]Mystery particle could shrink your hard drive to the size of a peanut - NBC News.com[/url]


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#98
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,760 posts

Nanowires become signature- and fingerprint-reading LEDs

 

 

What do electronic signatures, fingerprint scans and touch-sensitive robot skin have in common? All three technologies may soon be advancing, thanks to a new system that turns an array of zinc oxide nanowires into tiny LEDs. Each wire illuminates in response to externally-applied mechanical pressure. By analyzing the resulting mosaic of miniscule points of light, a computer is able to produce a high-resolution map of the pressure-applying surface.

The “piezo-phototronic LED” technology has been in development since 2009, and was created by a team from the Georgia Institute of Technology led by Prof. Zhong Lin Wang.

http://www.gizmag.co...nic-leds/28669/


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#99
FutureGuy

FutureGuy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 557 posts

I wasn't really sure where to post this, but whatever...

 

 

 

 

Wireless devices go battery-free with new communication technique

 

 

 

 

We might be one step closer to an Internet-of-things reality. University of Washington engineers have created a new wireless communication system that allows devices to interact with each other without relying on batteries or wires for power.

 

The new communication technique, which the researchers call "ambient backscatter," takes advantage of the TV and cellular transmissions that already surround us around the clock. Two devices communicate with each other by reflecting the existing signals to exchange information. The researchers built small, battery-free devices with antennas that can detect, harness and reflect a TV signal, which then is picked up by other similar devices.
The technology could enable a network of devices and sensors to communicate with no power source or human attention needed.
 
 

 

 

 

 

http://phys.org/news...-technique.html



#100
Colonel O'Neil

Colonel O'Neil

    From Time Immemorial...

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 816 posts
  • LocationLondon, UK

http://www.theguardi...ic-surveillance

 

Is no one else worried about this? As their technology becomes more advances, this will only get worse. Imagine, by 2030 they will be able to monitor everything we do online. And as by 2030, we'll pretty much do everything online-that's not something I'm comfortable with.

 

Whats the point of having all this cool technology, if we lose our freedom?


  • wjfox and Zeitgeist123 like this

The art of forgetting is inherent in human minds; the art of being forgotten  is the normal fate of knowing. We as futurists don't accept that. In the panels of the Universe, we alone will remain standing; remain unforgotten.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: computers, internet, Moores Law, quantum computers, silicon, internet demographics, wireless, 5G, supercomputers, Google

1 user(s) are reading this topic

1 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


    bgates276